A Fitness & exercise forum. FitnessBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » FitnessBanter.com forum » Fitness & Exercise » Running
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Effect of weight on speed



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old February 12th 04, 04:52 PM
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Effect of weight on speed

Having trouble googling for this but I presume someone has done
a study.

Is there a documented relationship between your running speed
and your weight, all other variables remaining the same? i.e.
if you magically lost 2kg of fat overnight, how much faster
would you be the day after? I imagine that just attaching a
rucksack with different weights doesn't accurately represent
the same thing but it might be interesting nevertheless.

Paul
  #2  
Old February 12th 04, 05:02 PM
What?\ she whispered, \D'you think that'll work?
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Effect of weight on speed

On 12 Feb 2004 16:52:29 GMT, wrote:

I imagine that just attaching a
rucksack with different weights doesn't accurately represent
the same thing but it might be interesting nevertheless.


Y'think? I'd imagine it to be a complete waste of scarce research
funds.
  #4  
Old February 12th 04, 05:30 PM
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Effect of weight on speed


Well, obviously if you are lighter you will run faster...to a
point. There are two "minimum weights" many people encounter.
One is the "indeal racing weight" and the other the "ideal training
weight". The training weight is higher...during training (especially
for marathons) the body is under great stress and in a constant state
of recovery and repair. The body must have adequate resources to
complete these tasks. If one is too light, their body will be under
an additional stress and not recover as quickly.
The ideal racing weight is lower. This is typically the lowest
a person can weight and not feel weak or start losing a lot of
muscle. In preparation for a race, mileage is typically lowered,
removing stress from the body and allowing the loss of a few
additional pounds below ideal training weight.
But there is still a minimum. Many runners fall victim to
anorexic-like tendancies, thinking that lower is always better.
Using myself for an example, my ideal training weight is about
147-150. Any heavier and I notice it slows me down; any lighter
and I have recovery problems. My ideal racing weight is 145; however
I can rarely reach that for marathons since I can't lose weight
during a taper and still recover. I normally only reach 145 for
a goal 10K or half.
Andy Hass
  #5  
Old February 12th 04, 05:56 PM
eNo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Effect of weight on speed

wrote in message
...

Well, obviously if you are lighter you will run faster...to a
point. There are two "minimum weights" many people encounter.
One is the "indeal racing weight" and the other the "ideal training
weight". The training weight is higher...during training (especially
for marathons) the body is under great stress and in a constant state
of recovery and repair. The body must have adequate resources to
complete these tasks. If one is too light, their body will be under
an additional stress and not recover as quickly.


This is a great point. I'm about 10 lb. heavier this year than I was about a
year ago, when I ran a marathon. Just now, I'm beginning to run at speeds
comparable to what I was doing back then (in speed and/or tempo workouts). I
feel stronger now than I did then, and I can tell my body recovers faster. I
still have some fat I'd like to lose, especially around the middle, but I
bet some of that "extra" 10 lb. is muscle (my body fat % is about the same
it was last year), so your comment about ideal training weight has be
thinking I shouldn't fret so much. It would be nice not to be lugging it
around during a race or long run, though .

snip
--
`,,,,`,,,,`,,,,` `,,,,
eNo
"If you can't go fast, go long."
`,,,,`,,,,`,,,,` `,,,,


  #6  
Old February 12th 04, 07:12 PM
SwStudio
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Effect of weight on speed

wrote in message

Well, obviously if you are lighter you will run faster...to a
point. There are two "minimum weights" many people encounter.
One is the "indeal racing weight" and the other the "ideal training
weight". The training weight is higher...during training (especially
for marathons) the body is under great stress and in a constant state
of recovery and repair. The body must have adequate resources to
complete these tasks. If one is too light, their body will be under
an additional stress and not recover as quickly.
The ideal racing weight is lower. This is typically the lowest
a person can weight and not feel weak or start losing a lot of
muscle. In preparation for a race, mileage is typically lowered,
removing stress from the body and allowing the loss of a few
additional pounds below ideal training weight.
But there is still a minimum. Many runners fall victim to
anorexic-like tendancies, thinking that lower is always better.
Using myself for an example, my ideal training weight is about
147-150. Any heavier and I notice it slows me down; any lighter
and I have recovery problems. My ideal racing weight is 145; however
I can rarely reach that for marathons since I can't lose weight
during a taper and still recover. I normally only reach 145 for
a goal 10K or half.
Andy Hass


Yes, I agree with all of this. My training weight is about 134 - 136lbs,
and I like to race in the 130 - 132 range. I've tried dipping slightly
below 130lbs and that's when the negative effects you mentioned start
to occur.

I don't worry as much about weight as the race distance increases; as
I think I need a little more weight for that... for a marathon I think I'd
race best at about 134... around my lowest ideal 'training' weight. But
yeah, I like racing 5k's in a slightly 'hungry' state for sure.

cheers,
--
David (in Hamilton, ON)
www.allfalldown.org


  #7  
Old February 12th 04, 07:44 PM
DrLith
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Effect of weight on speed

wrote in message
...
Having trouble googling for this but I presume someone has done
a study.

Is there a documented relationship between your running speed
and your weight, all other variables remaining the same? i.e.
if you magically lost 2kg of fat overnight, how much faster
would you be the day after? I imagine that just attaching a
rucksack with different weights doesn't accurately represent
the same thing but it might be interesting nevertheless.


You might reference a thread from a few months prior on this newsgroup,
available on Google at
http://www.google.com/groups?hl=en&l...dm=13360-3FB13
88A-136%40storefull-2338.public.lawson.webtv.net&rnum=1&prev=/groups%3Fhl%3D
en%26lr%3D%26ie%3DUTF-8%26oe%3DUTF-8%26selm%3D13360-3FB1388A-136%2540storefu
ll-2338.public.lawson.webtv.net. The post by Kerry Wilson contains a link to
a site that I found interesting in this regard. The site
(http://zhurnal.net/ww/zw?HandicapJogging) mentions a traditional belief
that a pound of excess weight corresponds to roughly a 2-sec/mi handicap. He
does not, unfortunately, offer any research to back that up, but it seems
within the realm of reason.

Another rule of thumb I've seen, equally undocumented, is that you can
expect a similar percentage gain in performance as the percentage of body
mass decrease. So, if you lose about 10% of your body mass, you can expect
about a 10% increase in speed.

The question, of course (if you're close to a reasonable weight) is, where
does "excess" weight end and "necessary" weight begin?


  #8  
Old February 12th 04, 08:27 PM
Lyndon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Effect of weight on speed

Having trouble googling for this but I presume someone has done
a study.

Is there a documented relationship between your running speed
and your weight, all other variables remaining the same? i.e.
if you magically lost 2kg of fat overnight, how much faster
would you be the day after? I imagine that just attaching a
rucksack with different weights doesn't accurately represent
the same thing but it might be interesting nevertheless.

Paul

Below are Jack Daniels' "Oxygen Power" equations:

pct_max= 0.8 + 0.1894393 * exp(-0.012778 * time ) + 0.2989558 *
exp(-0.1932605 * time)
vo2 = -4.60 + 0.182258 * velocity + 0.000104 * velocity^2

vo2max = vo2/pct_max

Where velocity is in meters/minute for a particular race distance and time is
time in minutes for a particular race distance. Relative VO2max is in units of
ml*kg^-1*min^-1.

The equations do not include weight. However, you can take a particular race
time, such as a 40 minute 10K, and scale the relative VO2max for a change in
relative VO2max due to weight. You can adjust for whatever weight you want.
For a 160 lb male starting with a 40 min 10K time, the projected improvement
just from reducing weight would come to roughly 13 seconds per pound, which is
relatively close to some rules of thumb.

However, as Andy noted, there is an ideal training/racing weight for each
individual and improvement beyond this point will not result in improved
results.

Lyndon


"Speed Kills...It kills those that don't have it!" --US Olympic Track Coach
Brooks Johnson

  #9  
Old February 12th 04, 09:34 PM
Brian Wakem
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Effect of weight on speed

SwStudio wrote:

wrote in message

Well, obviously if you are lighter you will run faster...to a
point. There are two "minimum weights" many people encounter.
One is the "indeal racing weight" and the other the "ideal training
weight". The training weight is higher...during training (especially
for marathons) the body is under great stress and in a constant state
of recovery and repair. The body must have adequate resources to
complete these tasks. If one is too light, their body will be under
an additional stress and not recover as quickly.
The ideal racing weight is lower. This is typically the lowest
a person can weight and not feel weak or start losing a lot of
muscle. In preparation for a race, mileage is typically lowered,
removing stress from the body and allowing the loss of a few
additional pounds below ideal training weight.
But there is still a minimum. Many runners fall victim to
anorexic-like tendancies, thinking that lower is always better.
Using myself for an example, my ideal training weight is about
147-150. Any heavier and I notice it slows me down; any lighter
and I have recovery problems. My ideal racing weight is 145; however
I can rarely reach that for marathons since I can't lose weight
during a taper and still recover. I normally only reach 145 for
a goal 10K or half.
Andy Hass


Yes, I agree with all of this. My training weight is about 134 - 136lbs,
and I like to race in the 130 - 132 range. I've tried dipping slightly
below 130lbs and that's when the negative effects you mentioned start
to occur.

I don't worry as much about weight as the race distance increases; as
I think I need a little more weight for that... for a marathon I think I'd
race best at about 134... around my lowest ideal 'training' weight. But
yeah, I like racing 5k's in a slightly 'hungry' state for sure.

cheers,



I seem to be the opposite to you and Andy, my racing weight is always higher
than my training weight. I'm usually in the 146 - 149 range but when I
taper and carbo load I normally rise to 149 - 151.


--
Brian Wakem
  #10  
Old February 12th 04, 10:35 PM
SwStudio
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Effect of weight on speed

"Brian Wakem" wrote in message
I seem to be the opposite to you and Andy, my racing weight is always

higher
than my training weight. I'm usually in the 146 - 149 range but when I
taper and carbo load I normally rise to 149 - 151.



Interesting.... is this your usual plan for a 5k? I could see your
point of view in a marathon or even 10 miler. Don't you find
you're a little less sluggish in the shorter road race distances when
a little lighter?


cheers,
--
David (in Hamilton, ON)
www.allfalldown.org


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Weight gain side effect of anti-psychotics elzinator Weights 8 March 1st 04 05:51 PM
Help! 800cal/day = good diet or ED? "Eat less, do more" not working? VLCD trap? vlcd_hell Weights 126 February 7th 04 12:21 AM
Low carb diets Weights 194 January 8th 04 11:15 PM
Volleyball workout advice The Fonz Weights 80 December 29th 03 03:59 AM
Diet/exercise question George Weights 201 November 5th 03 04:25 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:19 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 FitnessBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.