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Using GPS instead of maps



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 19th 15, 05:49 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
Nick Maclaren[_4_]
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Posts: 9
Default Using GPS instead of maps


Does anyone have experience of wide-area touring and navigation using a
GPS device? I have an Etrex 20 and an OpenStreetMap mapping
(talkytoaster), as an experiment, and found it hopelessly painful to
use, mainly because of lack of resolution and secondarily lack of oomph
(especially noticeable when scaling and scrolling).

The map was hopeless in the Highlands (seriously off-road), because it
had only 50m contours (if I recall) and few locations were named, but
OK in the more populated areas.

The fancier devices seem to have event lower resolutions and, while, it
is possible that the very expensive Ordnance survey maps are better,
I am somewhat doubtful. And then there is Satmap ....

Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
  #2  
Old October 20th 15, 10:35 AM posted to uk.rec.walking
Nick Maclaren[_5_]
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Posts: 4
Default Using GPS instead of maps

On 10/20/15 07:27, Bob Mannix wrote:
No but I would take issue with one of your assertions. I get my OS maps
from Dash4it.co.uk. Currently Explorer maps are 5.84. With free 1st

class
p&p and guaranteed latest version, I would say they aren't expensive.
When they privatise the OS we will realise just what a bargain they were,
I fear!


Effectively, they have done, but that's for that link. I wasn't
referring to the paper maps, but to the 'GPS' ones, and it's not the raw
price so much as the constraints you get for your money.

Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
  #3  
Old October 20th 15, 02:17 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
Gordon H[_4_]
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Posts: 61
Default Using GPS instead of maps

On 20/10/2015 10:35, Nick Maclaren wrote:
On 10/20/15 07:27, Bob Mannix wrote:
No but I would take issue with one of your assertions. I get my OS maps
from Dash4it.co.uk. Currently Explorer maps are 5.84. With free 1st

class
p&p and guaranteed latest version, I would say they aren't expensive.
When they privatise the OS we will realise just what a bargain they
were,
I fear!


Effectively, they have done, but that's for that link. I wasn't
referring to the paper maps, but to the 'GPS' ones, and it's not the raw
price so much as the constraints you get for your money.

Regards,
Nick Maclaren.


Satmap maps are excellent, but expensive[1]. This doesn't bother me
because the Custom 20k x 20k map I bought from Satmap, centred on my
home, covers nearly all the walks I do these days.
I have the 1/25,000 1/50,000 version, which zooms through from a rough
world map to the 1:25,000 scale map which can be magnified if you
continue zooming.

[1] If you're sitting down... ;-) I think the Peak District map cost
about 100, discounted to 70 when purchased with the Satmap.
--
Gordon H

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  #4  
Old October 20th 15, 02:45 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
Phil Cook[_2_]
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Posts: 826
Default Using GPS instead of maps

On 19/10/2015 17:49, Nick Maclaren wrote:
Does anyone have experience of wide-area touring and navigation using a
GPS device? I have an Etrex 20 and an OpenStreetMap mapping
(talkytoaster), as an experiment, and found it hopelessly painful to
use, mainly because of lack of resolution and secondarily lack of oomph
(especially noticeable when scaling and scrolling).

The map was hopeless in the Highlands (seriously off-road), because it
had only 50m contours (if I recall) and few locations were named, but
OK in the more populated areas.


I use the contours from the MCoS as my upland map in my GPS and I
think they go down to 10m interval as you zoom in. I have a smart
phone with raster road maps and OS 50k and have used that for small
area walks (even up a Munro) but it is frustrating to use for longer
walks due to the postage stamp effect. For driving it works rather
better but it is still best to have a paper atlas to see off the edge
of your immediate area.
--
Phil Cook
  #5  
Old October 20th 15, 02:53 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
Bob Douglas[_3_]
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Posts: 6
Default Using GPS instead of maps

"Gordon H" wrote in message ...
[1] If you're sitting down... ;-) I think the Peak District map cost
about 100, discounted to 70 when purchased with the Satmap.
--
Gordon H


I think your pricing must be from before the point where the OS revised its
licence fees.

Current RRP for the Satmap Peak District 1:25K/1:50K toggleable is 35.
(which, though not cheap is an improvement on your experience :-) )

Other maps also dropped in price.

I quite like my Satmap, and if you are selective the maps aren't *too*
expensive.

It is OK used "standalone", but because of the restricted "window" it is
better used with planned/downloaded routes, and the (online) Satmap
expedition tools are pretty good, though better if you subscribe the 20 per
year to get access to larger scale and a wider repertoire of maps.

Quite useful on my bike, as well.

  #6  
Old October 20th 15, 05:58 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
Volker Gringmuth[_2_]
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Posts: 7
Default Using GPS instead of maps

Nick Maclaren wrote:

Does anyone have experience of wide-area touring and navigation using a
GPS device? I have an Etrex 20 and an OpenStreetMap mapping
(talkytoaster), as an experiment, and found it hopelessly painful to
use, mainly because of lack of resolution and secondarily lack of oomph
(especially noticeable when scaling and scrolling).


Comfort depends mainly on the device used. My Garmin Montana is a bit large
to be carried in my pants pockets but I found it extremely helpful in the
wild on my last walking holiday in the Yorkshire Dales. Touchscreen is a
must to scroll the map.

One big plus of GPS maps is the ability to zoom in nearly infinitely,
especially with OSM based material. Assumed that the mapping has been done
carefully, it’s easy to tell whether the footpath continues to the left or
right of that wall ahead, when the green dotted line in the OS map just
centralizes above it.

Route details like the FPs in
http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=19/54.38069/-2.07691 or
http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=19/54.38451/-1.52341 simply cannot be
gained from a 1:25.000 OS map, since you’d need a much larger scale to fit
these fine details in. (You can always rely on paths I have been walking
before, they will be accurately mapped on OSM afterwards.)

To get an overview, on the other hand, paper maps are much better, of
course. Just because of their size. A 3 or 4 inches display cannot compare
to that.

The map was hopeless in the Highlands (seriously off-road), because it
had only 50m contours (if I recall) and few locations were named, but
OK in the more populated areas.


OpenStreetMap is a community. Join in and start adding place names, we can’t
do it all ourselves :-)


vG
  #7  
Old October 20th 15, 06:39 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
Nick Maclaren[_5_]
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Posts: 4
Default Using GPS instead of maps

On 10/20/15 14:45, Phil Cook wrote:

I use the contours from the MCoS as my upland map in my GPS and I think
they go down to 10m interval as you zoom in. I have a smart phone with
raster road maps and OS 50k and have used that for small area walks
(even up a Munro) but it is frustrating to use for longer walks due to
the postage stamp effect.


Thanks very much. But MCoS? The Web indicates Modern Church of Satan,
which seems a little OTT.

Regards,
Nick Maclaren.

  #8  
Old October 20th 15, 06:42 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
Nick Maclaren[_5_]
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Posts: 4
Default Using GPS instead of maps

On 10/20/15 17:58, Volker Gringmuth wrote:

OpenStreetMap is a community. Join in and start adding place names, we can’t
do it all ourselves :-)


Oh, yes, but I am already involved with quite a lot of other such
projects, and would need to spend the time learning how to do that.

Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
  #9  
Old October 20th 15, 08:49 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
Stewart Robert Hinsley
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Posts: 84
Default Using GPS instead of maps

On 19/10/2015 17:49, Nick Maclaren wrote:
Does anyone have experience of wide-area touring and navigation using a
GPS device? I have an Etrex 20 and an OpenStreetMap mapping
(talkytoaster), as an experiment, and found it hopelessly painful to
use, mainly because of lack of resolution and secondarily lack of oomph
(especially noticeable when scaling and scrolling).


I have the same; it's only really useful in urban areas, where you can
zoom into streetmap level. Possibly I need to learn to customise the
display, but field boundaries aren't shown. And coverage of paths and
parish boundaries, inter alia, varies between areas.


The map was hopeless in the Highlands (seriously off-road), because it
had only 50m contours (if I recall) and few locations were named, but
OK in the more populated areas.

The fancier devices seem to have event lower resolutions and, while, it
is possible that the very expensive Ordnance survey maps are better,
I am somewhat doubtful. And then there is Satmap ....


I've also used NavFree on an GPS enabled Android tablet (Hudl 2). At
least you can see a decent amount of territory on the screen that way.

The latest print editions of OS 1:25,000 maps have download keys for
digital versions for use with the OS Mapping ap. I bought a new edition
of the Dark Peak map recently, because where I wanted to walk was in a
gap between the coverage of the older edition I owned and the next
Explorer map, which is how I discovered this. So, I ended up navigating
that bit of territory using the Hudl rather than the physical map.

As I'm sure you know, you need the physical map as backup for when the
batteries run out.

Regards,
Nick Maclaren.

--
SRH
  #10  
Old October 21st 15, 07:57 AM posted to uk.rec.walking
Terry Pinnell[_2_]
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Posts: 15
Default Using GPS instead of maps

(Nick Maclaren) wrote:


Does anyone have experience of wide-area touring and navigation using a
GPS device? I have an Etrex 20 and an OpenStreetMap mapping
(talkytoaster), as an experiment, and found it hopelessly painful to
use, mainly because of lack of resolution and secondarily lack of oomph
(especially noticeable when scaling and scrolling).

The map was hopeless in the Highlands (seriously off-road), because it
had only 50m contours (if I recall) and few locations were named, but
OK in the more populated areas.

The fancier devices seem to have event lower resolutions and, while, it
is possible that the very expensive Ordnance survey maps are better,
I am somewhat doubtful. And then there is Satmap ....

Regards,
Nick Maclaren.


I've been using a GPS device of one sort or another for many years.
Currently use OS 1:25k with Memory-Map on my desktop and smartphone
and wouldn't like to be without this technology. As you know from the
paper equivalent, the level of detail is sufficient to decide which
side of a field boundary hedge you're on. My walks are a mixture of
local (Sussex, Kent, Surrey), holiday walking (both led, e.g. by HF.
or self-led, e.g, on national trails) in various parts of the UK and
Europe.

Disadvantages include:
- the small window already mentioned.
- difficult to view in bright sunlight
- occasional signal loss, especially in woods and steep valleys.
- reliance on its battery (I always carry a spare).

Advantages off the top of my head include:
- GPS device tells you where you are, to within a few feet; a paper
map doesn't even hazard a guess!
- pre-planned routes are easily displayed and removed, including
'escape' or 'wimp out' options.
- shows current distance traveled, duration and average speed
- digital capture of all data for later work and permanent record; I
include all my walks in videos/DVDs and also in paper form in a set of
4-hole binders (612 so far).
- easy identification of locations from which photos were taken.
- zooming provides a more readable detail view than the paper map
(without a magnifying glass).
- no unfolding/folding issues
- usable in light rain or strong wind
- typical walker's paper maps are probably older (and therefore more
inaccurate) than the equivalent GPS user with digital versions

--
Terry, East Grinstead, UK
 




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