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Right specialist for meniscus tear (was given a referral to a neurologistinstead of ortho)?



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 4th 04, 02:10 PM
Benjamin Walling
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Default Right specialist for meniscus tear (was given a referral to a neurologistinstead of ortho)?

I was found to have a meniscus tear in my right knee along with a
Baker's cyst. He recommended that I see an orthopedist and have
surgery. I'm on an HMO, so I have to get a referral. When his office
called back with the referral, they gave me the name of a doctor who is
a Neurologist (not an MD, but a DO). I'm confused - what can a
neurologist have to do with this?

I have several friend who are physical therapists. They are also
confused by this choice of a neurologist, and have recommendations on
surgeons that they know professionally.

Should I just have my office change the referral to one of the names I
was given, or is there something the Neurologist can do that is worth my
while?
  #2  
Old December 4th 04, 10:32 PM
Dan Stumpus
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Benjamin Walling wrote:

I was found to have a meniscus tear in my right knee along with a
Baker's cyst. He recommended that I see an orthopedist and have
surgery. I'm on an HMO, so I have to get a referral. When his office
called back with the referral, they gave me the name of a doctor who
is a Neurologist (not an MD, but a DO). I'm confused - what can a
neurologist have to do with this?


I think he may be an Osteopath. They get the similar rigorous training, and
pass the same tests as MD's, but it's a different training tradition. It's
more holistic and emphasizes structural balance in the body, with an
emphasis on skeletal/muscular/neurological functioning. They are fully
licensed to do anything an MD can, I recall.

Here's a link: http://www.innerself.com/Health/disc...osteopathy.htm






  #3  
Old December 5th 04, 12:35 AM
bj
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Why did they give you a referral to a Neurologist (deals with nerves) when
an Orthopedist (bones, joints, ligaments, etc.) was recommended?
Did they confuse "osteopath" with "orthopedist"? Or maybe some staffer just
read the wrong name from a list in small print. You might want to check on
this.
bj

"Dan Stumpus" wrote in message
nk.net...
Benjamin Walling wrote:

I was found to have a meniscus tear in my right knee along with a
Baker's cyst. He recommended that I see an orthopedist and have
surgery. I'm on an HMO, so I have to get a referral. When his office
called back with the referral, they gave me the name of a doctor who
is a Neurologist (not an MD, but a DO). I'm confused - what can a
neurologist have to do with this?


I think he may be an Osteopath. They get the similar rigorous training,
and
pass the same tests as MD's, but it's a different training tradition.
It's
more holistic and emphasizes structural balance in the body, with an
emphasis on skeletal/muscular/neurological functioning. They are fully
licensed to do anything an MD can, I recall.

Here's a link: http://www.innerself.com/Health/disc...osteopathy.htm




  #4  
Old December 5th 04, 02:57 AM
Jtiche
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You need to see a meniscusologist.
  #5  
Old December 5th 04, 04:18 AM
FabulustRunner
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I think he may be an Osteopath. They get the similar rigorous training,
and
pass the same tests as MD's, but it's a different training tradition.
It's
more holistic and emphasizes structural balance in the body, with an
emphasis on skeletal/muscular/neurological functioning. They are fully
licensed to do anything an MD can, I recall.


Most insurance companys won't cover osteopaths. In any event GO IMMEDIATELY
before they discover their mistake (sending you to Dr that can actually help
you) and send you to an orthopedist. Osteopaths are the best thing that ever
happened to medicine.
  #6  
Old December 5th 04, 02:19 PM
Benjamin Walling
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FabulustRunner wrote:

Most insurance companys won't cover osteopaths. In any event GO IMMEDIATELY
before they discover their mistake (sending you to Dr that can actually help
you) and send you to an orthopedist. Osteopaths are the best thing that ever
happened to medicine.


Well, there are a number of DOs in my insurance plan.

I guess I'm curious - if I have a torn meniscus, what is there to do
other than fix it with surgery? My GP seems to think it will not heal
on its own, and I need further treatment. Aside from that, why choose a
neurologist? Seems unrelated.

I have spoken with a couple of friends who are physical therapists, and
none of them understand the choice of doctor. Neither does my brother,
who is a fourth year med student (although, he is still in school and
has not had a rotation in orthopedics or neurology).

If you think there is something to what this doctor, I'm curious to hear
it, because I'm beginning to think it was simply a mix up by the office
staff.
  #7  
Old December 5th 04, 04:08 PM
FabulustRunner
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If you think there is something to what this doctor, I'm curious to hear
it, because I'm beginning to think it was simply a mix up by the office
staff.


Well if all those people think it's a mistake, it probably is.
  #8  
Old December 5th 04, 09:27 PM
Dan Stumpus
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Benjamin Walling wrote:

I guess I'm curious - if I have a torn meniscus, what is there to do
other than fix it with surgery? My GP seems to think it will not heal
on its own, and I need further treatment. Aside from that, why
choose a neurologist? Seems unrelated.


I was once diagnosed with a small tear, and I gradually resumed running
(over several months), changed to softer shoes, and ran mostly on dirt.
After a year or two it was no longer a problem. Rule #1, if it hurts at
all, stop and walk.

I now run over 3k miles/year, and do many ultras, do speedwork twice a week
when prepping for a race, and have no problems or pain, and recent x-rays
show no joint wear.



  #9  
Old December 6th 04, 12:40 AM
FabulustRunner
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I was once diagnosed with a small tear,

Cry baby.
  #10  
Old December 6th 04, 06:10 AM
Dan Stumpus
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FabulustRunner wrote:
I was once diagnosed with a small tear,


Cry baby.


Guilty as charged. Those little suckas hurt!


 




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