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Team Martin Stuns Cycling World



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 31st 04, 09:36 AM
Martin W. Smith
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Default Team Martin Stuns Cycling World

Team Martin entered the world famous Vestfold Rundt bike race
yesterday. The 165 km race begins and ends in Horten, Norway. Martin
competed on his Fisher Dual Sport 129. He finished in a time of 5:42,
for an average speed of 29 km/hour.

martin

  #2  
Old May 31st 04, 10:28 PM
Pat
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Default Team Martin Stuns Cycling World


"Martin W. Smith" wrote in message
...
Team Martin entered the world famous Vestfold Rundt bike race
yesterday. The 165 km race begins and ends in Horten, Norway. Martin
competed on his Fisher Dual Sport 129. He finished in a time of 5:42,
for an average speed of 29 km/hour.

martin


What was the weather like? Was it extremely hilly?

pat in TX



  #3  
Old June 1st 04, 07:55 AM
Martin W. Smith
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Default Team Martin Stuns Cycling World

"Pat" wrote:


"Martin W. Smith" wrote in message
.. .
Team Martin entered the world famous Vestfold Rundt bike race
yesterday. The 165 km race begins and ends in Horten, Norway. Martin
competed on his Fisher Dual Sport 129. He finished in a time of 5:42,
for an average speed of 29 km/hour.

martin


What was the weather like? Was it extremely hilly?


The weather was perfect, except for a head wind in the second half. I
would say it was average hilly, not extremely hilly. There were lots
of long, rather gradual hills, which didn't bother me. I do better in
the higher gears pedaling slower. I noticed that the other people were
pedaling faster than me most of the time. The killer hills for me were
the short steep ones in the second half, where I had to gear way down.
I'm no good at standing while pedaling.

I stayed with the main pack all the way until we reached all those
short steep hills about 2/3 of the way through the race. Then I
dropped back. I felt a physical change at about 3 hours, which was a
little before I dropped behind the pack. It was sort of that
hypoglycemic, stunned feeling, so I had to go into survival mode. I
wore a CamelBack water pack, so I drank enough water, I think, but I
didn't eat anything along the way, and that probably hurt me. So I
stopped at the last food station and ate some bananas.

At about 80 km, I fell behind the pack about 200 meters, and I thought
I was dying then, but I discovered I was breathing too shallow. I
started breathing deeply, and after another 5 km I cought the pack
again and stayed with them for another half hour until I dropped back
for good.

My legs were strong the whole way, and my breathing was good, when I
remembered to do it. It's not like swimming where you can only breath
at a certain point in your stroke, so you focus on breathing. In
riding, you can match your pace to your breathing, so it is easy to
slow your breathing down and slow your pace down at the same time
without knowing it, if you are riding on your own.

I should have put slicks on my bike, I guess. I don't know how much
difference that makes. My tires aren't real knobby, but they could be
a lot smoother.

I think my blood chemistry went south at the three hour mark. If I
could have kept it normal, I think I might have gone about five hours.
But 5:42 is a lot better than my previous time of 7:06, so it was a
good ride.

martin

  #4  
Old June 1st 04, 08:10 AM
Jason O'Rourke
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Default Team Martin Stuns Cycling World

Martin W. Smith wrote:
little before I dropped behind the pack. It was sort of that
hypoglycemic, stunned feeling, so I had to go into survival mode. I
wore a CamelBack water pack, so I drank enough water, I think, but I
didn't eat anything along the way, and that probably hurt me. So I
stopped at the last food station and ate some bananas.


100 miles is in the ballpark of 4000 calories. Yeah, not eating was
not a good plan. Defintely the weekend warrior method...I've pulled
more than a few of them.
--
Jason O'Rourke www.jor.com
  #5  
Old June 1st 04, 11:41 AM
Larry Weisenthal
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Default Team Martin Stuns Cycling World

Nice job. Both the ride and the account of same. I dare say that many of us
feel that we've gotten to know you pretty well, and it was fun to read of your
impressive exploit.


  #6  
Old June 1st 04, 03:51 PM
Al
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Default Team Martin Stuns Cycling World

In article ,
says...
"Pat" wrote:


"Martin W. Smith" wrote in message
.. .
Team Martin entered the world famous Vestfold Rundt bike race
yesterday. The 165 km race begins and ends in Horten, Norway. Martin
competed on his Fisher Dual Sport 129. He finished in a time of 5:42,
for an average speed of 29 km/hour.

martin


What was the weather like? Was it extremely hilly?


The weather was perfect, except for a head wind in the second half. I
would say it was average hilly, not extremely hilly. There were lots
of long, rather gradual hills, which didn't bother me. I do better in
the higher gears pedaling slower. I noticed that the other people were
pedaling faster than me most of the time. The killer hills for me were
the short steep ones in the second half, where I had to gear way down.
I'm no good at standing while pedaling.

I stayed with the main pack all the way until we reached all those
short steep hills about 2/3 of the way through the race. Then I
dropped back. I felt a physical change at about 3 hours, which was a
little before I dropped behind the pack. It was sort of that
hypoglycemic, stunned feeling, so I had to go into survival mode. I
wore a CamelBack water pack, so I drank enough water, I think, but I
didn't eat anything along the way, and that probably hurt me. So I
stopped at the last food station and ate some bananas.

At about 80 km, I fell behind the pack about 200 meters, and I thought
I was dying then, but I discovered I was breathing too shallow. I
started breathing deeply, and after another 5 km I cought the pack
again and stayed with them for another half hour until I dropped back
for good.

My legs were strong the whole way, and my breathing was good, when I
remembered to do it. It's not like swimming where you can only breath
at a certain point in your stroke, so you focus on breathing. In
riding, you can match your pace to your breathing, so it is easy to
slow your breathing down and slow your pace down at the same time
without knowing it, if you are riding on your own.

I should have put slicks on my bike, I guess. I don't know how much
difference that makes. My tires aren't real knobby, but they could be
a lot smoother.

I think my blood chemistry went south at the three hour mark. If I
could have kept it normal, I think I might have gone about five hours.
But 5:42 is a lot better than my previous time of 7:06, so it was a
good ride.

martin


And where were the Team Martin domestiques all this time? :-) Great
job, thanks for posting the outcome.

- Al
  #7  
Old June 1st 04, 11:09 PM
Olivier
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Default Team Martin Stuns Cycling World


"Martin W. Smith" a écrit dans le message de news:
The killer hills for me were
the short steep ones in the second half, where I had to gear way down.
I'm no good at standing while pedaling.


I had exactly the same problem during my latest 75 km bike race. I couldn't
follow the pack when going uphill, and had to catch them back after each
hill on flat land. Enough power, but too much weight. Too bad the arrival
what at the peak of a hill!

I believe this is due to my swimmer 's body: too much weight in the upper
body. I'm 76kg / 179cm, when typical bikers are around 67 kg for the same
heigth.

Maybe some triathlete here know how to sove this? How to lose weight -
without losing swimming power - in the upper body?

-- Olivier


  #8  
Old June 2nd 04, 08:00 AM
Martin W. Smith
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Posts: n/a
Default Team Martin Stuns Cycling World

"Olivier" wrote:


"Martin W. Smith" a écrit dans le message de news:
The killer hills for me were
the short steep ones in the second half, where I had to gear way down.
I'm no good at standing while pedaling.


I had exactly the same problem during my latest 75 km bike race. I couldn't
follow the pack when going uphill, and had to catch them back after each
hill on flat land. Enough power, but too much weight. Too bad the arrival
what at the peak of a hill!

I believe this is due to my swimmer 's body: too much weight in the upper
body. I'm 76kg / 179cm, when typical bikers are around 67 kg for the same
heigth.

Maybe some triathlete here know how to sove this? How to lose weight -
without losing swimming power - in the upper body?


I don't think this problem is due to weight. There were plenty of men
and women in the same pack who were about my size or bigger. I'm not
all that big. 90 kilos is about 5 kilos heavier than I want to be, but
I'm not overweight. Perhaps I am bigger than the average elite bike
racer, but I was probably average for that race.

I attribute the problem to three causes:

1. I'm not a bike racer. I'm not much of a swimmer either, but I have
trained forty years as a swimmer, not a bike rider. I've done a lot of
spinners classes over the last year, which I'm sure partially accounts
for my big improvement, but doing six one-hour spinners classes per
week is nothing like doing a 100 mile race.

2. I didn't eat during the race until about the 120 km mark. I drank
plenty of water, but I'm pretty sure low blood sugar began to degrade
my performance at about the three hour mark.

3. I was riding a mountain bike with off-road tires. It is a very good
bike, with 29 inch wheels, and I am sure the bike also was responsible
for part of my improvement, but everyone else in the pack I was in
(except for one guy) was riding a fairly expensive road bike.

By the way, that other guy in my pack on a mountain bike was riding a
standard mountain bike, ie with the smaller wheels, and he weighed at
least 100 kilos. He was still with the pack when I dropped back.

martin

 




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