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Newbie wants to get fit



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 11th 04, 09:52 PM
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Default Newbie wants to get fit

Hello,

I am a 32 year old male who in the past has not really exercised that
much. But now I'm in my 30's I'm more conscious of my fitness and want
to try and get a routine going to help me feel fit.

Problem is, I don't know what sort of routine to get into. I do a
mixture of press-ups, situps and wave my arms about a bit, but I would
like some kind of structure to my routine so I know I'm not doing it
by half measure, or doing too much.

If anyone can give me some advice, I'd appreciate the guidance!

Thanks,

Sean
  #3  
Old October 12th 04, 04:25 PM
Eric Riehl
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On 2004-10-12, bunnyKilla wrote:
wrote:

Its a good idea to do some weights because as we age our muscle mass
declines naturally. And ofcourse cardio is good for the heart/lungs etc.

Phil


How safe are weights? That's always been my biggest concern.
I often read about people who lifted seriously all their lives
having problems with joints later in life. There are always the
stories of serious injuries, too, when somebody lost control of
a heavy weight.

The last time I tried lifting weights, I quickly moved to the
place where I could smith lunge 450 pounds, but the workout seemed
no more difficult to me than an exercise without weights where I would
low walk up a steep incline.

It seems to me that the only thing weights have going for them is
that it's easy to progressively increase the resistance, say, by
just adding another plate or using a dumbell thats a few pounds
heavier. You just do the exercise you previously knew how to do.

With functional strength exercies, one has learn more
difficult exercises once their strengh gets to the point where the
last exercise is easy.

What would you think of just using those resistance bands which
are so popular these days? It's easier to increase the resistance
by using heavier bands and decreasing the amount of band that's
stretched, and if the band slips, it might produce a little sting
or some damage if it snaps you, but much less than losing control of
450 pounds on a smith lunge machine.

Eric Riehl

--
Let us remember that the ideas which need the most
clarifying are often those to which we say
"of course."
-- Mabel E. Todd
  #4  
Old October 12th 04, 05:02 PM
bunnyKilla
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Eric Riehl wrote:

On 2004-10-12, bunnyKilla wrote:

wrote:

Its a good idea to do some weights because as we age our muscle mass
declines naturally. And ofcourse cardio is good for the heart/lungs etc.

Phil



How safe are weights? That's always been my biggest concern.
I often read about people who lifted seriously all their lives
having problems with joints later in life. There are always the
stories of serious injuries, too, when somebody lost control of
a heavy weight.

The last time I tried lifting weights, I quickly moved to the
place where I could smith lunge 450 pounds, but the workout seemed
no more difficult to me than an exercise without weights where I would
low walk up a steep incline.

It seems to me that the only thing weights have going for them is
that it's easy to progressively increase the resistance, say, by
just adding another plate or using a dumbell thats a few pounds
heavier. You just do the exercise you previously knew how to do.

With functional strength exercies, one has learn more
difficult exercises once their strengh gets to the point where the
last exercise is easy.

What would you think of just using those resistance bands which
are so popular these days? It's easier to increase the resistance
by using heavier bands and decreasing the amount of band that's
stretched, and if the band slips, it might produce a little sting
or some damage if it snaps you, but much less than losing control of
450 pounds on a smith lunge machine.

Eric Riehl

Hi Eric

Weights are very safe if the exercises are done right. Unfortunately
most people don't perfrom the exercises correctly or simply perform
dangerous exercises. It's like any sport learn how to do it properly or
you will end up injured.

Using a smith machine isn't a very good idea imo, the bar is on a fixed
plane, this forces the body into an unnatural range of motion. Free
weights allow individuals to move in their own range of motion which is
much safer and natural.

Phil
  #5  
Old October 13th 04, 02:09 AM
frank-in-toronto
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On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 15:02:47 GMT, bunnyKilla
wrote:

Eric Riehl wrote:

On 2004-10-12, bunnyKilla wrote:

wrote:

Its a good idea to do some weights because as we age our muscle mass
declines naturally. And ofcourse cardio is good for the heart/lungs etc.

Phil



How safe are weights? That's always been my biggest concern.
I often read about people who lifted seriously all their lives
having problems with joints later in life. There are always the
stories of serious injuries, too, when somebody lost control of
a heavy weight.

The last time I tried lifting weights, I quickly moved to the
place where I could smith lunge 450 pounds, but the workout seemed
no more difficult to me than an exercise without weights where I would
low walk up a steep incline.

It seems to me that the only thing weights have going for them is
that it's easy to progressively increase the resistance, say, by
just adding another plate or using a dumbell thats a few pounds
heavier. You just do the exercise you previously knew how to do.

With functional strength exercies, one has learn more
difficult exercises once their strengh gets to the point where the
last exercise is easy.

What would you think of just using those resistance bands which
are so popular these days? It's easier to increase the resistance
by using heavier bands and decreasing the amount of band that's
stretched, and if the band slips, it might produce a little sting
or some damage if it snaps you, but much less than losing control of
450 pounds on a smith lunge machine.

Eric Riehl

Hi Eric

Weights are very safe if the exercises are done right. Unfortunately
most people don't perfrom the exercises correctly or simply perform
dangerous exercises. It's like any sport learn how to do it properly or
you will end up injured.

Using a smith machine isn't a very good idea imo, the bar is on a fixed
plane, this forces the body into an unnatural range of motion. Free
weights allow individuals to move in their own range of motion which is
much safer and natural.

that's true of course. also i really doubt if you're using 450 pounds
for a lunge. if you're going at all deep, that's almost like
a 900 pound smith squat. i really doubt it.

stop doing short rom and do as full as your flexibility allows.
lower the weight for goodness sake. get some free weights
and don't lift them above your body without a spotter
or safety device. use dumbbells. your joints will be fine
if you progressively increase the weight. give yourself
lots of time. stay away from silly bands. please.
....thehick
  #6  
Old October 13th 04, 09:46 AM
bunnyKilla
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Default



that's true of course. also i really doubt if you're using 450 pounds
for a lunge. if you're going at all deep, that's almost like
a 900 pound smith squat. i really doubt it.

stop doing short rom and do as full as your flexibility allows.
lower the weight for goodness sake. get some free weights
and don't lift them above your body without a spotter
or safety device. use dumbbells. your joints will be fine
if you progressively increase the weight. give yourself
lots of time. stay away from silly bands. please.
...thehick


One thing i'd point out, althouhg it doesn't apply to everyone with
joint problems who lifts weight, is that people who use steroids can
suffer joint problems. Muscles very quickly gain strength on these
drugs, the tendons and ligaments can keep up, this can result in joint
pain and or tendons / ligaments being torn away from the bone.

bunnykilla
  #7  
Old October 13th 04, 10:44 AM
Peter Webb
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Default


wrote in message
...
Hello,

I am a 32 year old male who in the past has not really exercised that
much. But now I'm in my 30's I'm more conscious of my fitness and want
to try and get a routine going to help me feel fit.

Problem is, I don't know what sort of routine to get into. I do a
mixture of press-ups, situps and wave my arms about a bit, but I would
like some kind of structure to my routine so I know I'm not doing it
by half measure, or doing too much.

If anyone can give me some advice, I'd appreciate the guidance!

Thanks,

Sean


Wander over to misc.fitness.weights where this question is asked (and
answered) all the time.

BTW, I can't believe that the main responses you have had are about the
safety of weights. Weightlifting is an extremely safe sport, with
overwhelmingly positive effects on the body. I took it up five years ago at
43, and have never had an injury - the only effect has been to make me fit,
help me lose fat, and make my muscles hyuge. Meanwhile my friends who took
up Over 35 soccer have all had multiple knee reconstructions, and are most
certainly not hyuge.

You are right to want some structure - you get far, far better results if
you know what you are doing. There are many web pages for exactly this
purpose, but as I say if you subscribe to misc.fitness.weights you will see
somebody posting an answer to this question in the next few days, or you can
just ask it yourself there.



  #8  
Old October 13th 04, 03:51 PM
John Dunlop
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Default

Peter Webb wrote:

[ ... ]

Weightlifting is an extremely safe sport,


Although in safety terms lifting weights pales in comparison
to that physically demanding and draining activity, that
sport of all sports: left-handed, blindfolded tiddlywinks.

--
Jock
  #9  
Old October 13th 04, 03:58 PM
Eric Riehl
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Default

On 2004-10-13, frank-in-toronto wrote:
that's true of course. also i really doubt if you're using 450 pounds
for a lunge. if you're going at all deep, that's almost like
a 900 pound smith squat. i really doubt it.


I'm sorry. It was a 450 lb smith squat with full range of
motion, that is thigh parallel to the gound at the lowest point
of the squat.

The third time I used a smith lunge machine, a trainer at the
club where I was working out commented to me "you must have
been lifting weights for a long time."

I replied that it was only my third time, and that it's possible
to become strong without using weights.

I stopped lifting weights soon after I started because of my
concern over what might happen if I lost control of one of
the weights.

Eric Riehl
  #10  
Old October 13th 04, 06:31 PM
Eric Riehl
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Default

One of the things you always read in any weight lifting
book is to be sure to have a spotter when you lift
weights. Would the all the books on weight lifting include
this advice, which thay are say is essential, if there wasn't
the potential for injury if control was lost of the pig iron
being used in the exercise? I think not.

Eric Riehl


On 2004-10-13, John Dunlop wrote:
Peter Webb wrote:

[ ... ]

Weightlifting is an extremely safe sport,


Although in safety terms lifting weights pales in comparison
to that physically demanding and draining activity, that
sport of all sports: left-handed, blindfolded tiddlywinks.

 




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