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what exercises load joints and skeleton?



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 2nd 04, 09:03 PM
Rambo Four Sythia
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Default what exercises load joints and skeleton?

Hi. Taking my own advice, I visited Krista's website today. I found
an interesting article about KH's daughter's powerlifting program.

The program took great care at the beginning to avoid exercises that
load the skeleton and joints. What are some of those exercises? The
round-backed good morning is mentioned explicitly. I do the
stiff-legged deadlift with a little rounding (slightly convex lumbar
area in bottom of ROM), which I would think also puts significant
stress on the spine.

What other exercises put more stress on the skeleton and joints?
Jumping and running come to mind, but I'm asking about lifting weights
specifically.

--
R4S
  #2  
Old May 2nd 04, 09:12 PM
Keith Hobman
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Posts: n/a
Default what exercises load joints and skeleton?

In article , Rambo Four Sythia
wrote:

Hi. Taking my own advice, I visited Krista's website today. I found
an interesting article about KH's daughter's powerlifting program.

The program took great care at the beginning to avoid exercises that
load the skeleton and joints. What are some of those exercises? The
round-backed good morning is mentioned explicitly. I do the
stiff-legged deadlift with a little rounding (slightly convex lumbar
area in bottom of ROM), which I would think also puts significant
stress on the spine.

What other exercises put more stress on the skeleton and joints?
Jumping and running come to mind, but I'm asking about lifting weights
specifically.


My concern was more for preparation of Meghan's motor patterns and
musculature to protect her spine. So we would try and do exercises which
taught her to keep an arched back and worked her lumbar muscles where if
she got tired she wouldn't have a lower back disaster.

So we would do a lot of hypers and reverse hypers, for example, instead of
bar work. Core work like leg raises.
  #3  
Old May 2nd 04, 09:12 PM
Keith Hobman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default what exercises load joints and skeleton?

In article , Rambo Four Sythia
wrote:

Hi. Taking my own advice, I visited Krista's website today. I found
an interesting article about KH's daughter's powerlifting program.

The program took great care at the beginning to avoid exercises that
load the skeleton and joints. What are some of those exercises? The
round-backed good morning is mentioned explicitly. I do the
stiff-legged deadlift with a little rounding (slightly convex lumbar
area in bottom of ROM), which I would think also puts significant
stress on the spine.

What other exercises put more stress on the skeleton and joints?
Jumping and running come to mind, but I'm asking about lifting weights
specifically.


My concern was more for preparation of Meghan's motor patterns and
musculature to protect her spine. So we would try and do exercises which
taught her to keep an arched back and worked her lumbar muscles where if
she got tired she wouldn't have a lower back disaster.

So we would do a lot of hypers and reverse hypers, for example, instead of
bar work. Core work like leg raises.
  #6  
Old May 2nd 04, 10:53 PM
Art S
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default what exercises load joints and skeleton?


"Rambo Four Sythia" wrote in message ...
Hi. Taking my own advice, I visited Krista's website today. I found
an interesting article about KH's daughter's powerlifting program.

The program took great care at the beginning to avoid exercises that
load the skeleton and joints. What are some of those exercises? The
round-backed good morning is mentioned explicitly. I do the
stiff-legged deadlift with a little rounding (slightly convex lumbar
area in bottom of ROM), which I would think also puts significant
stress on the spine.

What other exercises put more stress on the skeleton and joints?
Jumping and running come to mind, but I'm asking about lifting weights
specifically.


Um. Basically, when you are evaluating exercises for whether or
not they will help increase bone density, look at the portions of the
skeleton that are being "compressed" by the weight. As an example,
when you do a deadlift your skeleton from your shoulders down to
your feet are being "compressed". Head, neck, and arms are not
being "compressed". Same for standing calf raises. (I have never
gotten a clear answer [from anyone who is knowledgeable] about
whether pulling motions or curling motions would stress the bones
properly, which is why I am excluding them.)

Also, similar to muscle, bone gets stronger only when it has a peak
load that is "high enough" to stress it. No, I don't know what "high
enough" translates to.

Take a look at http://www.stumptuous.com/bonebuilding.html

Is this question just for general knowledge, or is there a reason
behind it?

Art




  #7  
Old May 2nd 04, 10:53 PM
Art S
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default what exercises load joints and skeleton?


"Rambo Four Sythia" wrote in message ...
Hi. Taking my own advice, I visited Krista's website today. I found
an interesting article about KH's daughter's powerlifting program.

The program took great care at the beginning to avoid exercises that
load the skeleton and joints. What are some of those exercises? The
round-backed good morning is mentioned explicitly. I do the
stiff-legged deadlift with a little rounding (slightly convex lumbar
area in bottom of ROM), which I would think also puts significant
stress on the spine.

What other exercises put more stress on the skeleton and joints?
Jumping and running come to mind, but I'm asking about lifting weights
specifically.


Um. Basically, when you are evaluating exercises for whether or
not they will help increase bone density, look at the portions of the
skeleton that are being "compressed" by the weight. As an example,
when you do a deadlift your skeleton from your shoulders down to
your feet are being "compressed". Head, neck, and arms are not
being "compressed". Same for standing calf raises. (I have never
gotten a clear answer [from anyone who is knowledgeable] about
whether pulling motions or curling motions would stress the bones
properly, which is why I am excluding them.)

Also, similar to muscle, bone gets stronger only when it has a peak
load that is "high enough" to stress it. No, I don't know what "high
enough" translates to.

Take a look at http://www.stumptuous.com/bonebuilding.html

Is this question just for general knowledge, or is there a reason
behind it?

Art




  #8  
Old May 2nd 04, 11:21 PM
Rambo Four Sythia
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default what exercises load joints and skeleton?

"Art S" writes:

"Rambo Four Sythia" wrote in message ...

....
What other exercises put more stress on the skeleton and joints?

....
Is this question just for general knowledge, or is there a reason
behind it?


Both, I guess. What if someday I have a child who wants to learn
powerlifting?

--
R4S
  #9  
Old May 2nd 04, 11:21 PM
Rambo Four Sythia
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default what exercises load joints and skeleton?

"Art S" writes:

"Rambo Four Sythia" wrote in message ...

....
What other exercises put more stress on the skeleton and joints?

....
Is this question just for general knowledge, or is there a reason
behind it?


Both, I guess. What if someday I have a child who wants to learn
powerlifting?

--
R4S
 




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