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BEST WAY TO RUN TWO MILES?



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 8th 04, 11:35 AM
barb28
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Default BEST WAY TO RUN TWO MILES?

For a 43 year old male, who has smoked 2 1/2 packs
a day since age 20, and who quit about three years
ago (he has been cleared by his doctor to run), what
is the best way to learn to run two miles? He can
now run about 1/10th (yes, one tenth) of a mile
in about 2 minutes, and then he breaths so hard he
sounds like a fan blowing.

I have been told that he should just get a treadmill
and start out at some specific speed, and then just
go up .1 of a mile an hour every month, and then I've
also read a person should walk the first half mile, and
then run really fast the next quarter mile then walk
a quarter mile etc.

I was just wondering what the current wisdom is.
I think his goal is to eventually be able to do
two 10 minute miles.

Any thoughts appreciated.
  #2  
Old September 8th 04, 02:21 PM
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Le 08-09-2004, barb28 a écrit*:
For a 43 year old male, who has smoked 2 1/2 packs
a day since age 20, and who quit about three years
ago (he has been cleared by his doctor to run), what
is the best way to learn to run two miles? He can
now run about 1/10th (yes, one tenth) of a mile
in about 2 minutes, and then he breaths so hard he
sounds like a fan blowing.

I have been told that he should just get a treadmill
and start out at some specific speed, and then just
go up .1 of a mile an hour every month,


Looks dubious to me (although it would surely work in the end).

and then I've
also read a person should walk the first half mile, and
then run really fast the next quarter mile then walk
a quarter mile etc.


Looks better, except that it is a bad idea to try to "run really fast"
when starting from a low fitness level.

I'd suggest :
- run as long as you can do it relatively easily, say 2 minutes
- walk until you feel you have recovered enough to run again for the same
time as before
- if you cannot run for as long as the first time, walk longer.
- repeat for 20-30 minutes

The main ideas being :
- think "time", not "distance". You want to exercise for at least 20
minutes ; 30 or a little more would be better
- don't push too hard, but
- don't stop : you recover while walking
- do this regularly, each other day for instance

As your fitness improve, the running intervals will become longer, the
walking ones shorter and after a few weeks you should be able to run
continuously. That will do for the 2 miles part.

Regarding speed, if your goal of 10 min./mile is not reached straight
away, the principle is the same : run harder (but not "really fast") for a
few minutes, recover while running more slowly (no walking here), etc...

I was just wondering what the current wisdom is.
I think his goal is to eventually be able to do
two 10 minute miles.

Any thoughts appreciated.

  #3  
Old September 8th 04, 02:23 PM
Beverly
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Default


"barb28" wrote in message
om...
For a 43 year old male, who has smoked 2 1/2 packs
a day since age 20, and who quit about three years
ago (he has been cleared by his doctor to run), what
is the best way to learn to run two miles? He can
now run about 1/10th (yes, one tenth) of a mile
in about 2 minutes, and then he breaths so hard he
sounds like a fan blowing.

I have been told that he should just get a treadmill
and start out at some specific speed, and then just
go up .1 of a mile an hour every month, and then I've
also read a person should walk the first half mile, and
then run really fast the next quarter mile then walk
a quarter mile etc.

I was just wondering what the current wisdom is.
I think his goal is to eventually be able to do
two 10 minute miles.

Any thoughts appreciated.


www.runnersworld.com has some good information on training for beginners.


  #4  
Old September 8th 04, 03:45 PM
Mack McKinnon
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When I started running, some 25 years ago, I could not run around the block
but 10 months later, I completed a 3:43 marathon. I started running at a
very, very slow pace -- so slow that you could almost walk faster -- but I
kept at it for an hour, and did that every other day, then every day except
for 1 day off per week. (Those who follow this method but can't keep it up
even at that slow pace can run/walk/run/walk/run until they can.) I
gradually increased my pace over time, then increased the length of some of
my runs until I could do a couple of 20-milers, a few weeks before the
marathon.

There are those who vehemently disagree with the extremely slow pace method
of starting and they have their arguments but it worked for me and I have
seen it work for many others. There is nothing that will kill a person's
running dreams faster than trying to run too fast for his or level of
conditioning. There's plenty of time for anerobic conditioning work later
in the process.

mack
austin


"barb28" wrote in message
om...
For a 43 year old male, who has smoked 2 1/2 packs
a day since age 20, and who quit about three years
ago (he has been cleared by his doctor to run), what
is the best way to learn to run two miles? He can
now run about 1/10th (yes, one tenth) of a mile
in about 2 minutes, and then he breaths so hard he
sounds like a fan blowing.

I have been told that he should just get a treadmill
and start out at some specific speed, and then just
go up .1 of a mile an hour every month, and then I've
also read a person should walk the first half mile, and
then run really fast the next quarter mile then walk
a quarter mile etc.

I was just wondering what the current wisdom is.
I think his goal is to eventually be able to do
two 10 minute miles.

Any thoughts appreciated.



  #5  
Old September 8th 04, 04:36 PM
Nick Breems
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Posts: n/a
Default


"barb28" wrote in message
om...
For a 43 year old male, who has smoked 2 1/2 packs
a day since age 20, and who quit about three years
ago (he has been cleared by his doctor to run), what
is the best way to learn to run two miles? He can
now run about 1/10th (yes, one tenth) of a mile
in about 2 minutes, and then he breaths so hard he
sounds like a fan blowing.


In addition to the other advice given, I'd add that for a beginner, a heart
rate monitor can make a big difference. (At least, it did for me.) It can
help you to get a feel for how hard your heart is working relative to the
level of exhaustion you're feeling. When every step feels like it's going
to be your last, it can be helpful/reassuring to have a more "objective"
reading of how hard you're really going and whether you should slow down or
keep the same pace.

For a very specific goal such as you've outlined, one method to reach it
might be to pick a maximum heart rate (say 140, for example), and walk/run
at the fastest consistent pace you can without exceeding your max heart
rate, and do this for the full two miles. Sure, the first time it may take
45 minutes, but do it 3-5 times a week, and eventually, you will reach your
goal.

Nick


  #6  
Old September 10th 04, 01:44 AM
Baron
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Default

The heart rate monitor is definitely the way to go. Your friend does
not need a very expensive one. I got a fairly basic Cardiosport for about
$20 on sale and it gives me everything I need.

The advantage of the monitor is that it will keep your friend from
overtraining. This is what tends to happen to beginners. You can easily
run right up to what your cardiovascular system is capable of in its out of
shape condition. This is very discouraging when it happens within the first
few minutes of running.

Someone mentioned that the goal is time rather than distance which I
agree with as well. Eventually, distance or pace can be used as a goal but
initially, time should be the standard.

There are a number of books you can find in any decent bookstore that
address running from a heart rate point of view. Given your friend's lack
of condition, I would strongly suggest he build up his system with a walking
program before changing over to running. There is nothing to be gained by a
beginner running a short distance and then being completely winded. Again,
books on walking using heart rate as a guide are readily obtainable.

Good Luck

"barb28" wrote in message
om...
For a 43 year old male, who has smoked 2 1/2 packs
a day since age 20, and who quit about three years
ago (he has been cleared by his doctor to run), what
is the best way to learn to run two miles? He can
now run about 1/10th (yes, one tenth) of a mile
in about 2 minutes, and then he breaths so hard he
sounds like a fan blowing.

I have been told that he should just get a treadmill
and start out at some specific speed, and then just
go up .1 of a mile an hour every month, and then I've
also read a person should walk the first half mile, and
then run really fast the next quarter mile then walk
a quarter mile etc.

I was just wondering what the current wisdom is.
I think his goal is to eventually be able to do
two 10 minute miles.

Any thoughts appreciated.



  #7  
Old September 10th 04, 12:25 PM
Geezer From The Freezer
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Posts: n/a
Default



barb28 wrote:

For a 43 year old male, who has smoked 2 1/2 packs
a day since age 20, and who quit about three years
ago (he has been cleared by his doctor to run), what
is the best way to learn to run two miles? He can
now run about 1/10th (yes, one tenth) of a mile
in about 2 minutes, and then he breaths so hard he
sounds like a fan blowing.

I have been told that he should just get a treadmill
and start out at some specific speed, and then just
go up .1 of a mile an hour every month, and then I've
also read a person should walk the first half mile, and
then run really fast the next quarter mile then walk
a quarter mile etc.

I was just wondering what the current wisdom is.
I think his goal is to eventually be able to do
two 10 minute miles.

Any thoughts appreciated.


If you/he can only run 0.1 miles then can I suggest you do several 30 minute - 1
hour walks
a week, pick up the pace while your walking to get your heart going and your
breathing
deeper. You should be able to walk about 3 miles in 45 minutes fairly easily.
Once
you feel comfortable try a slow jog and progress from there.
  #9  
Old October 5th 04, 04:03 PM
Denise Howard
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Default

In article , Shannon
wrote:

When you
are running you may also be way out of your target heart rate zone,
which is very dangerous.


No it isn't.

--
Denise denise dot howard at comcast dot net
ACE and AFAA certified fitness instructor
AFAA step and kickboxing certified
  #10  
Old October 6th 04, 06:08 PM
Jenna
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Default

So what your saying is that running extremely fast even when you are
out of shape and your heart is racing is ok? How is it okay for your
heart to be working overtime?
 




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