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General Fatique, Malaise - how to increase energy levels?



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 26th 05, 07:37 AM
Brian Link
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Default General Fatique, Malaise - how to increase energy levels?

I've slipped a bit in my training regimen lately, due to a number of
issues.. back injury, wrist injury, pneumonia, insane work schedule,
etc..

Lately I've noticed a major reduction in energy. I can't make an
entire day without needing a nap, and can't work into the night as I'm
used to. I wake up foggy, and it takes a few cups of coffee and some
time to shake it in order to get to work.

What general suggestions would y'all have to increasing energy levels?
My diet is somewhat undisciplined, my major focus being to make sure I
get at least 150g of protein in. More fruits & vegetables? Better
vitamins? Better sleep? Natural result of aging? Less focus on our
country selecting a madman as president?

Big catch-all question I know. Looking for personal experiences of
upping energy levels. Thanks

BLink
  #2  
Old January 26th 05, 07:44 AM
rev
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Default

Brian Link wrote in
:

I've slipped a bit in my training regimen lately, due to a number of
issues.. back injury, wrist injury, pneumonia, insane work schedule,
etc..

Lately I've noticed a major reduction in energy. I can't make an
entire day without needing a nap, and can't work into the night as I'm
used to. I wake up foggy, and it takes a few cups of coffee and some
time to shake it in order to get to work.

What general suggestions would y'all have to increasing energy levels?
My diet is somewhat undisciplined, my major focus being to make sure I
get at least 150g of protein in. More fruits & vegetables? Better
vitamins? Better sleep? Natural result of aging? Less focus on our
country selecting a madman as president?

Big catch-all question I know. Looking for personal experiences of
upping energy levels. Thanks

BLink


May I suggest, that along with your other post regarding Glucose levels (
tell your Doc your family history and your symptoms, I am sure he/she will
know what tests to order) etc, that you actually go ask a Doctor? I would
imagine that "back injury, wrist injury, pneumonia, insane work schedule"
plus Glucose issues would sap most peoples energy levels.

Bob

  #3  
Old January 26th 05, 06:49 PM
Larry Hodges
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Default

Brian Link wrote:
I've slipped a bit in my training regimen lately, due to a number of
issues.. back injury, wrist injury, pneumonia, insane work schedule,
etc..

Lately I've noticed a major reduction in energy. I can't make an
entire day without needing a nap, and can't work into the night as I'm
used to. I wake up foggy, and it takes a few cups of coffee and some
time to shake it in order to get to work.

What general suggestions would y'all have to increasing energy levels?
My diet is somewhat undisciplined, my major focus being to make sure I
get at least 150g of protein in. More fruits & vegetables? Better
vitamins? Better sleep? Natural result of aging? Less focus on our
country selecting a madman as president?

Big catch-all question I know. Looking for personal experiences of
upping energy levels. Thanks

BLink


Even though you're a liberal puke, I'll chip in. After all, us
conservatives are the tolerant ones.

Vitamins are important for me. But the biggest single thing I did for my
energy level through the day was to split my meals up. I eat about every
two hours now. When I was doing the typical bfast / lunch / dinner thing, I
would be really dragging by 11am. Then I would eat lunch, and get very
lethargic and remain that way until about an hour after lunch. Sometimes,
the urge to sleep was insatiable, especially if I was driving. I'd
sometimes have to pull over, lay the seat back and sleep for 20 minutes.

Also, enough sleep at night. If I'm working out, I need eight hrs.
--
-Larry


  #4  
Old January 27th 05, 07:26 AM
bellfit
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Default

Go back to the gym, stop working into the night, have enough sleep, go
outdoor for some fresh air (at least an hour a day). Get organized
(www.gymgoal.com)

  #5  
Old January 27th 05, 07:35 AM
Larry Hodges
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DZ wrote:
Larry Hodges wrote:
But the biggest single thing I did for my energy level through the
day was to split my meals up. I eat about every two hours now.
When I was doing the typical bfast / lunch / dinner thing, I would
be really dragging by 11am.


It highly depends on a person. I switched to eating once a day at
11:30pm (right after training) some years ago and haven't noticed any
dragging or lack of progress in my lifts. I'd say the opposite, after
I got used to it.

Another indicator for me is the effectiveness and quality of my
work. I have a friend who studies bibliometry as an aside thing and he
compiles the citation rates of his friends' papers each year; my rate
including that per paper still steadily goes up. In 2004 I got over
100 peer reviewed citations comprised by recent ones so I conclude I'm
not getting lethargic just yet.

DZ


Interesting.
--
-Larry


  #6  
Old January 27th 05, 09:21 AM
rev
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Posts: n/a
Default

"Larry Hodges" wrote in
:

DZ wrote:
Larry Hodges wrote:
But the biggest single thing I did for my energy level through the
day was to split my meals up. I eat about every two hours now.
When I was doing the typical bfast / lunch / dinner thing, I would
be really dragging by 11am.


It highly depends on a person. I switched to eating once a day at
11:30pm (right after training) some years ago and haven't noticed any
dragging or lack of progress in my lifts. I'd say the opposite, after
I got used to it.

Another indicator for me is the effectiveness and quality of my
work. I have a friend who studies bibliometry as an aside thing and he
compiles the citation rates of his friends' papers each year; my rate
including that per paper still steadily goes up. In 2004 I got over
100 peer reviewed citations comprised by recent ones so I conclude I'm
not getting lethargic just yet.

DZ


Interesting.


Yes, indeed. I wonder how I can mess with my diet to increase my citation
rate, even though I publish in a different field. I need to log
scholar.google.com (and Science Citation Index) and relate it to my diet
and exercise over time. I guess when I am dead the citations will stop.

Cheers

Bob
 




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