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Measuring Resting Heart Rate



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 19th 04, 02:12 AM
Nikko Bretsur
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Default Measuring Resting Heart Rate

Hi:

I have a question about how/when to measure resting heart rate. If I
measure my pulse when sitting idly, say while using a computer, it is often
in the low-to-mid 80's. However, if I measure it after laying in bed for a
while (while waiting to fall asleep, for example) it is generally 63 or 64.
For the purposes of comparing to general web-published guidelines for
fitness, which of these should be considered my resting pulse?

Thanks,

Nick


  #2  
Old January 19th 04, 03:45 AM
alien
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Default Measuring Resting Heart Rate

"Nikko Bretsur" wrote in
m:

Hi:

I have a question about how/when to measure resting heart rate. If I
measure my pulse when sitting idly, say while using a computer, it is
often in the low-to-mid 80's. However, if I measure it after laying
in bed for a while (while waiting to fall asleep, for example) it is
generally 63 or 64. For the purposes of comparing to general
web-published guidelines for fitness, which of these should be
considered my resting pulse?

Thanks,

Nick




i would concider it any moment when you are void of movement for atleast
3 or so minutes. i always take my pulse when i first wake up before i get
out of bed. (around 51 BPM) then after i get up i will take my pulse
again after ive been up for atleast an hour while setting at my desk.
(around 58-60 BPM) i would concider both of these a resting heart rate.
but i use the first one for my charts.

365/223/200
  #3  
Old January 21st 04, 08:20 AM
Joe User
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Default Measuring Resting Heart Rate

"Nikko Bretsur" wrote:
I have a question about how/when to measure resting heart rate. If I
measure my pulse when sitting idly, say while using a computer, it is often
in the low-to-mid 80's. However, if I measure it after laying in bed for a
while (while waiting to fall asleep, for example) it is generally 63 or 64.
For the purposes of comparing to general web-published guidelines for
fitness, which of these should be considered my resting pulse?


In your case, the HR that you measure while trying to fall asleep.

The resting HR is the HR when your body is in a relaxed state. For
most people, that is best determined when you wake up in the morning
and before any activity.

(However, beware that many factors can elevate or artificailly reduce
even your morning HR, such as a stressful or short night's sleep,
some medications, etc. So you should determine your morning HR only
when you know that you are truly naturally relaxed.)

Some people are able to achieve their resting HR midday by simply
relaxing for some number of minutes -- typically 20-30 min. It is
unlikely that you can achieve your resting HR with only a few minutes
of relaxation. But obviously some people are better at achieving a
relaxed state than others.

Nonetheless, clearly that is not true for you, with at least a 20-beat
difference. That is not unusual. Many people cannot put their mind
at ease in the middle of the day.

Even your bedtime HR might not be a true resting HR if you are
stressed out from the day, for example. Try comparing your bedtime
HR with your morning HR, averaged over several days.
  #4  
Old January 24th 04, 06:25 PM
ASIrelan
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Default Measuring Resting Heart Rate

alien wrote in message ...
"Nikko Bretsur" wrote in
m:

Hi:

I have a question about how/when to measure resting heart rate. If I
measure my pulse when sitting idly, say while using a computer, it is
often in the low-to-mid 80's. However, if I measure it after laying
in bed for a while (while waiting to fall asleep, for example) it is
generally 63 or 64. For the purposes of comparing to general
web-published guidelines for fitness, which of these should be
considered my resting pulse?

Thanks,

Nick




i would concider it any moment when you are void of movement for atleast
3 or so minutes. i always take my pulse when i first wake up before i get
out of bed. (around 51 BPM) then after i get up i will take my pulse
again after ive been up for atleast an hour while setting at my desk.
(around 58-60 BPM) i would concider both of these a resting heart rate.
but i use the first one for my charts.

365/223/200


From what I have read in books about fitness. They says it best to
take your resting heart rate before you get out of bed..such as when
you wake up naturally without the alarming going off and startling you
makeing your heart rate increase. With the daily stress in our lives
nowdays when you take it as you are laying in bed before you fall
asleep you are still thinking about items that when on that day and
could have upset you..those things could cause your heart rate to be
high.
 




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