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The Minigaig, and Comyn's Road



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 1st 04, 02:24 PM
Tom Reid
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Default The Minigaig, and Comyn's Road

This is my first post to the group.
I live close to the Angus Glens, and spend much of my time in the summer
walking on the tops above Glen Doll, Glen Prosen and Glen Isla. My brother,
who lives in Australia spends part of the year in Scotland and enjoys the
walking too.
He is keen to explore the routes from Blair Atholl to Ruthven Barracks at
Kingussie, but we wonder if they are beyond our navigational capabilities.
I have read Ralph Storer on "Exploring Scottish Hill Tracks", published
1991, and see that he says of both these routes (but particularly Comyn's
Road) that the tracks can be hard to follow in places, and should only be
tackled by people who are skilled navigators.
I wonder if any members of the newsgroup who have been over either of these
routes recently would mind sharing their experience with me. I am
particularly keen to know if, 13 years on from the date of this book, the
track is still as hard to follow, and also whether anyone knows of any group
who have a walk planned on either of these routes this summer.


  #2  
Old February 1st 04, 03:39 PM
Graham Ingram
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Posts: n/a
Default The Minigaig, and Comyn's Road

This is my first post to the group.
Welcome Tom, Good to have someone else posting from this part of the
world

I have walked parts of The Minigaig with no problems but have not yet
done the trhrough walk all teh way although it is on my list of walks
to do.

Try link below for good info

www.walkscotland.com/minigaig.htm

Hope this helps

Cheers

I live close to the Angus Glens, and spend much of my time in the

summer
walking on the tops above Glen Doll, Glen Prosen and Glen Isla. My

brother,
who lives in Australia spends part of the year in Scotland and

enjoys the
walking too.
He is keen to explore the routes from Blair Atholl to Ruthven

Barracks at
Kingussie, but we wonder if they are beyond our navigational

capabilities.
I have read Ralph Storer on "Exploring Scottish Hill Tracks",

published
1991, and see that he says of both these routes (but particularly

Comyn's
Road) that the tracks can be hard to follow in places, and should

only be
tackled by people who are skilled navigators.
I wonder if any members of the newsgroup who have been over either

of these
routes recently would mind sharing their experience with me. I am
particularly keen to know if, 13 years on from the date of this

book, the
track is still as hard to follow, and also whether anyone knows of

any group
who have a walk planned on either of these routes this summer.




  #3  
Old February 1st 04, 10:08 PM
druidh
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default The Minigaig, and Comyn's Road



"Tom Reid" wrote in message
...
This is my first post to the group.
I live close to the Angus Glens, and spend much of my time in the summer
walking on the tops above Glen Doll, Glen Prosen and Glen Isla. My

brother,
who lives in Australia spends part of the year in Scotland and enjoys the
walking too.
He is keen to explore the routes from Blair Atholl to Ruthven Barracks at
Kingussie, but we wonder if they are beyond our navigational capabilities.
I have read Ralph Storer on "Exploring Scottish Hill Tracks", published
1991, and see that he says of both these routes (but particularly Comyn's
Road) that the tracks can be hard to follow in places, and should only be
tackled by people who are skilled navigators.
I wonder if any members of the newsgroup who have been over either of

these
routes recently would mind sharing their experience with me. I am
particularly keen to know if, 13 years on from the date of this book, the
track is still as hard to follow, and also whether anyone knows of any

group
who have a walk planned on either of these routes this summer.

Hi Tom - welcome to u.r.w

I walked Comyns Road about 8 years back. It was a lovely route with loads of
variation. As far as navigation is concerned, you're following decent tracks
for around 3/4 of it's length. The only unmarked section are up the hill
past Cuilltemhuc down to the next land-rover track and then the climb over
Sron a Chleirich down to Allt Gharbh Ghaig. Following the line of a small
stream will get you past the first one, but you could well do with a map &
compass (or even a GPS!) for the second. As I recall, there's a b*thy in
amongst the sheilings which you pass en route. Some of the old track is
still just about visible in the heather - more by the presence of a terrace
than anything immediately obvious underfoot. For me, the joy was in trying
to find and follow these old overgrown sections.

To be honest, unless the weather has really closed in, you're most likely to
get lost at the very start, trying to decipher which route to take throug
hthe Atholl Estate policies.

I did it in late September and had to put up with the stags rutting all
night round the tent - not the best nights sleep I've ever had.


I didn't follow the old route down to Ruthven, instead sticking to the main
track down to Tromie Bridge. I'd definitely do this next time.



druidh




 




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