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Advice on walking shoes



 
 
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  #11  
Old April 17th 06, 10:57 AM posted to uk.rec.walking
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Default Advice on walking shoes

Phil Clark wrote:
I'm a bit of a newbie here, so apologies if this is something that's
been discussed a few times before...

I've been doing some walking as part of my fitness programme. I have
built up the distances so I can do c 12 miles in an afternoon and not
feel too bad the next day, although I haven't yet tried a long walk
two days in a row (although I sometimes do a short walk the second day
to loosen up those tired muscles).

My only problem is I am getting sore feet. It's not a case of
blisters, broken skin etc, although it was to start with - it feels
more like bruising to the sole and, to a lesser extend, heel. I am
using a pair of lightweight Brasher walking boots, only a lot of my
walking is on canal towpaths and the like, which are often cinder
tracks or tarmacked. So I'm thinking that my walking boots do not
support my feet in the right way for walking on hard, flat surfaces,
and possibly do not cushion my feet in the right way.

So I decided I would look for some decent race-walking type shoes
which presumably would be optimised for track and road work. I looked
on the New Balance website and they do a huge range of walking shoes,
with shock-absorbing soles etc etc. However, none of their suppliers
in London and the South East seem to stock their walking range, only
their running shoes. I am not prepared to buy online as I have odd
sized feet (and in any case I much prefer to try shoes on).

Can anyone advise me what might be suitable and where I can get it?
Are "trail walking" shoes appropriate, or would they be for rougher
(and softer) ground than I want?

And are there any useful web forums out there that might be some use?

Too many questions...

Cheers,

Phil

I bought a pair of fabric 'trail boots' a cross between walking
boots and glorified trainers for those trail walks. To be honest
they weren't that good, they weren't as comfortable as either
proper boots or trainers.

I ended up with a pair of Clarks walking/trekking shoes, leather
with air cushioned soles and support in the right places. They
also have a Gortex liner but that's not why I bought them. They
were called something like 'Adventurer' and cost about 120-130
at the time. They are fantastic, I can walk all day in them and
my feet never ache. They seem to have cavities in the sole and
heel, as you put your heel down the air, or whatever's in there,
is forced into the sole cavity. When you bend your foot it's
forced back into the heel to provide cushioning.

A friend has a pair of Merrell trail shoes that have a vibram
sole that he swears by.

--
Regards

Nick
  #12  
Old April 17th 06, 11:18 AM posted to uk.rec.walking
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Default Advice on walking shoes

Try the area around Covent Garden (off Southampton Rd?) theres quite a few
walking gear shops that would fit the bill and have a few bargains


"Phil Clark" wrote in message
...
On 16 Apr 2006 14:31:28 -0700, "AndyP" wrote:

Millions of people find running shoes good for walking in. I prefer
them to the supposedly more walking specific shoes from Salomon &
Columbia that I've used but I haven't tried the New Balance ones.
There's a dealer locator on the following site which appears to be
specifically for their walking shoes.

http://www.newbalance.co.uk/walkthew...s-London.shtml


I know... on following the links, they're all for shops that
specialise in running and none of the London ones seem to stock any of
the walking shoes, except for the one that's an implant in Harrods,
which only stocks the women's shoes that are recommended for the
Moonwalk.

It was this that persuaded me I ought to try New Balance... if they're
publicising them for novices to walk a marathon in, they must have
something going for them... unfortunately you can't buy them anywhere.
I emailed them, but got no reply.

I'm now thinking along the lines of trail running shoes, I will visit
one of the outdoors shops and try some on.



  #13  
Old April 17th 06, 12:11 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
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Default Advice on walking shoes

In article , Nick Mason
writes
I bought a pair of fabric 'trail boots' a cross between walking boots
and glorified trainers for those trail walks. To be honest they weren't
that good, they weren't as comfortable as either proper boots or
trainers.


Now is the time Chris Townsend should give his opinion of trail shoes
:-)
--
Bill Grey
http://www.billboy.co.uk
  #14  
Old April 17th 06, 03:49 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
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Default Advice on walking shoes

In article , Peter Clinch
writes
W. D. Grey wrote:

Now is the time Chris Townsend should give his opinion of trail shoes :-)


His usual opinion is backed up with advice, with which I heartily
agree, that fit is the important factor, rather than a "Brand X is the
one you want" approach.

Pete.


I was thinking more of his very positive opinion of trail shoes - He has
stated that he does most of his walking in trail/approach shoes rather
than boots.

I agree with you about his opinions in general.
--
Bill Grey
http://www.billboy.co.uk
  #15  
Old April 17th 06, 10:36 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
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Default Advice on walking shoes

The only thing I would add to the good advice above is that you might
want to experiment with sock combinations to find the right one for you.
I would certainly recommend that you try two-sock combinations, if you
don't use two already, sizing the shoes to fit of course.

The construction of the socks matters as well - I find Thor-lo's to be
excellent in relieving my older (and so less well-padded) feet from
aches the next day.

I have been using two pairs of socks from very early in my walking
career, having found that it works for me - longer internal ones that
move with my feet, shorter (cheap wool mix) ones that move with the
boot/shoe. The Thor-lo's are used next to the skin.

But at the end of the day it is what works for you. Just remember that
it is another variable in the foot comfort equation :-)
  #16  
Old April 18th 06, 08:55 AM posted to uk.rec.walking
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Default Advice on walking shoes

Alan Dicey wrote:
The only thing I would add to the good advice above is that you might
want to experiment with sock combinations to find the right one for you.
I would certainly recommend that you try two-sock combinations, if you
don't use two already, sizing the shoes to fit of course.


With good modern socks I actually prefer one pair to two. I used to
walk in two pairs as that was what you did back then, and with boots
sized accordingly that was what fitted best, but these days 1 pair of
something like Thor-Los or Bridgedales is what I find works best.

But at the end of the day it is what works for you. Just remember that
it is another variable in the foot comfort equation :-)


Good advice!

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
  #17  
Old April 18th 06, 11:12 AM posted to uk.rec.walking
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Default Advice on walking shoes


Phil Clark wrote:
Can anyone advise me what might be suitable and where I can get it?
Are "trail walking" shoes appropriate, or would they be for rougher
(and softer) ground than I want?



Hi Phil

Yesterday I picked up a pair of Karrimor Summit shoes for 20.99
instead of 70 at SoccerWorld.

I think that the tide is turning, even the TGO editorial was
questioning the need for boots.

Why have clumpy heavy boots when you can be lightfooted when on the
fells?

The above Karrimor Summits now join already tried and tested Salomon
(can't remember the model) and are my footware of choice with the
exception of cold, wet, swampy, boggy conditions when I still prefer
boots plus gaitors.

Regards David.

  #18  
Old April 18th 06, 08:21 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
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Default Advice on walking shoes

Phil Clark wrote:
walking is on canal towpaths and the like, which are often cinder
tracks or tarmacked. So I'm thinking that my walking boots do not
support my feet in the right way for walking on hard, flat surfaces,
and possibly do not cushion my feet in the right way.


An alternative may be to change the places you walk in rather than your
footwear, if that can be made to fit your fitness programme.

I find walking on tow paths and roads extremely hard on the feet (and
on the mind, but that's a different matter) because basically each step
causes friction in excatly the same places. I find walking in more
varied terrain a lot more comfortable, and it isn't necessarily any more
"difficult".

I'll try to get myself down to a large branch of Field & Trek and look


Don't make the mistake and give them your email address - bloody
spammers!
--
Rudi Winter, Aberystwyth, Wales
  #19  
Old April 18th 06, 09:51 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
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Default Advice on walking shoes

Don't make the mistake and give them your email address - bloody
spammers!


It's hardly spam if you've given them permission. Use the unsubscribe
wossname at the bottom of their emails.
  #20  
Old April 19th 06, 02:03 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
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Default Advice on walking shoes

Mark Thompson [email protected]*_turn_up_the_heat_t o_reply*.com wrote:
Don't make the mistake and give them your email address - bloody
spammers!


It's hardly spam if you've given them permission. Use the unsubscribe
wossname at the bottom of their emails.


I didn't and I did. Didn't help.
--
Rudi Winter, Aberystwyth, Wales
 




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