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treadmill + elliptical or rowing machine???



 
 
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  #11  
Old December 8th 03, 03:57 AM
Steve Freides
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default treadmill + elliptical or rowing machine???

"Amy Fong" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 29 Nov 2003 10:13:06 -0500, Steve Freides wrote:

"Amy Fong" wrote in message
news
Hi,

I currently have a treadmill. I'm debating between getting an

elliptical
or a rowing machine for variety and to go easy on my joints. Any
recommendations?


It's easiest to do nothing at all.

If you learn how to take care of your joints and how to exercise with

good
technique, you can use any of these machines safely and with good

results.
If you learn how to strength train as a separate item from aerobic

training,
you will likely benefit in many ways. I see so many people with big

bellies
spending an hour a day on a treadmill, bicycle, or elliptical trainer -

such
training does not seem to help them.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


Many people say that it's not a good idea to do the same exercise
repeatedly - any thoughts?


Hogwash! Strength training is, for all intents and purposes, like learning
to play the piano - if you don't do it regularly and often, you don't get
much better at it.

Overuse injuries do occur, of course, and maybe that's what whoever you're
quoting was thinking of, but proper technique and a proper workout schedule
should be able to deal with most overuse injuries.

Within certain parameters, varying exercise is a good thing. Abdominal
exercise is a good example - everyone needs a strong midsection but no one
really needs to excel in the performance of any particular abdominal
exercise so varying abdominal exercises is a fine thing. But for an
exercise in which the participant wants to excel and in which form is
important to the prevention of injury, repetition breeds skill and skill
prevents injury.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


  #12  
Old December 8th 03, 04:03 AM
Steve Freides
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default treadmill + elliptical or rowing machine???

"Frank" wrote in message
om...
"Steve Freides" wrote in message

...

It's easiest to do nothing at all.

If you learn how to take care of your joints and how to exercise with

good
technique, you can use any of these machines safely and with good

results.
If you learn how to strength train as a separate item from aerobic

training,
you will likely benefit in many ways. I see so many people with big

bellies
spending an hour a day on a treadmill, bicycle, or elliptical trainer -

such
training does not seem to help them.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


Obviously "people with big bellies" could stand to lose some weight,
but to say that an hour's worth of cardiovascular work a day is not
helping them seems a little negative.


I don't mean to be too harsh - any exercise is better than none. But I work
part-time as a personal trainer at my local YMCA (volunteer would be a
better description - I get paid less for a day's work at the Y than I get
paid for an hour at my regular job) and I see lots of people working out for
very long times on the various treadmills, elliptical trainers, stair
climbers, and exercise bikes we have, as well as regularly pushing around
light weights for high repetitions on the machines. None of these people
have a body that's particularly attractive and very few of them manage to
stay anything less than overweight. Perhaps all that aerobic exercise
helped get them from grossly overweight to only somewhat overweight but my
point remains.

I will stand by my claim that all the hour of cardio does for most people is
allow them to eat more. I have found, as Rita observed above, that strength
training combined with cardio is much more successful in truly changing the
body composition of people who exercise, and I believe that focusing on
strength training and having only a relatively small amount of cardio, e.g.,
20 minutes 3x/week or even less, is best for most people. I have no
philosophical ax to grind here, at least none that I'm aware of. I'm a life
long runner, bicyclist, and swimmer and I do much less of those things
nowadays - I do them when I want to and for fun - and focus my training on
strength and strength/endurance work and, in all modesty, I've got a body I
never dreamed was even possible for me, close to single digits in bodyfat
percentage in my late 40's. I could never shed those few extra pounds when
I was putting in all those miles on the road and in the pool.

Just my 2-cents worth.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


  #13  
Old December 10th 03, 06:05 PM
Atlas
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default treadmill + elliptical or rowing machine???

x-no-archive: yes

On Thu, 27 Nov 2003 00:27:27 GMT, Amy Fong wrote:

I currently have a treadmill. I'm debating between getting an elliptical
or a rowing machine for variety and to go easy on my joints. Any
recommendations?


I have a Smooth Fitness Elliptical (ME). It's an excellent
machine. $900.00 delivered to your door.




Atlas
  #14  
Old December 11th 03, 04:25 AM
Frank
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default treadmill + elliptical or rowing machine???

"Steve Freides" wrote in message ...

I don't mean to be too harsh - any exercise is better than none. But I work
part-time as a personal trainer at my local YMCA (volunteer would be a
better description - I get paid less for a day's work at the Y than I get
paid for an hour at my regular job) and I see lots of people working out for
very long times on the various treadmills, elliptical trainers, stair
climbers, and exercise bikes we have, as well as regularly pushing around
light weights for high repetitions on the machines. None of these people
have a body that's particularly attractive and very few of them manage to
stay anything less than overweight. Perhaps all that aerobic exercise
helped get them from grossly overweight to only somewhat overweight but my
point remains.

I will stand by my claim that all the hour of cardio does for most people is
allow them to eat more. I have found, as Rita observed above, that strength
training combined with cardio is much more successful in truly changing the
body composition of people who exercise, and I believe that focusing on
strength training and having only a relatively small amount of cardio, e.g.,
20 minutes 3x/week or even less, is best for most people. I have no
philosophical ax to grind here, at least none that I'm aware of. I'm a life
long runner, bicyclist, and swimmer and I do much less of those things
nowadays - I do them when I want to and for fun - and focus my training on
strength and strength/endurance work and, in all modesty, I've got a body I
never dreamed was even possible for me, close to single digits in bodyfat
percentage in my late 40's. I could never shed those few extra pounds when
I was putting in all those miles on the road and in the pool.

Just my 2-cents worth.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


I don't mean to be too harsh either. But a year ago I had just had
two stents implanted and asked advice of this group because even mild
exercise was painful and exhausting. Rita was most encouraging. I
followed her advice, and now I'm in much better shape than I was and
feeling better than I have in years. Oddly enough I've actually
gained a little weight. My exercise consists of 30 minutes a day,
four days a week on a treadmill, and I've had to work up to that. I
was in horrible physical shape. Now I'm in much better shape. Some
people have to work harder to achieve less than you have, but it does
them no good to criticize their efforts as worthless. If I'd listened
to you instead of Rita a year ago, I wonder how I would have done.
  #15  
Old December 12th 03, 10:53 PM
KenP
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default treadmill + elliptical or rowing machine???

OK. I have been following this thread now since it started. And I read
alot of the messages on this board. And more then once I have seen
Steve comment that he is a personal trainer working at the YMCA. I was
curious what certifications that he has? And before you get defensive
I am not trying to insult you. I can say that I do not agree with you
though. I have been in the fitness industry since 1989 and have never
heard a trainer say that just doing cardio is a waste of time. I am
not sure the AMA would agree either. I would much rather have a client
walk every day for atleast 30 minutes then never work out because its
"a waste of time".
 




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