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Packet meals, pouch meals and tins and other stuff



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 8th 04, 07:38 PM
Rik
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Default Packet meals, pouch meals and tins and other stuff

with a lot of dried stuff you can cut the cooking time down by pre-soaking
the meal, leave it in a covered pan while you are out walking, and other
stuff I bring to the boil, cover in a plastic bag, and put in my sleeping
bag. This retains the heat and lets the meal cook itself (works well with
easy cook rice).

I must admit to being a fan of the 24hour army ration packs, they are great
for an overnight camp, but lets not forget that you can get some great meals
in a can these days.

I've been hill walking on and off for about 35 years and things have changed
a lot. As a kid, breakfast was porridge with dried milk and sugar,
sometimes fried spam and beans. Dried food was either a Vesta Beef Rissoto
/ curry or an expensive Batchelor's dried meal (anyone remember those?)
designed for the climber. Tinned beans, rice pud were also popular and
corned beef was the king of meats, great with a packet of smash and dried
instant peas. I love many of the newer changes in walking, Gortex for
instance is great, nylon tents can be good (I still prefer a Vango Force
Ten, cotton model in really bad weather, they stay standing while other
people are chasing dome tents across the valley), but a lot of new gear
seems a rip off.

Platypus water bags are good but,,,,,,, whats wrong with a couple of empty
pop/water bottles distributed in your pack

GPS are fantastic, but when the batteries go flat you need a map and compass

Pouch meals taste good, but at 3 or 4 a go, I prefer a tin of all day
breakfast or Chicken Curry (99p at Iceland)

and if I'm "car" camping, corned beef stew is still tops.

So any thoughts on new gear V old?
Food ideas?
Stoves?


All the best

Rik


  #2  
Old August 8th 04, 08:48 PM
Judith
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Default Packet meals, pouch meals and tins and other stuff

On Sun, 8 Aug 2004 17:38:50 +0000 (UTC), "Rik"
wrote:

So any thoughts on new gear V old?
Food ideas?
Stoves?


I have three stoves. An MSR Pocket Rocket, a Camping Gaz Bluet and a
folding, hexamine-block stove.

When I got the Pocket Rocket I thought it was brilliant. It was so
small; so light; so powerful. This is my backpacking stove and it
does the job perfectly.

However! I've been car camping twice in the last couple of months and
used the Camping Gaz stove. It's so stable; it's got a good built-in
wind-shield; it can safely take bigger pans than the Pocket Rocket.
It would be awful to take backpacking!

As for the hexamine stove. OW! Burnt fingers again!..... and the
bloody thing's gone out.....OW! no it hasn't. Still, I have used it
for a weekend's camping and don't remember going hungry.

Judith

  #3  
Old August 8th 04, 10:45 PM
Phil Cook
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Default Packet meals, pouch meals and tins and other stuff

On Sun, 8 Aug 2004 17:38:50 +0000 (UTC), Rik wrote:

(I still prefer a Vango Force
Ten, cotton model in really bad weather, they stay standing while other
people are chasing dome tents across the valley)


Try telling Ian that! His F10 was the one that collapsed on the Gower
Meet.
--
Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"

  #4  
Old August 9th 04, 09:34 AM
simplesimon
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Default Packet meals, pouch meals and tins and other stuff



So any thoughts on new gear V old?


Gear both old and new is fine by me as long as its functional. I have a pair
of Scarpa Mantas that are on their second re-sole. The uppers have been
cosmetically trashed by 2000+ miles of bog/heather/dust/mud/rock/water/cow
****/snow but they remain perfectly functional

Food ideas?


For short camping trips I tend to live on Wayfarer Or Army Surplus 'boil in
the bag' meals. Longer backpacking trips tend to be based on an instant hot
oat breakfast, trail snacks for lunch and a large pasta or noodle 'thing'
for an evening meal.

Stoves?


I've used a Trangia for years but rather like the look of the new Brasslite
stoves

simon


  #5  
Old August 30th 04, 10:27 AM
W. D. Grey
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In article , Rik
writes
GPS are fantastic, but when the batteries go flat you need a map and compass


I know I'm late replying !!!

The rest of your posting was good but the above statement is quite wrong
- VERY wrong.

When your batteries run down, you need batteries (the spare set in your
pack) NOT a map and compass. I'm not saying don't take a map and
compass because GPS just adds to the system as an extra aid.


Do you believe that when a car runs out of petrol then you need a trusty
old bike ?
--
Bill Grey
http://www.billboy.co.uk
 




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