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Has anyone tried "Nordic Walking"



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 22nd 03, 12:15 AM
Isiafs5
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Posts: n/a
Default Has anyone tried "Nordic Walking"


Nordic Walking requires 2 poles (like skis) and looks similar to
cross-country skiing but it's on regular ground.

I have read that it can increase cardiovascular workouts by 10-20% and
add upper body strength.


It would be interesting to see if this is actually true. Given a HRM and two
sticks one could do a real world test.

Frankly, it just sounds like a marketing gimmick to sell refurbished ski poles.


Sling Skate

My recommended reading for body fat control:
http://www.geocities.com/~slopitch/drsquat/fredzig.htm










  #3  
Old September 22nd 03, 05:34 PM
Isiafs5
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Default Has anyone tried "Nordic Walking"


It´s something that most skiers do in the pre-season.


I assume that you mean xc skiing. That would make sense, especially up and
down hills.

For Alpine skiing, I can think of plenty of much better ways to pre-season
train.

Sling Skate

My recommended reading for body fat control:
http://www.geocities.com/~slopitch/drsquat/fredzig.htm










  #5  
Old September 23rd 03, 09:56 PM
Isiafs5
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Posts: n/a
Default Has anyone tried "Nordic Walking"


It wouldn´t be that bad for Alpine skiiing but not top priority I
guess, they need good aerobic capacity and it can´t hurt to get some
"stamina" (Bad word but I can´t find a better one just now.) in the
upper body as well as in the legs.


I found that ice skating was a very good preseason training for Alpine. Also,
using modified poles with inlines for skating uphills and then slamon down was
the best conditioning, in my opinion.

Sling Skate

My recommended reading for body fat control:
http://www.geocities.com/~slopitch/drsquat/fredzig.htm










  #6  
Old September 24th 03, 06:20 AM
SPeacock
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Posts: n/a
Default Has anyone tried "Nordic Walking"



wrote:

Nordic Walking requires 2 poles (like skis) and looks similar to
cross-country skiing but it's on regular ground.

I have read that it can increase cardiovascular workouts by 10-20% and
add upper body strength.

Was wondering if anyone has any experience with this. Any comments will
be appreciated.

Sy


Nordic Walking is a method or 'style' of walking that is popular in the
Scandinavia as well in many other countries. It has been honed to an
extreme competition.

A typical use of the 'Nordic' style are for hikers and backpackers in the
US. The US is a relative late comer to using trek poles. They have been
in use in Europe for years.

Generally they (you need two) are used to offload some of the weight from
the legs and involve the upper body to share the load. Typically 20 pounds
are put on the trek poles through the arms. That's about 40,000 pounds a
mile! This effectively shifts the effort to the smaller upper body
muscles. It results in a more total body involvement or workout. It also
requires some slow but steady practice to effectively use the poles.

Actually I use the poles to reduce my heart rate. I get more miles in a
long day of hiking in steep terrain for the same perceived amount of
effort. You can, while on an incline, if you increase your speed, raise
your heart rate to almost any level using the poles. Consider it 4 wheel
drive in rough terrain or if used in the Nordic style in a competition
mode, you will be one fit walker in due time.

The following are a few links to more information about what a trek pole is
and how it is used. It IS different in use and function than are regular
ol' hiking poles or sticks.

http://www.backpacking.net/trekpole.html
http://www.backpacking.net/walkstik.html

and the hands down overall best ref:

http://www.personal.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/poles.htm

I used the following criteria: cost, weight, size collapsed -- choosing the
least of each. Mine are Komperdells (REI.com, SierraTradingPost.com,
Ebay.com), with cork handles, no cant to the grips, NOT sprung (defeats the
purpose), three section. Mine were around $50 the pair and have served me
well. For more extreme conditions the Black Diamond method for holding the
sections in place is preferred by some.


  #7  
Old September 24th 03, 12:42 PM
Jarko Mattila
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Has anyone tried "Nordic Walking"

It's funny to read this group =)

I live in Finland and this 'nordic' walking is very common
excercise here.

In Finland it's called 'sauvakävely'.

Just get your sticks get out!

With normal walking speed you can increase your heartbeat for 15-20%

jarko dot mattila at nokia dot com
"SPeacock" wrote in message
...


wrote:

Nordic Walking requires 2 poles (like skis) and looks similar to
cross-country skiing but it's on regular ground.

I have read that it can increase cardiovascular workouts by 10-20% and
add upper body strength.

Was wondering if anyone has any experience with this. Any comments will
be appreciated.

Sy


Nordic Walking is a method or 'style' of walking that is popular in the
Scandinavia as well in many other countries. It has been honed to an
extreme competition.

A typical use of the 'Nordic' style are for hikers and backpackers in the
US. The US is a relative late comer to using trek poles. They have been
in use in Europe for years.

Generally they (you need two) are used to offload some of the weight from
the legs and involve the upper body to share the load. Typically 20

pounds
are put on the trek poles through the arms. That's about 40,000 pounds a
mile! This effectively shifts the effort to the smaller upper body
muscles. It results in a more total body involvement or workout. It also
requires some slow but steady practice to effectively use the poles.

Actually I use the poles to reduce my heart rate. I get more miles in a
long day of hiking in steep terrain for the same perceived amount of
effort. You can, while on an incline, if you increase your speed, raise
your heart rate to almost any level using the poles. Consider it 4 wheel
drive in rough terrain or if used in the Nordic style in a competition
mode, you will be one fit walker in due time.

The following are a few links to more information about what a trek pole

is
and how it is used. It IS different in use and function than are regular
ol' hiking poles or sticks.

http://www.backpacking.net/trekpole.html
http://www.backpacking.net/walkstik.html

and the hands down overall best ref:

http://www.personal.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/poles.htm

I used the following criteria: cost, weight, size collapsed -- choosing

the
least of each. Mine are Komperdells (REI.com, SierraTradingPost.com,
Ebay.com), with cork handles, no cant to the grips, NOT sprung (defeats

the
purpose), three section. Mine were around $50 the pair and have served me
well. For more extreme conditions the Black Diamond method for holding

the
sections in place is preferred by some.




  #8  
Old September 24th 03, 09:31 PM
Walker
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Has anyone tried "Nordic Walking"

Are there in Finland also funny people who ask "where is the snow" "where
are yous skis?"

I have followed a masterclass in june from Marko Kantaneva, Headmaster
Nordicwalking of the Inwa.
What kind of poles you walking with?
Do you have in Finland Nordicwalking clubs?
Whe walk here with the Exel poles Trainer,Active and Sport.

Regards Walker

"Jarko Mattila" schreef in bericht
...
It's funny to read this group =)

I live in Finland and this 'nordic' walking is very common
excercise here.

In Finland it's called 'sauvakävely'.

Just get your sticks get out!

With normal walking speed you can increase your heartbeat for 15-20%

jarko dot mattila at nokia dot com
"SPeacock" wrote in message
...


wrote:

Nordic Walking requires 2 poles (like skis) and looks similar to
cross-country skiing but it's on regular ground.

I have read that it can increase cardiovascular workouts by 10-20% and
add upper body strength.

Was wondering if anyone has any experience with this. Any comments

will
be appreciated.

Sy


Nordic Walking is a method or 'style' of walking that is popular in the
Scandinavia as well in many other countries. It has been honed to an
extreme competition.

A typical use of the 'Nordic' style are for hikers and backpackers in

the
US. The US is a relative late comer to using trek poles. They have

been
in use in Europe for years.

Generally they (you need two) are used to offload some of the weight

from
the legs and involve the upper body to share the load. Typically 20

pounds
are put on the trek poles through the arms. That's about 40,000 pounds

a
mile! This effectively shifts the effort to the smaller upper body
muscles. It results in a more total body involvement or workout. It

also
requires some slow but steady practice to effectively use the poles.

Actually I use the poles to reduce my heart rate. I get more miles in a
long day of hiking in steep terrain for the same perceived amount of
effort. You can, while on an incline, if you increase your speed, raise
your heart rate to almost any level using the poles. Consider it 4

wheel
drive in rough terrain or if used in the Nordic style in a competition
mode, you will be one fit walker in due time.

The following are a few links to more information about what a trek pole

is
and how it is used. It IS different in use and function than are

regular
ol' hiking poles or sticks.

http://www.backpacking.net/trekpole.html
http://www.backpacking.net/walkstik.html

and the hands down overall best ref:

http://www.personal.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/poles.htm

I used the following criteria: cost, weight, size collapsed -- choosing

the
least of each. Mine are Komperdells (REI.com, SierraTradingPost.com,
Ebay.com), with cork handles, no cant to the grips, NOT sprung (defeats

the
purpose), three section. Mine were around $50 the pair and have served

me
well. For more extreme conditions the Black Diamond method for holding

the
sections in place is preferred by some.






  #9  
Old September 25th 03, 02:52 AM
nnaoj5
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Has anyone tried "Nordic Walking"

I have a Nordic Track. You slide along the tracks & move poles connected to
pistons with your arms. I get a very good workout with it.

Jo Ann


"Walker" wrote in message
...
Are there in Finland also funny people who ask "where is the snow" "where
are yous skis?"

I have followed a masterclass in june from Marko Kantaneva, Headmaster
Nordicwalking of the Inwa.
What kind of poles you walking with?
Do you have in Finland Nordicwalking clubs?
Whe walk here with the Exel poles Trainer,Active and Sport.

Regards Walker

"Jarko Mattila" schreef in bericht
...
It's funny to read this group =)

I live in Finland and this 'nordic' walking is very common
excercise here.

In Finland it's called 'sauvakävely'.

Just get your sticks get out!

With normal walking speed you can increase your heartbeat for 15-20%

jarko dot mattila at nokia dot com
"SPeacock" wrote in message
...


wrote:

Nordic Walking requires 2 poles (like skis) and looks similar to
cross-country skiing but it's on regular ground.

I have read that it can increase cardiovascular workouts by 10-20%

and
add upper body strength.

Was wondering if anyone has any experience with this. Any comments

will
be appreciated.

Sy


Nordic Walking is a method or 'style' of walking that is popular in

the
Scandinavia as well in many other countries. It has been honed to an
extreme competition.

A typical use of the 'Nordic' style are for hikers and backpackers in

the
US. The US is a relative late comer to using trek poles. They have

been
in use in Europe for years.

Generally they (you need two) are used to offload some of the weight

from
the legs and involve the upper body to share the load. Typically 20

pounds
are put on the trek poles through the arms. That's about 40,000

pounds
a
mile! This effectively shifts the effort to the smaller upper body
muscles. It results in a more total body involvement or workout. It

also
requires some slow but steady practice to effectively use the poles.

Actually I use the poles to reduce my heart rate. I get more miles in

a
long day of hiking in steep terrain for the same perceived amount of
effort. You can, while on an incline, if you increase your speed,

raise
your heart rate to almost any level using the poles. Consider it 4

wheel
drive in rough terrain or if used in the Nordic style in a competition
mode, you will be one fit walker in due time.

The following are a few links to more information about what a trek

pole
is
and how it is used. It IS different in use and function than are

regular
ol' hiking poles or sticks.

http://www.backpacking.net/trekpole.html
http://www.backpacking.net/walkstik.html

and the hands down overall best ref:

http://www.personal.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/poles.htm

I used the following criteria: cost, weight, size collapsed --

choosing
the
least of each. Mine are Komperdells (REI.com, SierraTradingPost.com,
Ebay.com), with cork handles, no cant to the grips, NOT sprung

(defeats
the
purpose), three section. Mine were around $50 the pair and have served

me
well. For more extreme conditions the Black Diamond method for

holding
the
sections in place is preferred by some.








  #10  
Old September 25th 03, 07:42 AM
SPeacock
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Has anyone tried "Nordic Walking"



Walker wrote:

Are there in Finland also funny people who ask "where is the snow" "where
are yous skis?"


I just tell them I am stalking ants.

There is an emergency since the great invasion of 2001, and hadn't they heard of
it. Would they like to volunteer to help?

Have met some people on trails that are very much AGAINST the use of poles while
hiking. Some trails are a bit defaced by the points of the poles. Two tracks
of thousands of little holes on the sides of the trail running out of sight up
the track where hundreds of previous hikers have been

 




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