A Fitness & exercise forum. FitnessBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » FitnessBanter.com forum » Fitness & Exercise » Running
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

HRM, Stopwatch, Distance, Feel



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old March 2nd 09, 05:15 AM posted to rec.running
Dot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,791
Default HRM, Stopwatch, Distance, Feel

Pete wrote:

Considering I have only been running for a short amount of time, and
even then just as a 'get moving' type of thing. I'm wanting to know
what is REALLY the most important thing to be noting!! I have read a
lot of articles about heart rate, pace, distance, not to mention
speedwork, longer runs, and recovery ... all of which sounds
fantastic, except that I can only imagine it really being useful for
me if I'm wanting to make it some kind of life achievement thing.
Currently, that is not the aim.

I have entered one race so far, and I will enter more as they give me
something to aim for. But as a "casual" runner, shall we say, I'd like
to know the best type of data I should be looking at and recording.


I'm a casual, recreational runner, but I like to play for a long time.
(For me, the best type of data may be how picturesque the route was =
how many pictures.) Some reasonably intelligent training helps one run
more and faster and longer.

Just because one is a recreational runner doesn't mean some of the
training knowledge accumulated over the decades is useless. In fact, it
can help you have a more fun time.


Is heart rate important if I'm just running for 5, 10 or 20k?
Should I be getting spilt/lap time as a good indication of my
improvements?
When it all boils down, is Pace the mark I'm looking for?


Hmmm, are you a "casual" runner or a numbers geek? None of the above
info is necessary. You can just go run listening to your breathing. If
you can talk, you're ok. If you're gasping you're most likely running
too hard. I have some routes that I run regularly. Progress went from
being able to run/walk the route, to run only, to reducing the time for
one lap of trail loop, etc. In some respects, that could be considered
looking at splits, but I wanted to plant the idea that you don't need a
track or garmin or whatever - just the time it takes between landmarks
can be a useful benchmark.

That said, I use heartrate data for logging info. Since I run on hilly
trails, snow, and whatever else happens to be out there, pace is a
number that varies with terrain, wind, temperature, and probably a few
other environmental factors plus the effort I put in. I'm most
interested in my effort (HR), since that's what's indicating whether I'm
getting cardio benefits. Pace is sometimes more of a mechanical or
neuromuscular parameter, which can be important.

But there's no need to make running complicated.

I've barely started reading it, but have skimmed a lot of it (couldn't
wait), but "Healthy Intelligent Training" by Livingstone looks like a
neat approach to training. It's basically Lydiard written with many
things explained in more detail than in Lydiard's books. It's written by
someone that grew up near him and trained under him for a period. It's
got a nice blend of cardio and neuromuscular aspect of training.
Physiology is the same, whether training for 800m or ultra. It's just a
matter of what aspects you focus on.

Dot

--
"Often, quantity of miles is not the answer, but rather quality, i.e.
making your traiing specific to your goals.... The key was specificity
of training balanced with the volume." - Scott Jurek (quoted in Trail
Runner 49:16, Dec 2007)

  #2  
Old March 2nd 09, 06:43 AM posted to rec.running
Dot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,791
Default HRM, Stopwatch, Distance, Feel

Pete wrote:
On Mar 2, 3:15 pm, Dot wrote:

I'm a casual, recreational runner, but I like to play for a long time.
(For me, the best type of data may be how picturesque the route was =
how many pictures.) Some reasonably intelligent training helps one run
more and faster and longer.

Just because one is a recreational runner doesn't mean some of the
training knowledge accumulated over the decades is useless. In fact, it
can help you have a more fun time.



I think the data helps me in this department. I enjoy running, but the
having the numbers to beat and the goals set, actually is an enjoyable
part of it for me. Don't get me wrong though, when I'm out running in
the morning and I see the sun come up, it helps me ignore everything
else and I can appreciate the start of a new day before getting back
into it.


Hmmm, are you a "casual" runner or a numbers geek?



Am I allowed to be both Ha


Permission granted. I am.


None of the above info is necessary. You can just go run listening to your breathing. If
you can talk, you're ok. If you're gasping you're most likely running
too hard. I have some routes that I run regularly. Progress went from
being able to run/walk the route, to run only, to reducing the time for
one lap of trail loop, etc. In some respects, that could be considered
looking at splits, but I wanted to plant the idea that you don't need a
track or garmin or whatever - just the time it takes between landmarks
can be a useful benchmark.

That said, I use heartrate data for logging info. Since I run on hilly
trails, snow, and whatever else happens to be out there, pace is a
number that varies with terrain, wind, temperature, and probably a few
other environmental factors plus the effort I put in. I'm most
interested in my effort (HR), since that's what's indicating whether I'm
getting cardio benefits. Pace is sometimes more of a mechanical or
neuromuscular parameter, which can be important.

But there's no need to make running complicated.

I've barely started reading it, but have skimmed a lot of it (couldn't
wait), but "Healthy Intelligent Training" by Livingstone looks like a
neat approach to training. It's basically Lydiard written with many
things explained in more detail than in Lydiard's books. It's written by
someone that grew up near him and trained under him for a period. It's
got a nice blend of cardio and neuromuscular aspect of training.
Physiology is the same, whether training for 800m or ultra. It's just a
matter of what aspects you focus on.



I guess everyone learns and focuses and is pushed in different ways,
so it's good to hear how other people train and what they find useful.
That way I can try different things and see what works best for me. I
think I have recently that it also takes a while for the data to
change, regardless of what you're measuring or how you're measuring
it! But when you start to feel and see those changes, it encourages
you even more.


I've found I feel changes before they show up significantly in numbers.
All of a sudden (more of a quantum leap), a run just seemed easier or
realized I ran the whole way without walking (you need to see my
trails). Because of the noise with trail conditions, numbers are
sometimes hard to interpret, but I'll feel stronger.

So one of the biggest things is that what ever I
decided helps me best, to make sure I keep on recording that data so I
can look back every couple of months and see where I've come from and
realise the change. That I will hopefully be encouraged to keep
pushing myself in whatever I do!

My next goal. Do it the same, but better!


Yep. Good luck.

Dot

--
"Often, quantity of miles is not the answer, but rather quality, i.e.
making your traiing specific to your goals.... The key was specificity
of training balanced with the volume." - Scott Jurek (quoted in Trail
Runner 49:16, Dec 2007)

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
HRM, Stopwatch, Distance, Feel Elflord Running 1 March 7th 09 07:45 PM
HRM, Stopwatch, Distance, Feel [email protected] Running 2 March 1st 09 07:10 PM
HRM, Stopwatch, Distance, Feel Doug Freese Running 0 March 1st 09 12:54 PM
stopwatch autumn Running 3 July 21st 03 07:30 PM
stopwatch autumn Swimming 2 July 21st 03 07:30 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:19 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 FitnessBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.