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HRM, Stopwatch, Distance, Feel



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 1st 09, 05:02 AM posted to rec.running
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Posts: 11
Default HRM, Stopwatch, Distance, Feel

On Wed, 25 Feb 2009 14:45:16 -0800 (PST), Pete
wrote:

Considering I have only been running for a short amount of time, and
even then just as a 'get moving' type of thing. I'm wanting to know
what is REALLY the most important thing to be noting!! I have read a
lot of articles about heart rate, pace, distance, not to mention
speedwork, longer runs, and recovery ... all of which sounds
fantastic, except that I can only imagine it really being useful for
me if I'm wanting to make it some kind of life achievement thing.
Currently, that is not the aim.

I have entered one race so far, and I will enter more as they give me
something to aim for. But as a "casual" runner, shall we say, I'd like
to know the best type of data I should be looking at and recording.

Is heart rate important if I'm just running for 5, 10 or 20k?
Should I be getting spilt/lap time as a good indication of my
improvements?
When it all boils down, is Pace the mark I'm looking for?


FWIW....

I have been training with a heart rate monitor for 4 or 5 years now.
The greatest value lies in getting you to slow down on low intensity
days and to speed up on high intensity days. As a general rule, we
tend to run the former too hard and the latter too easy. Determining
the "ceiling" heart rate for your easy days and the "floor" heart rate
for the hard days is the trick.

As your fitness increases, your speed over a given distance will
improve on the low intensity days, and make it more difficult to
achieve the higher heart rate on your hard days, which has the effect
of increasing your speed over a given distance (as you try to get your
heart rate up).

Running by heart rate, rather than by perceived exertion, has the
benefit of taking into account variables such as heat, whether you're
tired or sick, over trained, etc. Pace becomes beside the point;
you'll naturally increase your speed as you obtain fitness.

Don't get me wrong-- I am always trying to cover whatever the distance
is as fast as possible. That's as true of my easy days as the hard,
but (on the easy days) the heart rate is a governor.

Obviously, the monitor is not of much value on race day, if you're
running 5 or 10k. I have found it extremely useful in pacing in the
marathon, however. Running low intensity (70% of max) for the first 18
to 20 miles has allowed me to have something left for the last 6 to 8.
Any help you wise and experienced people can give me will be very

VERY
much appreciated


The secret is to find out what works for you. I have benefited from a
very disciplined training regimen which is very dependent on the heart
rate monitor. Perhaps it's nothing more than another something to pass
the miles with, but it works for me.

Richard
  #3  
Old March 1st 09, 08:10 PM posted to rec.running
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Posts: 11
Default HRM, Stopwatch, Distance, Feel

On Sun, 01 Mar 2009 17:59:33 GMT, dizzy wrote:

wrote:

I have been training with a heart rate monitor for 4 or 5 years now.
The greatest value lies in getting you to slow down on low intensity
days and to speed up on high intensity days. As a general rule, we
tend to run the former too hard and the latter too easy.


Can't you tell by how hard you're breathing? I think I can...


Of course. Low intensity training can be characterized as the "talk
test". If you can talk comfortably while running, you're probably no
outside that zone. Training in the higher zone (85% of max), however,
may be harder to ascertain by your breathing. I'm usually breathing
pretty hard well before I get there.

It's just a tool, like a watch or gps unit. We don't really need any
of them, but they're available to us, and some find benefit in them.
The heart rate monitor, if nothing else, lets you see exactly what
your heart is doing, whether you do anything with that information or
not.

Richard
 




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