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Why Your Muscle Pumps Have Nothing To Do With Your Muscle Gains



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 29th 07, 04:20 AM posted to misc.fitness.weights
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Why Your Muscle Pumps Have Nothing To Do With Your Muscle Gains

Your back is firmly planted on the bench as you wrap your chalked
hands around the cold, steel bar. Your training partner helps you un-
rack the weight as you power the bar up and down, squeezing your chest
and triceps on each grueling rep. You complete your 6 repetitions, re-
rack the bar and stand up.

Your chest feels tight and engorged with blood. You take a look in the
mirror, thrilled with how full and vascular your pecs appear. You feel
strong, powerful, healthy and motivated to blast through the rest of
your workout with your newly achieved "pump".

Let's face it, a pump feels incredible. For those of you who aren't
quite sure what I'm talking about, a pump is the feeling that you get
as blood becomes trapped inside your muscle tissue as a result of
resistance training. The muscles will swell up and increase in size,
vascularity and tightness.

There is certainly nothing wrong with achieving a pump in the gym, and
it is simply a natural result of intense weight training. However,
contrary to what the majority of weightlifters may think, a pump is in
no way indicative of a successful workout. Anyone who uses the
intensity of their pump as a gauge for the effectiveness of their
workout is making a costly error.

On countless occasions I've heard lifters raving about the massive
pumps they get in the gym as they share methods for achieving the best
pump possible. "Dude, this will give you a crazy pump!" If you have
already been working out for a decent amount of time then you know
exactly what I'm talking about. While a pump does feel extremely
satisfying, just remember that it means very little in terms of muscle
stimulation and growth.

A pump is simply the result of extra blood within the muscle tissue.
Think of it this way: if I took a pair of 10 pound dumbbells and
performed 300 reps of a bench press movement, I would achieve an
incredible pump. If muscle pumps meant muscle growth, then super light
weight, ultra high rep programs would be the most effective way to
grow. Any serious lifter with half a brain knows that this simply is
not the case.

Do you want to know how to truly gauge the success of a workout? Here
it is...

Take your workout records (in terms of weight and reps) from the
previous week and compare it to the current week. Did you improve?
Were you able to either increase the resistance slightly on each
exercise, or perform an extra rep or two?

If so, you had a successful workout, regardless of how much blood you
were able to pump into your muscle tissue.

Building muscle mass and strength is all about training with 100%
intensity on every given set and then striving to improve from week to
week. If you are able to consistently achieve this, your muscle size
and strength will increase faster than you ever thought possible, with
or without a pump.

I hope this article cleared up your confusion on the issue of "muscle
pumps". There's so much misleading muscle-building information
circling around on the Internet these days that it can sometimes be
impossible to know who to listen to. If you want to learn the truth
about other common, counterproductive "myths", visit my blog below...

http://tipsforbuildingmuscle.blogspot.com/

  #2  
Old May 29th 07, 07:53 AM posted to misc.fitness.weights
Hard Bop Drums
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 762
Default Why Your Muscle Pumps Have Nothing To Do With Your Muscle Gains

wrote in message
oups.com...
Your back is firmly planted on the bench as you wrap your chalked
hands around the cold, steel bar. Your training partner helps you un-
rack the weight as you power the bar up and down, squeezing your chest
and triceps on each grueling rep. You complete your 6 repetitions, re-
rack the bar and stand up.

Your chest feels tight and engorged with blood. You take a look in the
mirror, thrilled with how full and vascular your pecs appear. You feel
strong, powerful, healthy and motivated to blast through the rest of
your workout with your newly achieved "pump".

Let's face it, a pump feels incredible. For those of you who aren't
quite sure what I'm talking about, a pump is the feeling that you get
as blood becomes trapped inside your muscle tissue as a result of
resistance training. The muscles will swell up and increase in size,
vascularity and tightness.

There is certainly nothing wrong with achieving a pump in the gym, and
it is simply a natural result of intense weight training. However,
contrary to what the majority of weightlifters may think, a pump is in
no way indicative of a successful workout. Anyone who uses the
intensity of their pump as a gauge for the effectiveness of their
workout is making a costly error.

On countless occasions I've heard lifters raving about the massive
pumps they get in the gym as they share methods for achieving the best
pump possible. "Dude, this will give you a crazy pump!" If you have
already been working out for a decent amount of time then you know
exactly what I'm talking about. While a pump does feel extremely
satisfying, just remember that it means very little in terms of muscle
stimulation and growth.

A pump is simply the result of extra blood within the muscle tissue.
Think of it this way: if I took a pair of 10 pound dumbbells and
performed 300 reps of a bench press movement, I would achieve an
incredible pump. If muscle pumps meant muscle growth, then super light
weight, ultra high rep programs would be the most effective way to
grow. Any serious lifter with half a brain knows that this simply is
not the case.

Do you want to know how to truly gauge the success of a workout? Here
it is...

Take your workout records (in terms of weight and reps) from the
previous week and compare it to the current week. Did you improve?
Were you able to either increase the resistance slightly on each
exercise, or perform an extra rep or two?

If so, you had a successful workout, regardless of how much blood you
were able to pump into your muscle tissue.

Building muscle mass and strength is all about training with 100%
intensity on every given set and then striving to improve from week to
week. If you are able to consistently achieve this, your muscle size
and strength will increase faster than you ever thought possible, with
or without a pump.

I hope this article cleared up your confusion on the issue of "muscle
pumps". There's so much misleading muscle-building information
circling around on the Internet these days that it can sometimes be
impossible to know who to listen to. If you want to learn the truth
about other common, counterproductive "myths", visit my blog below...

http://www.i****littleboys.com/


What a ****ing moron. I wonder how this SPAMMING asshole had the time to
post this in between his numerous daily NAMBLA meetings?



-- --Robert Schuh"Everything that elevates an individual above the herd and
intimidates the neighbour is henceforth called evil; and the fair, modest,
submissive and conforming mentality, the mediocrity of desires attains moral
designations and honors" - Nietzschehttp://www.hardbopdrums.com/


  #3  
Old May 29th 07, 11:49 AM posted to misc.fitness.weights
Pete
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,699
Default Why Your Muscle Pumps Have Nothing To Do With Your Muscle Gains

schreef:

Your chest feels tight and engorged with blood. You take a look in the
mirror, thrilled with how full and vascular your pecs appear. You feel
strong, powerful, healthy and motivated to blast through the rest of
your workout with your newly achieved "pump".


Oh yeah !!! (too much caffeine, sorry...)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m4uGC...elated&search=

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=871VT...elated&search=

Let's face it, a pump feels incredible. For those of you who aren't
quite sure what I'm talking about, a pump is the feeling that you get
as blood becomes trapped inside your muscle tissue as a result of
resistance training. The muscles will swell up and increase in size,
vascularity and tightness.


Oh yeah !!!

There is certainly nothing wrong with achieving a pump in the gym, and
it is simply a natural result of intense weight training. However,
contrary to what the majority of weightlifters may think, a pump is in
no way indicative of a successful workout. Anyone who uses the
intensity of their pump as a gauge for the effectiveness of their
workout is making a costly error.


On countless occasions I've heard lifters raving about the massive
pumps they get in the gym as they share methods for achieving the best
pump possible. "Dude, this will give you a crazy pump!" If you have
already been working out for a decent amount of time then you know
exactly what I'm talking about. While a pump does feel extremely
satisfying, just remember that it means very little in terms of muscle
stimulation and growth.


Hey, dickless... while the pump doesnt EQUAL growth, it sure as hell is a
good INDICATOR that the targeted muscles are worked properly.

A pump is simply the result of extra blood within the muscle tissue.
Think of it this way: if I took a pair of 10 pound dumbbells and
performed 300 reps of a bench press movement, I would achieve an
incredible pump.


Wrong.

A pump is more blood going in then going out. So you get a temporary
surplus. A lot of blood goes in when the conractions are intense. Actually,
MORE blood comes in when the set is finished.

If you do hundreds of reps you will just **** it up. You will flush the
muscle. At one point, the amount of blood going in will equal the amount
going out.

Sets of 12 to 20 are ideal, with 30 being a good max. And isolation
movemenents work better.

I hope this article cleared up your confusion on the issue of "muscle
pumps". There's so much misleading muscle-building information
circling around on the Internet these days that it can sometimes be
impossible to know who to listen to. If you want to learn the truth
about other common, counterproductive "myths", visit my blog below...


Thanks for guiding us...

Pete


  #4  
Old May 29th 07, 05:22 PM posted to misc.fitness.weights
Steve Freides
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,029
Default Why Your Muscle Pumps Have Nothing To Do With Your Muscle Gains

wrote in message
oups.com...
Your back is firmly planted on the bench as you wrap your chalked
hands around the cold, steel bar. Your training partner helps you un-
rack the weight as you power the bar up and down, squeezing your chest
and triceps on each grueling rep. You complete your 6 repetitions, re-
rack the bar and stand up.

Your chest feels tight and engorged with blood. You take a look in the
mirror, thrilled with how full and vascular your pecs appear. You feel
strong, powerful, healthy and motivated to blast through the rest of
your workout with your newly achieved "pump".

Let's face it, a pump feels incredible. For those of you who aren't
quite sure what I'm talking about, a pump is the feeling that you get
as blood becomes trapped inside your muscle tissue as a result of
resistance training. The muscles will swell up and increase in size,
vascularity and tightness.

There is certainly nothing wrong with achieving a pump in the gym, and
it is simply a natural result of intense weight training. However,
contrary to what the majority of weightlifters may think, a pump is in
no way indicative of a successful workout. Anyone who uses the
intensity of their pump as a gauge for the effectiveness of their
workout is making a costly error.

On countless occasions I've heard lifters raving about the massive
pumps they get in the gym as they share methods for achieving the best
pump possible. "Dude, this will give you a crazy pump!" If you have
already been working out for a decent amount of time then you know
exactly what I'm talking about. While a pump does feel extremely
satisfying, just remember that it means very little in terms of muscle
stimulation and growth.

A pump is simply the result of extra blood within the muscle tissue.
Think of it this way: if I took a pair of 10 pound dumbbells and
performed 300 reps of a bench press movement, I would achieve an
incredible pump. If muscle pumps meant muscle growth, then super light
weight, ultra high rep programs would be the most effective way to
grow. Any serious lifter with half a brain knows that this simply is
not the case.

Do you want to know how to truly gauge the success of a workout? Here
it is...

Take your workout records (in terms of weight and reps) from the
previous week and compare it to the current week. Did you improve?
Were you able to either increase the resistance slightly on each
exercise, or perform an extra rep or two?

If so, you had a successful workout, regardless of how much blood you
were able to pump into your muscle tissue.

Building muscle mass and strength is all about training with 100%
intensity on every given set and then striving to improve from week to
week. If you are able to consistently achieve this, your muscle size
and strength will increase faster than you ever thought possible, with
or without a pump.

I hope this article cleared up your confusion on the issue of "muscle
pumps". There's so much misleading muscle-building information
circling around on the Internet these days that it can sometimes be
impossible to know who to listen to. If you want to learn the truth
about other common, counterproductive "myths", visit my blog below...

http://tipsforbuildingmuscle.blogspot.com/


I'm with Rob here. 300 reps of 10 lbs. is a poor example. Almost
anyone wishing to get bigger will work for a pump in their muscles.
While bodybuilders may tend to do it with lighter weights than
powerlifters, a powerlifter doing sets of 3-5 reps on 1-2 minute rests
will also get bigger as he/she gets stronger. There is a continuum -
heavy weights, short sets and long rests on one side, and lighter but
still substantial (let's say greater than 50% 1RM) weights, longer sets,
and shorter rests on the other, and there is no need to come down
absolutely on one end of the spectrum or the other unless your goals
dictate that approach.

The only thing 300 reps of 10 lbs. will cause you to do is eat more of
your favorite snack when your workout is over.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


  #5  
Old May 29th 07, 09:17 PM posted to misc.fitness.weights
Hard Bop Drums
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 762
Default Why Your Muscle Pumps Have Nothing To Do With Your Muscle Gains

"Pete" wrote in message
...
schreef:

Your chest feels tight and engorged with blood. You take a look in the
mirror, thrilled with how full and vascular your pecs appear. You feel
strong, powerful, healthy and motivated to blast through the rest of
your workout with your newly achieved "pump".


Oh yeah !!! (too much caffeine, sorry...)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m4uGC...elated&search=

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=871VT...elated&search=

Let's face it, a pump feels incredible. For those of you who aren't
quite sure what I'm talking about, a pump is the feeling that you get
as blood becomes trapped inside your muscle tissue as a result of
resistance training. The muscles will swell up and increase in size,
vascularity and tightness.


Oh yeah !!!

There is certainly nothing wrong with achieving a pump in the gym, and
it is simply a natural result of intense weight training. However,
contrary to what the majority of weightlifters may think, a pump is in
no way indicative of a successful workout. Anyone who uses the
intensity of their pump as a gauge for the effectiveness of their
workout is making a costly error.


On countless occasions I've heard lifters raving about the massive
pumps they get in the gym as they share methods for achieving the best
pump possible. "Dude, this will give you a crazy pump!" If you have
already been working out for a decent amount of time then you know
exactly what I'm talking about. While a pump does feel extremely
satisfying, just remember that it means very little in terms of muscle
stimulation and growth.


Hey, dickless... while the pump doesnt EQUAL growth, it sure as hell is a
good INDICATOR that the targeted muscles are worked properly.

A pump is simply the result of extra blood within the muscle tissue.
Think of it this way: if I took a pair of 10 pound dumbbells and
performed 300 reps of a bench press movement, I would achieve an
incredible pump.


Wrong.

A pump is more blood going in then going out. So you get a temporary
surplus. A lot of blood goes in when the conractions are intense.
Actually, MORE blood comes in when the set is finished.

If you do hundreds of reps you will just **** it up. You will flush the
muscle. At one point, the amount of blood going in will equal the amount
going out.

Sets of 12 to 20 are ideal, with 30 being a good max. And isolation
movemenents work better.

I hope this article cleared up your confusion on the issue of "muscle
pumps". There's so much misleading muscle-building information
circling around on the Internet these days that it can sometimes be
impossible to know who to listen to. If you want to learn the truth
about other common, counterproductive "myths", visit my blog below...


Thanks for guiding us...

Pete


Pete,
I just looked at the Arnold video. Man, he looked SO much better than the
pros do today. While I am all for things moving forward and guys getting
freaky, I would never want to look like a modern pro. Arnold was big, but he
still looked athletic and a human being. Had I been able to continue to
compete, I would have been more than happy to have gained another 20 lbs or
so. At 5'10 and 220 ripped with my bone structure, I would have been tickled
pink. ;-)

--
Robert Schuh
"Everything that elevates an individual above the herd and
intimidates the neighbour is henceforth called evil; and
the fair, modest, submissive and conforming mentality,
the mediocrity of desires attains moral designations and honors"
- Nietzsche

http://www.hardbopdrums.com/



  #6  
Old May 29th 07, 09:21 PM posted to misc.fitness.weights
Hard Bop Drums
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 762
Default Why Your Muscle Pumps Have Nothing To Do With Your Muscle Gains

"Steve Freides" wrote in message
...
wrote in message
oups.com...
Your back is firmly planted on the bench as you wrap your chalked
hands around the cold, steel bar. Your training partner helps you un-
rack the weight as you power the bar up and down, squeezing your chest
and triceps on each grueling rep. You complete your 6 repetitions, re-
rack the bar and stand up.

Your chest feels tight and engorged with blood. You take a look in the
mirror, thrilled with how full and vascular your pecs appear. You feel
strong, powerful, healthy and motivated to blast through the rest of
your workout with your newly achieved "pump".

Let's face it, a pump feels incredible. For those of you who aren't
quite sure what I'm talking about, a pump is the feeling that you get
as blood becomes trapped inside your muscle tissue as a result of
resistance training. The muscles will swell up and increase in size,
vascularity and tightness.

There is certainly nothing wrong with achieving a pump in the gym, and
it is simply a natural result of intense weight training. However,
contrary to what the majority of weightlifters may think, a pump is in
no way indicative of a successful workout. Anyone who uses the
intensity of their pump as a gauge for the effectiveness of their
workout is making a costly error.

On countless occasions I've heard lifters raving about the massive
pumps they get in the gym as they share methods for achieving the best
pump possible. "Dude, this will give you a crazy pump!" If you have
already been working out for a decent amount of time then you know
exactly what I'm talking about. While a pump does feel extremely
satisfying, just remember that it means very little in terms of muscle
stimulation and growth.

A pump is simply the result of extra blood within the muscle tissue.
Think of it this way: if I took a pair of 10 pound dumbbells and
performed 300 reps of a bench press movement, I would achieve an
incredible pump. If muscle pumps meant muscle growth, then super light
weight, ultra high rep programs would be the most effective way to
grow. Any serious lifter with half a brain knows that this simply is
not the case.

Do you want to know how to truly gauge the success of a workout? Here
it is...

Take your workout records (in terms of weight and reps) from the
previous week and compare it to the current week. Did you improve?
Were you able to either increase the resistance slightly on each
exercise, or perform an extra rep or two?

If so, you had a successful workout, regardless of how much blood you
were able to pump into your muscle tissue.

Building muscle mass and strength is all about training with 100%
intensity on every given set and then striving to improve from week to
week. If you are able to consistently achieve this, your muscle size
and strength will increase faster than you ever thought possible, with
or without a pump.

I hope this article cleared up your confusion on the issue of "muscle
pumps". There's so much misleading muscle-building information
circling around on the Internet these days that it can sometimes be
impossible to know who to listen to. If you want to learn the truth
about other common, counterproductive "myths", visit my blog below...

http://tipsforbuildingmuscle.blogspot.com/


I'm with Rob here. 300 reps of 10 lbs. is a poor example. Almost anyone
wishing to get bigger will work for a pump in their muscles. While
bodybuilders may tend to do it with lighter weights than powerlifters, a
powerlifter doing sets of 3-5 reps on 1-2 minute rests will also get
bigger as he/she gets stronger. There is a continuum - heavy weights,
short sets and long rests on one side, and lighter but still substantial
(let's say greater than 50% 1RM) weights, longer sets, and shorter rests
on the other, and there is no need to come down absolutely on one end of
the spectrum or the other unless your goals dictate that approach.

The only thing 300 reps of 10 lbs. will cause you to do is eat more of
your favorite snack when your workout is over.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com



Steve,
Most top bodybuilders still move a **** load of iron. Have you seen those
videos of Ronnie Coleman doing 800 lb squats and deads not too far out from
a show? The biggest difference is that they do add more volume training and
visualization. If you continually visualize yourself getting larger muscles
and looking more like a bodybuilder, you will tend to move in that
direction. Diet plays a huge role too. If I had larger hands and could have
been a good dead lifter without straps, I could have been a very good
powerlifter. My bench and squats were really good, but I could not pull a
damn thing without straps. :-)


--
Robert Schuh
"Everything that elevates an individual above the herd and
intimidates the neighbour is henceforth called evil; and
the fair, modest, submissive and conforming mentality,
the mediocrity of desires attains moral designations and honors"
- Nietzsche

http://www.hardbopdrums.com/


  #7  
Old May 30th 07, 05:42 PM posted to misc.fitness.weights
Stephan Carydakis
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 46
Default Why Your Muscle Pumps Have Nothing To Do With Your Muscle Gains


"Hard Bop Drums" wrote in message
...
"Steve Freides" wrote in message
...
wrote in message
oups.com...


snip


-S-
http://www.kbnj.com



Steve,
Most top bodybuilders still move a **** load of iron. Have you seen those
videos of Ronnie Coleman doing 800 lb squats and deads not too far out

from
a show? The biggest difference is that they do add more volume training

and
visualization. If you continually visualize yourself getting larger

muscles
and looking more like a bodybuilder, you will tend to move in that
direction. Diet plays a huge role too. If I had larger hands and could

have
been a good dead lifter without straps, I could have been a very good
powerlifter. My bench and squats were really good, but I could not pull a
damn thing without straps. :-)


3 weeks ago I got my first lifting aids which were straps. I must say as far
as being able get more work done, they've helped. I was getting to a point
where I couldn't hold some weights for long enough to really work a muscle -
now I can...



--
Robert Schuh
"Everything that elevates an individual above the herd and
intimidates the neighbour is henceforth called evil; and
the fair, modest, submissive and conforming mentality,
the mediocrity of desires attains moral designations and honors"
- Nietzsche

http://www.hardbopdrums.com/



Steph.


 




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