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Which Wainwright guide?



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 3rd 11, 05:05 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
Gordon[_5_]
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Posts: 114
Default Which Wainwright guide?

Hi, I'm going to Seatoller for a couple of days soon, which Wainwright's
Guide covers that area?

Ta!
  #2  
Old March 3rd 11, 06:36 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
Tim Jackson[_2_]
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Posts: 127
Default Which Wainwright guide?

On Thu, 03 Mar 2011 16:05:46 +0000, Gordon wrote...

Hi, I'm going to Seatoller for a couple of days soon, which Wainwright's
Guide covers that area?


Seatoller is conveniently situated on the corner between Book 4
(Southern Fells), Book 6 (North Western Fells) and Book 7 (Western
Fells)!

E.g. Scafell Pike, Glaramara and Seathwaite Fell are in Book 4. Great
Gable, Base Brown and Green Gable are in Book 7. Dale Head and High Spy
are in Book 6.

There are also a few lumps and bumps to the east of Borrowdale and
Langstrath which are accessible from Seatoller, and which are found in
Book 3 (Central Fells).

--
Tim Jackson
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  #3  
Old March 3rd 11, 07:02 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
Gordon[_5_]
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Posts: 114
Default Which Wainwright guide?

On 03/03/11 17:36, Tim Jackson wrote:
On Thu, 03 Mar 2011 16:05:46 +0000, Gordon wrote...

Hi, I'm going to Seatoller for a couple of days soon, which Wainwright's
Guide covers that area?


Seatoller is conveniently situated on the corner between Book 4
(Southern Fells), Book 6 (North Western Fells) and Book 7 (Western
Fells)!

E.g. Scafell Pike, Glaramara and Seathwaite Fell are in Book 4. Great
Gable, Base Brown and Green Gable are in Book 7. Dale Head and High Spy
are in Book 6.

There are also a few lumps and bumps to the east of Borrowdale and
Langstrath which are accessible from Seatoller, and which are found in
Book 3 (Central Fells).


So I'd better buy the whole set just to be on the safe side? Typical. :-)
  #4  
Old March 3rd 11, 08:40 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
Simon Challands
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Posts: 507
Default Which Wainwright guide?

In message
Gordon wrote:

Hi, I'm going to Seatoller for a couple of days soon, which Wainwright's
Guide covers that area?


Central, Southern, Western, and North Western - you're pretty much on
the boundary of all of those.

--
Simon Challands
  #5  
Old March 4th 11, 12:41 AM posted to uk.rec.walking
Phil Cook[_2_]
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Posts: 826
Default Which Wainwright guide?

On Thu, 03 Mar 2011 18:02:53 +0000, Gordon wrote:

On 03/03/11 17:36, Tim Jackson wrote:
On Thu, 03 Mar 2011 16:05:46 +0000, Gordon wrote...

Hi, I'm going to Seatoller for a couple of days soon, which Wainwright's
Guide covers that area?


So I'd better buy the whole set just to be on the safe side? Typical. :-)


It's worse than that. You might have to buy two sets. The original and or
the revised depending on whether you accept "scribbling in the margin is
worth it for revisions making the guide useful again" or "art for art's
sake, Wainwright is sacrosanct but hopelessly out of date" or fall between
the two stools.

Me I've got a set of six new and one original. The original (in reprint of
course) is a kind of extra-fell memory for me. My Dad bought it for me as a
Christmas present before he passed away, so the white spine of it's dust
jacket amongst my set reminds me of him every day.
--
Phil Cook, last hill: Meall Glas (Breadalbane)
http://www.therewaslight.co.uk/20110...visibility.jpg
83 0f 283 to go...
Hey! That's 200 up!
  #6  
Old March 4th 11, 12:42 AM posted to uk.rec.walking
MP[_3_]
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Posts: 22
Default Which Wainwright guide?

On 03/03/2011 22:43, Martin Richardson wrote:
On Mar 3, 4:05 pm, Gordon wrote:
Hi, I'm going to Seatoller for a couple of days soon, which

Wainwright's
Guide covers that area?

Ta!

You don't need a Wainwright guide to find one of his routes - just
follow the well worn groove. Bill Birkett's Complete Lakeland Fells
will get you to more hills than you would ever need.

I have quite a number of assorted books on Lakeland walking, among some
of the best IMHO and to just to mention a few are of cause the full set
of Wainwright's Guides, a few from Bob Allen, and by no means least a
great little rucksack sized book by Bill Birkett covering routes for all
the fell tops over 1000ft called The Lakeland Fells Almanac an excellent
book to be use in conjunction with OS maps.
Happy walking
MP

  #7  
Old March 4th 11, 11:34 AM posted to uk.rec.walking
Walter Janné
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Posts: 16
Default Which Wainwright guide?

Martin Richardson schrieb:

On Mar 3, 4:05*pm, Gordon wrote:
Hi, I'm going to Seatoller for a couple of days soon, which Wainwright's
Guide covers that area?

Ta!


You don't need a Wainwright guide to find one of his routes - just
follow the well worn groove. Bill Birkett's Complete Lakeland Fells
will get you to more hills than you would ever need.


You won't need any Wainwright at all to find your way in the Lakeland
fells. A good map will always do. )

But it is essential to have them all because every bookshelf is
blessed to have these masterpieces on it.

Walter
  #8  
Old March 4th 11, 12:43 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
Mike Clark[_3_]
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Posts: 157
Default Which Wainwright guide?

In message
Martin Richardson wrote:

On Mar 3, 4:05*pm, Gordon wrote:
Hi, I'm going to Seatoller for a couple of days soon, which
Wainwright's Guide covers that area?

Ta!


You don't need a Wainwright guide to find one of his routes - just
follow the well worn groove. Bill Birkett's Complete Lakeland Fells
will get you to more hills than you would ever need.


I've never owned or used a Wainwright guide and simply prefer to buy the
OS maps and plan my own routes from them.

Mike
--
o/ \\ // |\ ,_ o Mike Clark
\__,\\ // __o | \ / /\, "A mountain climbing, cycling, skiing,
" || _`\,_ |__\ \ | caving, antibody engineer and
` || (_)/ (_) | \corn computer user" http://www.antibody.me.uk/
  #9  
Old March 4th 11, 02:53 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
MP[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 22
Default Which Wainwright guide?

On 04/03/2011 11:43, Mike Clark wrote:
I've never owned or used a Wainwright guide and simply prefer to buy the
OS maps and plan my own routes from them.

Mike


Wainwright guides aren’t really just about getting you to the top of a
fell, there are many books on the lakes that do that, they are more to
do with his eloquent way of describing a walk and his delightful turn of
phrase combine this with his superb had drawn pictures the books are to
be read by the fireside as well as on the fells.
As I say if its good no nonce’s pocket sized guide to all the fells to
use with your OS maps then Bill Birkett’s The Lakeland Fells Almanac is
very handy.
I love OS maps,
MP

  #10  
Old March 4th 11, 03:09 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
Mike Clark[_3_]
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Posts: 157
Default Which Wainwright guide?

In message
MP wrote:

On 04/03/2011 11:43, Mike Clark wrote:
I've never owned or used a Wainwright guide and simply prefer to buy the
OS maps and plan my own routes from them.

Mike


Wainwright guides aren’t really just about getting you to the top of a
fell, there are many books on the lakes that do that, they are more to
do with his eloquent way of describing a walk and his delightful turn
of phrase combine this with his superb had drawn pictures the books
are to be read by the fireside as well as on the fells. As I say if
its good no nonce’s pocket sized guide to all the fells to use with
your OS maps then Bill Birkett’s The Lakeland Fells Almanac is very
handy. I love OS maps, MP


I don't find Wainwright's turn of phrase in any way delightful and I
certainly wouldn't wish to trawl my way through his guides by the
fireside. In his writings he comes across to me as someone with a severe
personality disorder and an autistic pendantry that could just as easily
be directed towards an activity such as trainspotting. Indeed he has
such a wimpish attitude to outdoor risks, avoiding some magnificant
lake district scrambles and being afraid to venture up onto the Scottish
hills for example, that he probably would have been better off as a
trainspotter. I know many find his writings interesting, but I find them
tedious and dull.

Mike
--
o/ \\ // |\ ,_ o Mike Clark
\__,\\ // __o | \ / /\, "A mountain climbing, cycling, skiing,
" || _`\,_ |__\ \ | caving, antibody engineer and
` || (_)/ (_) | \corn computer user" http://www.antibody.me.uk/
 




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