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BEST WAY TO RUN TWO MILES?



 
 
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  #11  
Old October 6th 04, 10:13 PM
John Dunlop
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Shannon wrote:

When you are running you may also be way out of your target heart
rate zone, which is very dangerous.


Denise Howard replied:

No it isn't.


Jenna then asked:

So what your saying is that running extremely fast even when you are
out of shape and your heart is racing is ok?


I don't believe she implied that; she definitely didn't say
that. We can be sure however that Ms. Howard wasn't
encouraging anybody to push so hard as to injure themselves.

The phrases 'way out', 'target heart rate zone', and 'very
dangerous' each import umpteen different meanings: person
A's interpretation of them isn't necessarily the same as, or
even similar to, person B's. 'Way out' as in far below or
far above? How far? 'Very dangerous' as in life-
threatening? 'Target heart rate zone' as in, well, what
exactly?

All the best!

--
Jock
  #12  
Old October 8th 04, 09:41 AM
Denise Howard
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , John
Dunlop wrote:

Shannon wrote:

When you are running you may also be way out of your target heart
rate zone, which is very dangerous.


Denise Howard replied:

No it isn't.


Jenna then asked:

So what your saying is that running extremely fast even when you are
out of shape and your heart is racing is ok?


I don't believe she implied that; she definitely didn't say
that. We can be sure however that Ms. Howard wasn't
encouraging anybody to push so hard as to injure themselves.

The phrases 'way out', 'target heart rate zone', and 'very
dangerous' each import umpteen different meanings: person
A's interpretation of them isn't necessarily the same as, or
even similar to, person B's. 'Way out' as in far below or
far above? How far? 'Very dangerous' as in life-
threatening? 'Target heart rate zone' as in, well, what
exactly?


What John said.

Also, there are legitimate training methods which have folks exercising
out of their target heart rate zone. How far "out" is up the the
individual, but it can be "way" far out. Interval training, for
example. Nobody has ever suggested that interval training is "very
dangerous."

--
Denise denise dot howard at comcast dot net
ACE and AFAA certified fitness instructor
AFAA step and kickboxing certified
  #13  
Old October 11th 04, 08:11 AM
Joe User
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Posts: n/a
Default

Denise Howard wrote:
John Dunlop wrote:
Shannon wrote:
When you are running you may also be way out of your target heart
rate zone, which is very dangerous.


Denise Howard replied:
No it isn't.

[....]
I don't believe she implied that; she definitely didn't say
that. We can be sure however that Ms. Howard wasn't
encouraging anybody to push so hard as to injure themselves.

[....]
What John said.

Also, there are legitimate training methods which have folks
exercising out of their target heart rate zone.


Absolutely correct! But I think Shannon's comments were
quite appropriate in the context of this thread: 43-year-old
male, smoked 2-1/2 packs a day for a long time, can only
run 1/10th mile, gasping for breath after just 2 min (3 MPH).

As a professional ACE and AFAA certified fitness instructor,
I think you have a responsibility to give "advice" that is
appropriate for the context. At the very least, you should
have qualified your first response ("no it isn't") with the
conditions under which it is and is not appropriate to put
the heart under stress.

In fact, it is entirely possible that for this individual,
even the "target heart rate zone" is too high. I agree with
earlier "advice" that he should simply walk at a comfortable
pace until he can walk for 20-30 min, then intersperse easy
jogging for short durations, increasing the frequency and
duration over time -- all the time limiting himself to
whatever is comfortable. Ideally, use an HRM to give an
objective indication of the heart's workload. Increase the
HR over time, for example by increasing the pace or by
changing the terrain.

"Comfortable" does not mean "at a loping pace". It means
that he should not gasp for breath "so hard [that] he
sounds like a fan blowing". By the time he is able to
walk and/or run for 20-30 min, he should feel like he is
getting a workout. That is a hard thing to quantify.

Only after he can walk and/or run "comfortably" for 20-30
min with a sustained HR middle-to-high in the THR should
he try interval training.

Caveat: There is a great deal of controversy over what is
the "target HR zone". The controversy is not so much about
what percentages constitute the THR, but how to determine
the max HR, which is the basis for computing the THR. I
suggest using an HRM in conjunction with "perceived exertion".
By calibrating HR to (R)PE over time, eventually the HRM
should serve as an objective indicator.
  #14  
Old October 11th 04, 09:10 AM
Denise Howard
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Joe User
wrote:

Denise Howard wrote:
John Dunlop wrote:
Shannon wrote:
When you are running you may also be way out of your target heart
rate zone, which is very dangerous.

Denise Howard replied:
No it isn't.

[....]
I don't believe she implied that; she definitely didn't say
that. We can be sure however that Ms. Howard wasn't
encouraging anybody to push so hard as to injure themselves.

[....]
What John said.

Also, there are legitimate training methods which have folks
exercising out of their target heart rate zone.


Absolutely correct! But I think Shannon's comments were
quite appropriate in the context of this thread: 43-year-old
male, smoked 2-1/2 packs a day for a long time, can only
run 1/10th mile, gasping for breath after just 2 min (3 MPH).

As a professional ACE and AFAA certified fitness instructor,
I think you have a responsibility to give "advice" that is
appropriate for the context. At the very least, you should
have qualified your first response ("no it isn't") with the
conditions under which it is and is not appropriate to put
the heart under stress.


Right you are. And Shannon should've done the same for her offering of
"extremely dangerous". I was short on time, but I couldn't just let
that extreme assertion slide.

In fact, it is entirely possible that for this individual,
even the "target heart rate zone" is too high. I agree with
earlier "advice" that he should simply walk at a comfortable
pace until he can walk for 20-30 min, then intersperse easy
jogging for short durations, increasing the frequency and
duration over time


And allow me to point out that this qualifies as interval training.
It's a mild version, but it's interval training just the same, and it's
a very good way to train toward a continuous effort.

-- all the time limiting himself to
whatever is comfortable. Ideally, use an HRM to give an
objective indication of the heart's workload. Increase the
HR over time, for example by increasing the pace or by
changing the terrain.

"Comfortable" does not mean "at a loping pace". It means
that he should not gasp for breath "so hard [that] he
sounds like a fan blowing". By the time he is able to
walk and/or run for 20-30 min, he should feel like he is
getting a workout. That is a hard thing to quantify.

Only after he can walk and/or run "comfortably" for 20-30
min with a sustained HR middle-to-high in the THR should
he try interval training.

Caveat: There is a great deal of controversy over what is
the "target HR zone". The controversy is not so much about
what percentages constitute the THR, but how to determine
the max HR, which is the basis for computing the THR. I
suggest using an HRM in conjunction with "perceived exertion".
By calibrating HR to (R)PE over time, eventually the HRM
should serve as an objective indicator.


All good info. Thanks for speaking up.

--
Denise denise dot howard at comcast dot net
ACE and AFAA certified fitness instructor
AFAA step and kickboxing certified
 




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