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  #1  
Old September 15th 03, 04:27 PM
One Step Beyond
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Stuck on what to do

Guys,
I am quite a muscular guy (6 feet 2 and 220 lbs) and a newcomer to
triathlon - I have not done one yet. I aim to shed about 30lbs and get cut
up and improve my fitness though I am reasonably fit now. I can normally
run 5 miles (35 minutes-ish) and I am working hard at this. I have a great
bike and cycle about 40 miles for training and I keep to the high
cadence/lighter effort method.

My problem. I find that I simply cannot, no matter how hard I try, run
further than about a mile after getting off the bike. My legs are complete
jelly and I feel strange and wobbly. I am not being a big sissy here
either - I am used to sporting effort in soccer and weight training. What
do you reckon here? Do you think that I am simply carrying too much weight
and it'll get better as it comes off? Is it one of those things that you
simply have to grin and bare it?

What do you reckon to weight training in Triathlon? Does it have a part to
play or should I cut it down? I do three sessions a week at the moment.
What about squats/leg extensions?

In short, how should a larger more muscular guy proceed in this sport?

Thanks.

Slim


  #2  
Old September 15th 03, 08:10 PM
Heidi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Stuck on what to do

Slim,

Some ideas that might help:

1). If you have not done so already, bring your bike to a reputable
bike dealer and have them fit your bike to you. (You'll know it's a
reputable bike dealer if their idea of fitting someone on a bike is to
measure you crotch to notch--if they tell you to stand over your top
tube and see how much clearance is between your crotch and tube, take
your bike and run like hell out of the store). Go to a store which will
set your bike up on a trainer and see how you look in the saddle (as in,
how your position is in the saddle--not how good you look . They may
suggest you adjust the height of your seat, length of stem, etc...Place
electric tape, or something like it on your seat so that you will always
remember the appropriate height. Assuming you have a road bike, you
might want to try extending your seat forward with a tri post. Make
sure you are keeping your feet flat when you are peddling (instead of
pointing your toes down).

2). Start a regular stretching routine. Take a few moments in the
morning and evening to stretch, as well as before your workouts. Once
your muscles get more limber, transitioning from running to biking will
be easier.

3). Try reducing the mileage of your bike on your bricks. Start with a
shorter bike distance, followed by a run and build up from that. If you
feel wobbly on the run, take a moment to stretch, rest, and/or walk, and
then run again when you feel ready. Baby steps! When you are near the
end of your bike ride--stand up out of the saddle, with your legs almost
straight, and lean forward so that you can feel your quads stretching
out, helping to prep for the run.

4). Experiment w/ your weight lifting routine. Try taking 4 days off
from any leg work and then do a brick--see if it makes a difference.

On a personal note, I have very muscular legs for my frame and find for
me it is better not to do any weight lifting leg work during tri
season. I'll do some leg work during the off season/winter months just
to keep up strength. I do upper body year round, but I taper off
completely from upper body weights the week of a race.

Happy training,
heidi







One Step Beyond wrote:

Guys,
I am quite a muscular guy (6 feet 2 and 220 lbs) and a newcomer to
triathlon - I have not done one yet. I aim to shed about 30lbs and get cut
up and improve my fitness though I am reasonably fit now. I can normally
run 5 miles (35 minutes-ish) and I am working hard at this. I have a great
bike and cycle about 40 miles for training and I keep to the high
cadence/lighter effort method.

My problem. I find that I simply cannot, no matter how hard I try, run
further than about a mile after getting off the bike. My legs are complete
jelly and I feel strange and wobbly. I am not being a big sissy here
either - I am used to sporting effort in soccer and weight training. What
do you reckon here? Do you think that I am simply carrying too much weight
and it'll get better as it comes off? Is it one of those things that you
simply have to grin and bare it?

What do you reckon to weight training in Triathlon? Does it have a part to
play or should I cut it down? I do three sessions a week at the moment.
What about squats/leg extensions?

In short, how should a larger more muscular guy proceed in this sport?

Thanks.

Slim





  #3  
Old September 15th 03, 08:10 PM
Heidi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Stuck on what to do

Slim,

Some ideas that might help:

1). If you have not done so already, bring your bike to a reputable
bike dealer and have them fit your bike to you. (You'll know it's a
reputable bike dealer if their idea of fitting someone on a bike is to
measure you crotch to notch--if they tell you to stand over your top
tube and see how much clearance is between your crotch and tube, take
your bike and run like hell out of the store). Go to a store which will
set your bike up on a trainer and see how you look in the saddle (as in,
how your position is in the saddle--not how good you look . They may
suggest you adjust the height of your seat, length of stem, etc...Place
electric tape, or something like it on your seat so that you will always
remember the appropriate height. Assuming you have a road bike, you
might want to try extending your seat forward with a tri post. Make
sure you are keeping your feet flat when you are peddling (instead of
pointing your toes down).

2). Start a regular stretching routine. Take a few moments in the
morning and evening to stretch, as well as before your workouts. Once
your muscles get more limber, transitioning from running to biking will
be easier.

3). Try reducing the mileage of your bike on your bricks. Start with a
shorter bike distance, followed by a run and build up from that. If you
feel wobbly on the run, take a moment to stretch, rest, and/or walk, and
then run again when you feel ready. Baby steps! When you are near the
end of your bike ride--stand up out of the saddle, with your legs almost
straight, and lean forward so that you can feel your quads stretching
out, helping to prep for the run.

4). Experiment w/ your weight lifting routine. Try taking 4 days off
from any leg work and then do a brick--see if it makes a difference.

On a personal note, I have very muscular legs for my frame and find for
me it is better not to do any weight lifting leg work during tri
season. I'll do some leg work during the off season/winter months just
to keep up strength. I do upper body year round, but I taper off
completely from upper body weights the week of a race.

Happy training,
heidi







One Step Beyond wrote:

Guys,
I am quite a muscular guy (6 feet 2 and 220 lbs) and a newcomer to
triathlon - I have not done one yet. I aim to shed about 30lbs and get cut
up and improve my fitness though I am reasonably fit now. I can normally
run 5 miles (35 minutes-ish) and I am working hard at this. I have a great
bike and cycle about 40 miles for training and I keep to the high
cadence/lighter effort method.

My problem. I find that I simply cannot, no matter how hard I try, run
further than about a mile after getting off the bike. My legs are complete
jelly and I feel strange and wobbly. I am not being a big sissy here
either - I am used to sporting effort in soccer and weight training. What
do you reckon here? Do you think that I am simply carrying too much weight
and it'll get better as it comes off? Is it one of those things that you
simply have to grin and bare it?

What do you reckon to weight training in Triathlon? Does it have a part to
play or should I cut it down? I do three sessions a week at the moment.
What about squats/leg extensions?

In short, how should a larger more muscular guy proceed in this sport?

Thanks.

Slim





  #4  
Old September 15th 03, 08:27 PM
One Step Beyond
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Stuck on what to do

Thanks for answering so comprehensively. So carrying natural muscularity is
not too much of a problem then? Don't get me wrong, I am nothing like Arnie
or anything. More of a American Footballer type.

In terms of eating, I am cutting back to lose that 30lb. The way I see it
(and I could be wrong - probably am) I don't need any extra "energy" before
training since I have plenty of "energy" stored in lard on my 34 inch waist
that used to be 30 inches. Boy, it will be again soon - I swear it!!!

Any good URLS you can point me to?

Thanks Heidi,

Slim



"Heidi" wrote in message
. ..
Slim,

Some ideas that might help:

1). If you have not done so already, bring your bike to a reputable
bike dealer and have them fit your bike to you. (You'll know it's a
reputable bike dealer if their idea of fitting someone on a bike is to
measure you crotch to notch--if they tell you to stand over your top
tube and see how much clearance is between your crotch and tube, take
your bike and run like hell out of the store). Go to a store which will
set your bike up on a trainer and see how you look in the saddle (as in,
how your position is in the saddle--not how good you look . They may
suggest you adjust the height of your seat, length of stem, etc...Place
electric tape, or something like it on your seat so that you will always
remember the appropriate height. Assuming you have a road bike, you
might want to try extending your seat forward with a tri post. Make
sure you are keeping your feet flat when you are peddling (instead of
pointing your toes down).

2). Start a regular stretching routine. Take a few moments in the
morning and evening to stretch, as well as before your workouts. Once
your muscles get more limber, transitioning from running to biking will
be easier.

3). Try reducing the mileage of your bike on your bricks. Start with a
shorter bike distance, followed by a run and build up from that. If you
feel wobbly on the run, take a moment to stretch, rest, and/or walk, and
then run again when you feel ready. Baby steps! When you are near the
end of your bike ride--stand up out of the saddle, with your legs almost
straight, and lean forward so that you can feel your quads stretching
out, helping to prep for the run.

4). Experiment w/ your weight lifting routine. Try taking 4 days off
from any leg work and then do a brick--see if it makes a difference.

On a personal note, I have very muscular legs for my frame and find for
me it is better not to do any weight lifting leg work during tri
season. I'll do some leg work during the off season/winter months just
to keep up strength. I do upper body year round, but I taper off
completely from upper body weights the week of a race.

Happy training,
heidi







One Step Beyond wrote:

Guys,
I am quite a muscular guy (6 feet 2 and 220 lbs) and a newcomer to
triathlon - I have not done one yet. I aim to shed about 30lbs and get

cut
up and improve my fitness though I am reasonably fit now. I can

normally
run 5 miles (35 minutes-ish) and I am working hard at this. I have a

great
bike and cycle about 40 miles for training and I keep to the high
cadence/lighter effort method.

My problem. I find that I simply cannot, no matter how hard I try, run
further than about a mile after getting off the bike. My legs are

complete
jelly and I feel strange and wobbly. I am not being a big sissy here
either - I am used to sporting effort in soccer and weight training.

What
do you reckon here? Do you think that I am simply carrying too much

weight
and it'll get better as it comes off? Is it one of those things that you
simply have to grin and bare it?

What do you reckon to weight training in Triathlon? Does it have a part

to
play or should I cut it down? I do three sessions a week at the moment.
What about squats/leg extensions?

In short, how should a larger more muscular guy proceed in this sport?

Thanks.

Slim







  #5  
Old September 15th 03, 08:27 PM
One Step Beyond
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Stuck on what to do

Thanks for answering so comprehensively. So carrying natural muscularity is
not too much of a problem then? Don't get me wrong, I am nothing like Arnie
or anything. More of a American Footballer type.

In terms of eating, I am cutting back to lose that 30lb. The way I see it
(and I could be wrong - probably am) I don't need any extra "energy" before
training since I have plenty of "energy" stored in lard on my 34 inch waist
that used to be 30 inches. Boy, it will be again soon - I swear it!!!

Any good URLS you can point me to?

Thanks Heidi,

Slim



"Heidi" wrote in message
. ..
Slim,

Some ideas that might help:

1). If you have not done so already, bring your bike to a reputable
bike dealer and have them fit your bike to you. (You'll know it's a
reputable bike dealer if their idea of fitting someone on a bike is to
measure you crotch to notch--if they tell you to stand over your top
tube and see how much clearance is between your crotch and tube, take
your bike and run like hell out of the store). Go to a store which will
set your bike up on a trainer and see how you look in the saddle (as in,
how your position is in the saddle--not how good you look . They may
suggest you adjust the height of your seat, length of stem, etc...Place
electric tape, or something like it on your seat so that you will always
remember the appropriate height. Assuming you have a road bike, you
might want to try extending your seat forward with a tri post. Make
sure you are keeping your feet flat when you are peddling (instead of
pointing your toes down).

2). Start a regular stretching routine. Take a few moments in the
morning and evening to stretch, as well as before your workouts. Once
your muscles get more limber, transitioning from running to biking will
be easier.

3). Try reducing the mileage of your bike on your bricks. Start with a
shorter bike distance, followed by a run and build up from that. If you
feel wobbly on the run, take a moment to stretch, rest, and/or walk, and
then run again when you feel ready. Baby steps! When you are near the
end of your bike ride--stand up out of the saddle, with your legs almost
straight, and lean forward so that you can feel your quads stretching
out, helping to prep for the run.

4). Experiment w/ your weight lifting routine. Try taking 4 days off
from any leg work and then do a brick--see if it makes a difference.

On a personal note, I have very muscular legs for my frame and find for
me it is better not to do any weight lifting leg work during tri
season. I'll do some leg work during the off season/winter months just
to keep up strength. I do upper body year round, but I taper off
completely from upper body weights the week of a race.

Happy training,
heidi







One Step Beyond wrote:

Guys,
I am quite a muscular guy (6 feet 2 and 220 lbs) and a newcomer to
triathlon - I have not done one yet. I aim to shed about 30lbs and get

cut
up and improve my fitness though I am reasonably fit now. I can

normally
run 5 miles (35 minutes-ish) and I am working hard at this. I have a

great
bike and cycle about 40 miles for training and I keep to the high
cadence/lighter effort method.

My problem. I find that I simply cannot, no matter how hard I try, run
further than about a mile after getting off the bike. My legs are

complete
jelly and I feel strange and wobbly. I am not being a big sissy here
either - I am used to sporting effort in soccer and weight training.

What
do you reckon here? Do you think that I am simply carrying too much

weight
and it'll get better as it comes off? Is it one of those things that you
simply have to grin and bare it?

What do you reckon to weight training in Triathlon? Does it have a part

to
play or should I cut it down? I do three sessions a week at the moment.
What about squats/leg extensions?

In short, how should a larger more muscular guy proceed in this sport?

Thanks.

Slim







  #6  
Old September 15th 03, 08:32 PM
Jim Gosse
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Stuck on what to do

My good man. You are experiencing lead legs. Heidi's advice is quite good.
You should also try to get in some Bricks and transition runs.

In case you are not sure of the terminology, a brick is a combination
workout. like a 20k bike ride, followed by a 5km run. Transitions runs are
similar, but instead of a full run after your ride, you only run for about 5
or 10 minutes, just to get your body used to the transition.

Lead Legs get better with time, but never completely goes away.

Hope this helps.

Jim



"One Step Beyond" wrote in message
...
Guys,
I am quite a muscular guy (6 feet 2 and 220 lbs) and a newcomer to
triathlon - I have not done one yet. I aim to shed about 30lbs and get

cut
up and improve my fitness though I am reasonably fit now. I can normally
run 5 miles (35 minutes-ish) and I am working hard at this. I have a

great
bike and cycle about 40 miles for training and I keep to the high
cadence/lighter effort method.

My problem. I find that I simply cannot, no matter how hard I try, run
further than about a mile after getting off the bike. My legs are

complete
jelly and I feel strange and wobbly. I am not being a big sissy here
either - I am used to sporting effort in soccer and weight training. What
do you reckon here? Do you think that I am simply carrying too much

weight
and it'll get better as it comes off? Is it one of those things that you
simply have to grin and bare it?

What do you reckon to weight training in Triathlon? Does it have a part

to
play or should I cut it down? I do three sessions a week at the moment.
What about squats/leg extensions?

In short, how should a larger more muscular guy proceed in this sport?

Thanks.

Slim




  #7  
Old September 15th 03, 08:32 PM
Jim Gosse
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Stuck on what to do

My good man. You are experiencing lead legs. Heidi's advice is quite good.
You should also try to get in some Bricks and transition runs.

In case you are not sure of the terminology, a brick is a combination
workout. like a 20k bike ride, followed by a 5km run. Transitions runs are
similar, but instead of a full run after your ride, you only run for about 5
or 10 minutes, just to get your body used to the transition.

Lead Legs get better with time, but never completely goes away.

Hope this helps.

Jim



"One Step Beyond" wrote in message
...
Guys,
I am quite a muscular guy (6 feet 2 and 220 lbs) and a newcomer to
triathlon - I have not done one yet. I aim to shed about 30lbs and get

cut
up and improve my fitness though I am reasonably fit now. I can normally
run 5 miles (35 minutes-ish) and I am working hard at this. I have a

great
bike and cycle about 40 miles for training and I keep to the high
cadence/lighter effort method.

My problem. I find that I simply cannot, no matter how hard I try, run
further than about a mile after getting off the bike. My legs are

complete
jelly and I feel strange and wobbly. I am not being a big sissy here
either - I am used to sporting effort in soccer and weight training. What
do you reckon here? Do you think that I am simply carrying too much

weight
and it'll get better as it comes off? Is it one of those things that you
simply have to grin and bare it?

What do you reckon to weight training in Triathlon? Does it have a part

to
play or should I cut it down? I do three sessions a week at the moment.
What about squats/leg extensions?

In short, how should a larger more muscular guy proceed in this sport?

Thanks.

Slim




  #8  
Old September 16th 03, 08:02 AM
Cathy Morgan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Stuck on what to do

In article , "One Step
Beyond" wrote:

My problem. I find that I simply cannot, no matter how hard I try, run
further than about a mile after getting off the bike. My legs are complete
jelly and I feel strange and wobbly.


Sounds like you are going too hard on the bike. Go over to
www.coachgordo.com and do some reading on the forum. Slow down on the
bike for a better run.

clm in sf

--

cathy morgan, san francisco, ca
REMOVE x x to email
  #9  
Old September 16th 03, 08:02 AM
Cathy Morgan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Stuck on what to do

In article , "One Step
Beyond" wrote:

My problem. I find that I simply cannot, no matter how hard I try, run
further than about a mile after getting off the bike. My legs are complete
jelly and I feel strange and wobbly.


Sounds like you are going too hard on the bike. Go over to
www.coachgordo.com and do some reading on the forum. Slow down on the
bike for a better run.

clm in sf

--

cathy morgan, san francisco, ca
REMOVE x x to email
  #10  
Old September 16th 03, 08:35 AM
Ian Lilly
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Stuck on what to do

Cathy Morgan wrote:

In article , "One Step
Beyond" wrote:

My problem. I find that I simply cannot, no matter how hard I try, run
further than about a mile after getting off the bike. My legs are complete
jelly and I feel strange and wobbly.



Sounds like you are going too hard on the bike. Go over to
www.coachgordo.com and do some reading on the forum. Slow down on the
bike for a better run.

clm in sf

I'd second this opinion. I had a mate who did the Australian Ironman
every year and every year he'd get better and better on the cycle leg
but "blow up" still earlier on the run. Finally the message got through
and he paced himself on the ride, did it 20+ minutes more slowly than
his previous best BUT his run time was 90+ mins better than his best
ever. His comment "it's amazing the time you can make up when you can
run the whole leg!"

I found my big improvement in running came with my doing regular (at
least once each week but eventually after almost every ride) "brick"
sessions.

Good luck

Ian

 




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