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Please tell me this is a legal bench press



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 8th 03, 04:23 PM
Steve Freides
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Please tell me this is a legal bench press

I spent a while with the empty bar, when a while with 115 lbs., and the
video is 115 x 5, all with a much narrower grip which seems to let me have
more control over the bar. Video is :40 long, I'm pretty sure the first 3
are legal and the last 2 aren't. I did 2 sets of 115x5, looked at the first
one on video, decided the pauses still weren't long enough, and really tried
to get the bar to feel like it was completely still and in that position for
at least a little while before I pressed it back up.

Many thanks in advance.

Any comments on grip width also welcomed; I feel that I have trouble feeling
strong at the bottom with a wide grip - the narrow grip, elbows closer to my
sides, just feels better and much more resembles all the kettlebell pressing
I do as well as the martial arts training I've had, so the current plan will
be to try and work with this grip, which is pinkies just inside the knurling
rings, for a while and see how that goes. I'm not a huge person and I don't
think this exactly qualifies as a 'narrow' grip for me. It's also worth
mentioning that I've always hated rows and anything that brings my elbow
past my body line, which the bottom position of the bench press does, so
some rows and/or just some more time with even longer pauses might be what I
need to get the bar stable at the bottom.

Again, thanks in advance.

-S-


  #2  
Old December 8th 03, 04:34 PM
Sooky Grumper
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Please tell me this is a legal bench press

Steve Freides wrote:
I spent a while with the empty bar, when a while with 115 lbs., and the
video is 115 x 5, all with a much narrower grip which seems to let me have
more control over the bar. Video is :40 long, I'm pretty sure the first 3
are legal and the last 2 aren't. I did 2 sets of 115x5, looked at the first
one on video, decided the pauses still weren't long enough, and really tried
to get the bar to feel like it was completely still and in that position for
at least a little while before I pressed it back up.

Many thanks in advance.


Please post a url.


Any comments on grip width also welcomed; I feel that I have trouble feeling
strong at the bottom with a wide grip - the narrow grip, elbows closer to my
sides, just feels better and much more resembles all the kettlebell pressing
I do as well as the martial arts training I've had, so the current plan will
be to try and work with this grip, which is pinkies just inside the knurling
rings, for a while and see how that goes.


I prefer narrower, too. My shoulders like it better, and I feel stronger.

I'm not a huge person and I don't
think this exactly qualifies as a 'narrow' grip for me. It's also worth
mentioning that I've always hated rows and anything that brings my elbow
past my body line, which the bottom position of the bench press does, so
some rows and/or just some more time with even longer pauses might be what I
need to get the bar stable at the bottom.

Again, thanks in advance.

-S-




--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

  #3  
Old December 8th 03, 04:39 PM
Steve Freides
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Please tell me this is a legal bench press

Duh - my bad.

http://www.kbnj.com/bench_6.rm

-S-

"Sooky Grumper" wrote in message
...
Steve Freides wrote:
I spent a while with the empty bar, when a while with 115 lbs., and the
video is 115 x 5, all with a much narrower grip which seems to let me

have
more control over the bar. Video is :40 long, I'm pretty sure the

first 3
are legal and the last 2 aren't. I did 2 sets of 115x5, looked at the

first
one on video, decided the pauses still weren't long enough, and really

tried
to get the bar to feel like it was completely still and in that position

for
at least a little while before I pressed it back up.

Many thanks in advance.


Please post a url.


Any comments on grip width also welcomed; I feel that I have trouble

feeling
strong at the bottom with a wide grip - the narrow grip, elbows closer

to my
sides, just feels better and much more resembles all the kettlebell

pressing
I do as well as the martial arts training I've had, so the current plan

will
be to try and work with this grip, which is pinkies just inside the

knurling
rings, for a while and see how that goes.


I prefer narrower, too. My shoulders like it better, and I feel stronger.

I'm not a huge person and I don't
think this exactly qualifies as a 'narrow' grip for me. It's also worth
mentioning that I've always hated rows and anything that brings my elbow
past my body line, which the bottom position of the bench press does, so
some rows and/or just some more time with even longer pauses might be

what I
need to get the bar stable at the bottom.

Again, thanks in advance.

-S-




--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo



  #4  
Old December 8th 03, 04:52 PM
Will
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Please tell me this is a legal bench press

In article ,
"Steve Freides" wrote:

I spent a while with the empty bar, when a while with 115 lbs., and the
video is 115 x 5, all with a much narrower grip which seems to let me have
more control over the bar. Video is :40 long, I'm pretty sure the first 3
are legal and the last 2 aren't.


That's how I'd call it.

Any comments on grip width also welcomed; I feel that I have trouble feeling
strong at the bottom with a wide grip - the narrow grip, elbows closer to my
sides, just feels better and much more resembles all the kettlebell pressing
I do as well as the martial arts training I've had, so the current plan will
be to try and work with this grip, which is pinkies just inside the knurling
rings, for a while and see how that goes.


If it works for you, go with it. Personally I feel stronger off the
shest with a wide grip and lockout better with a narrow grip but
everyone's different. I suspect in the long run you'll be able to lift
a bit more with a wider grip as long as you don't run into trouble with
your shiulders holding up to the wide grip.

I'm not a huge person and I don't
think this exactly qualifies as a 'narrow' grip for me. It's also worth
mentioning that I've always hated rows and anything that brings my elbow
past my body line, which the bottom position of the bench press does, so
some rows and/or just some more time with even longer pauses might be what I
need to get the bar stable at the bottom.


I think the rows would be a good idea. I'm not sure you really want to
work on even longer pauses, my first priority if I were you would be to
work on being able to bring the bar to a dead stop fast so you don't
need to spend so long on your chest.
  #5  
Old December 8th 03, 04:58 PM
Chupacabra
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Please tell me this is a legal bench press

On Mon, 8 Dec 2003 11:39:05 -0500, "Steve Freides"
wrote:

Duh - my bad.

http://www.kbnj.com/bench_6.rm

-S-


It looks to me like the bar never entirely comes to rest on your
chest. There's always a little hitch or hiccup. Having never competed,
I've no idea whether this would be enough to red light you, but it may
be.


"Sooky Grumper" wrote in message
...
Steve Freides wrote:
I spent a while with the empty bar, when a while with 115 lbs., and the
video is 115 x 5, all with a much narrower grip which seems to let me

have
more control over the bar. Video is :40 long, I'm pretty sure the

first 3
are legal and the last 2 aren't. I did 2 sets of 115x5, looked at the

first
one on video, decided the pauses still weren't long enough, and really

tried
to get the bar to feel like it was completely still and in that position

for
at least a little while before I pressed it back up.

Many thanks in advance.


Please post a url.


Any comments on grip width also welcomed; I feel that I have trouble

feeling
strong at the bottom with a wide grip - the narrow grip, elbows closer

to my
sides, just feels better and much more resembles all the kettlebell

pressing
I do as well as the martial arts training I've had, so the current plan

will
be to try and work with this grip, which is pinkies just inside the

knurling
rings, for a while and see how that goes.


I prefer narrower, too. My shoulders like it better, and I feel stronger.

I'm not a huge person and I don't
think this exactly qualifies as a 'narrow' grip for me. It's also worth
mentioning that I've always hated rows and anything that brings my elbow
past my body line, which the bottom position of the bench press does, so
some rows and/or just some more time with even longer pauses might be

what I
need to get the bar stable at the bottom.

Again, thanks in advance.

-S-




--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo



  #6  
Old December 8th 03, 05:07 PM
Keith Hobman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Please tell me this is a legal bench press

In article , "Steve Freides"
wrote:

I spent a while with the empty bar, when a while with 115 lbs., and the
video is 115 x 5, all with a much narrower grip which seems to let me have
more control over the bar. Video is :40 long, I'm pretty sure the first 3
are legal and the last 2 aren't. I did 2 sets of 115x5, looked at the first
one on video, decided the pauses still weren't long enough, and really tried
to get the bar to feel like it was completely still and in that position for
at least a little while before I pressed it back up.

Many thanks in advance.

Any comments on grip width also welcomed; I feel that I have trouble feeling
strong at the bottom with a wide grip - the narrow grip, elbows closer to my
sides, just feels better and much more resembles all the kettlebell pressing
I do as well as the martial arts training I've had, so the current plan will
be to try and work with this grip, which is pinkies just inside the knurling
rings, for a while and see how that goes. I'm not a huge person and I don't
think this exactly qualifies as a 'narrow' grip for me. It's also worth
mentioning that I've always hated rows and anything that brings my elbow
past my body line, which the bottom position of the bench press does, so
some rows and/or just some more time with even longer pauses might be what I
need to get the bar stable at the bottom.


Okay, if I get into venting mode I want Steve to know its not directed at him.

First, yes they are legal for the most part.

Second - you are not in a competition cycle. You are in a base cycle. Not
only that you are a rank beginner in the lift. So you should be analyzing
technique and determining what will allow you to lift most effectively.
You should be analyzing strength in the movement and determining what you
have to work on. Often they are the same thing.

So to say, "I think narrow grip feels better." and therefore decide that
is what you are going to do isn't going to cut it. I see this all the
time. Especially with the sumo deadlift people will try it and then say,
"Not for me. I'm not built for sumo." Mebbe, but they don't know that!
Because they may have weak areas which prevent them from getting a lot of
weight up with the sumo. The problem isn't their build, its their weak
areas.

What you are doing in the bench is an arms only, bodybuilding style bench.
You are having some problems with stability at the bottom of the bench and
you are trying to fix it with grip width?

No way Steve. Your base is weak. You are creating some tension in the
legs (I think - hard to tell from the images), but your basic base
position is weak. You are basically doing an upper body only bench and
tightening your legs, but they are contributing nothing to the lift.

You know what I think you should be doing? Working on your lower back
flexibility and strength, arching more, getting your feet underneath you
more and widening your grip on the bar.

Remember - its not what you are lifting now, its what you do come
competition time. Too often people are unwilling to bite the bullet in
training and work on optimal technique because initially they use less
weight that way. But what matter is down the road.

You have to get strong in your base and get your body into this lift. Time
to start bridging as assistance. I'd be doing both hindu push-ups and back
bridges from Furey's Royal Court if I were you.

I'd be lowering the weight and gripping much wider in an effort to shorten
my bench stroke. I'd be working on getting my chest up into the bar. Right
now triceps strength isn't an issue. If it was you could use the
kettlebell press as assitance.

Get your scapula adducted and free at the start of the movement. You look
like you have the scapula abducted. Get the shoulders shrugged down.
Spread the bar! How can you spread the bar at all with that grip? You
can't, and it takes your back completely out of the lift.

Right now you are benching like a bodybuilder. I know you are worried
about your back, but that can be trained. If I were you I'd get at it.
Work the base and technique - and then 6-8 weeks down the road start
adding on the plates.

--
Keith Hobman

--- email address above is a non-monitored spam sink.
  #7  
Old December 8th 03, 05:34 PM
Steve Freides
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Please tell me this is a legal bench press

"Keith Hobman" wrote in message
...
In article , "Steve Freides"
wrote:

I spent a while with the empty bar, when a while with 115 lbs., and the
video is 115 x 5, all with a much narrower grip which seems to let me

have
more control over the bar. Video is :40 long, I'm pretty sure the

first 3
are legal and the last 2 aren't. I did 2 sets of 115x5, looked at the

first
one on video, decided the pauses still weren't long enough, and really

tried
to get the bar to feel like it was completely still and in that position

for
at least a little while before I pressed it back up.

Many thanks in advance.

Any comments on grip width also welcomed; I feel that I have trouble

feeling
strong at the bottom with a wide grip - the narrow grip, elbows closer

to my
sides, just feels better and much more resembles all the kettlebell

pressing
I do as well as the martial arts training I've had, so the current plan

will
be to try and work with this grip, which is pinkies just inside the

knurling
rings, for a while and see how that goes. I'm not a huge person and I

don't
think this exactly qualifies as a 'narrow' grip for me. It's also worth
mentioning that I've always hated rows and anything that brings my elbow
past my body line, which the bottom position of the bench press does, so
some rows and/or just some more time with even longer pauses might be

what I
need to get the bar stable at the bottom.


Okay, if I get into venting mode I want Steve to know its not directed at

him.

Understood.

First, yes they are legal for the most part.


sigh of relief - at least I did something right

Second - you are not in a competition cycle. You are in a base cycle. Not
only that you are a rank beginner in the lift. So you should be analyzing
technique and determining what will allow you to lift most effectively.
You should be analyzing strength in the movement and determining what you
have to work on. Often they are the same thing.

So to say, "I think narrow grip feels better." and therefore decide that
is what you are going to do isn't going to cut it. I see this all the
time. Especially with the sumo deadlift people will try it and then say,
"Not for me. I'm not built for sumo." Mebbe, but they don't know that!
Because they may have weak areas which prevent them from getting a lot of
weight up with the sumo. The problem isn't their build, its their weak
areas.

What you are doing in the bench is an arms only, bodybuilding style bench.
You are having some problems with stability at the bottom of the bench and
you are trying to fix it with grip width?

No way Steve. Your base is weak. You are creating some tension in the
legs (I think - hard to tell from the images), but your basic base
position is weak. You are basically doing an upper body only bench and
tightening your legs, but they are contributing nothing to the lift.

You know what I think you should be doing? Working on your lower back
flexibility and strength, arching more, getting your feet underneath you
more and widening your grip on the bar.

Remember - its not what you are lifting now, its what you do come
competition time. Too often people are unwilling to bite the bullet in
training and work on optimal technique because initially they use less
weight that way. But what matter is down the road.

You have to get strong in your base and get your body into this lift. Time
to start bridging as assistance. I'd be doing both hindu push-ups and back
bridges from Furey's Royal Court if I were you.


The whole lower back issue is problematic for me, Keith, as I know you know,
but some particulars are relevant here. I had started bridging a few weeks
before I started benching and was making some progress with it but the right
side of my lower back is, as it's been, pretty messed up. It hurts every
time I try to get up from benching. Nothing I can't deal with but
consciously arching my lower back in the way benching demands is going to
take me a few years to work into, I'm sure. My lower back is getting a
workout from benching like it's never had before and I'm happy that it's
getting used to it, albeit slowly, and not otherwise giving me indications
that benching isn't something I can do. I literally can barely get up off
the bench if I don't do a few bicycling motions with my legs to shake out
the tightness in my lower back first.

All that is my way of saying that I've got as much lower back in my bench
right now as my lower back can stand. My back's holding up fine to
deadlifting and squatting - I did my first 1.5x bodyweight squat last
night - but benching is really being tough. I feel I've got a very high
tolerance for pain as well as a finely-honed sense of what's good pain and
what's bad pain in terms of my lower back. Trust me when I say it's good
pain in this case but also trust me when I say I can't stand any more of it
than I'm in. Right now I don't know if I could handle bridging and benching
at the same time. Maybe I'll bench a little less and add bridges back in
and see what that does for me. The good news is that it doesn't hurt when
I'm benching, only when I try to get up afterwards.

A few years ago, when I was 2 or 3 years out from my back injury and not the
6+ years I am now, I tried those exercise where you lay on a bench and curl
up your spine, Superman kinds of things. They always bothered me and I
could never do them for more than a week or two without having to put them
aside. I could try them as well but I don't hold out much hope. Bridging
seems to be at least bearable. I work McKenzie back exercises several times
a day - I have to - but they're a different, passive kind of flexibility.

I'd be lowering the weight and gripping much wider in an effort to shorten
my bench stroke. I'd be working on getting my chest up into the bar. Right
now triceps strength isn't an issue. If it was you could use the
kettlebell press as assitance.


I agree triceps strength is not an issue at this time. I did work with just
the bar and a much lower weight today but I'm not sure how else to train my
back to bench press except by bench pressing. Time and time again, in my
own exercise life, I've found specificity matters a lot, and as a result I
don't do much that you could call assistance work - I work the movements I
want to get good at. A lot of this is because I've got to find a groove for
my back in each movement I do. This is why I think I probably need to work
on benching with enough weight to keep my back involved and getting
stronger - because I won't learn how to handle this with my back in any
other way.

Get your scapula adducted and free at the start of the movement. You look
like you have the scapula abducted. Get the shoulders shrugged down.
Spread the bar! How can you spread the bar at all with that grip? You
can't, and it takes your back completely out of the lift.


Alright, I'll stop being a wuss and go back to the wider grip. This was the
first day I tried this narrow a grip although I've been trying narrower and
narrow the last couple of days.

Right now you are benching like a bodybuilder. I know you are worried
about your back, but that can be trained. If I were you I'd get at it.
Work the base and technique - and then 6-8 weeks down the road start
adding on the plates.


An empty bar all the time won't work for me, I don't think, but I've tacked
other problematic movements in the past via what I call mini-cycles - I'll
start with the bar and add a bit of weight for 2 or 3 days then go back to
the bar again and start all over. It's worked for me before and I'll try it
again here.

Anything else you want to rant, er, suggest , I'm all ears. Thanks, bro'.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


--
Keith Hobman

--- email address above is a non-monitored spam sink.



  #8  
Old December 8th 03, 07:01 PM
Keith Hobman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Please tell me this is a legal bench press

In article , "Steve Freides"
wrote:

[snip]

sigh of relief - at least I did something right


oh crap, I always come across like that.

You are doing a lot of things right Steve. One of the problems of being
critical is that I neglect to mention the things that are going right.
Especially in terms of base strength.

So please don't take my criticism as anything other than wanting the best
for you.

[snip]

The whole lower back issue is problematic for me, Keith, as I know you know,
but some particulars are relevant here. I had started bridging a few weeks
before I started benching and was making some progress with it but the right
side of my lower back is, as it's been, pretty messed up. It hurts every
time I try to get up from benching. Nothing I can't deal with but
consciously arching my lower back in the way benching demands is going to
take me a few years to work into, I'm sure. My lower back is getting a
workout from benching like it's never had before and I'm happy that it's
getting used to it, albeit slowly, and not otherwise giving me indications
that benching isn't something I can do. I literally can barely get up off
the bench if I don't do a few bicycling motions with my legs to shake out
the tightness in my lower back first.

All that is my way of saying that I've got as much lower back in my bench
right now as my lower back can stand. My back's holding up fine to
deadlifting and squatting - I did my first 1.5x bodyweight squat last
night - but benching is really being tough. I feel I've got a very high
tolerance for pain as well as a finely-honed sense of what's good pain and
what's bad pain in terms of my lower back. Trust me when I say it's good
pain in this case but also trust me when I say I can't stand any more of it
than I'm in. Right now I don't know if I could handle bridging and benching
at the same time. Maybe I'll bench a little less and add bridges back in
and see what that does for me. The good news is that it doesn't hurt when
I'm benching, only when I try to get up afterwards.

A few years ago, when I was 2 or 3 years out from my back injury and not the
6+ years I am now, I tried those exercise where you lay on a bench and curl
up your spine, Superman kinds of things. They always bothered me and I
could never do them for more than a week or two without having to put them
aside. I could try them as well but I don't hold out much hope. Bridging
seems to be at least bearable. I work McKenzie back exercises several times
a day - I have to - but they're a different, passive kind of flexibility.

I'd be lowering the weight and gripping much wider in an effort to shorten
my bench stroke. I'd be working on getting my chest up into the bar. Right
now triceps strength isn't an issue. If it was you could use the
kettlebell press as assitance.


I agree triceps strength is not an issue at this time. I did work with just
the bar and a much lower weight today but I'm not sure how else to train my
back to bench press except by bench pressing. Time and time again, in my
own exercise life, I've found specificity matters a lot, and as a result I
don't do much that you could call assistance work - I work the movements I
want to get good at. A lot of this is because I've got to find a groove for
my back in each movement I do. This is why I think I probably need to work
on benching with enough weight to keep my back involved and getting
stronger - because I won't learn how to handle this with my back in any
other way.

Get your scapula adducted and free at the start of the movement. You look
like you have the scapula abducted. Get the shoulders shrugged down.
Spread the bar! How can you spread the bar at all with that grip? You
can't, and it takes your back completely out of the lift.


Alright, I'll stop being a wuss and go back to the wider grip. This was the
first day I tried this narrow a grip although I've been trying narrower and
narrow the last couple of days.

Right now you are benching like a bodybuilder. I know you are worried
about your back, but that can be trained. If I were you I'd get at it.
Work the base and technique - and then 6-8 weeks down the road start
adding on the plates.


An empty bar all the time won't work for me, I don't think, but I've tacked
other problematic movements in the past via what I call mini-cycles - I'll
start with the bar and add a bit of weight for 2 or 3 days then go back to
the bar again and start all over. It's worked for me before and I'll try it
again here.

Anything else you want to rant, er, suggest , I'm all ears. Thanks, bro'.


Zallright. Sorry about the hyper-critical tone. I wasn't aware the back
pathology was this serious.

If you can't arch then I suggest trying the Westside method of driving the
shoulders into the bench.

Basically push with your feet, lock your lower back and glutes and do the
same thing I was suggesting with the shoulders. Either way I'd like to see
some tension throughout your entire body and not the separation into body
tension and then a shoulder/chest/triceps lift. Try and get that scapula
freed and drive the traps and upper shoulder into the bench. You actually
push with your feet - you may have to do something with your bench set-up.

Another thing that may work is grab the bench with your legs. But try and
get the entire body tight and start the by pushing with your feet. Not
upwards, which hurts the back. Push backwards like you are trying to slide
you shoulders off the bench.

I'd still go wider and use that Pavel method of creating tension through
the whole body. Push the feet, grab with the legs so your hips don't go up
(you'll have to bring your feet in closer together), tighten the glutes,
push the abs out after taking in some air and spread the bar. Keep the
shoulders (scapula) adducted.

Man. Lots to think about!

Oh yeah, get the bar over your chest just a little more at the start.

--
Keith Hobman

--- email address above is a non-monitored spam sink.
  #10  
Old December 8th 03, 07:49 PM
Steve Freides
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Please tell me this is a legal bench press

I'm out on-site now but I will read this in more detail this evening.
Forgive the top-post but the bandwidth where I am stinks.

The back is definitely serious but I'm not giving up on it yet. Deadlifting
was none too pretty at the beginning but I stuck with it and made a lot of
progress.

And I was just funnin' with ya about you ranting - don't worry about it. It
was a good rant, one I needed to hear, and one I'm glad you took the time to
write.

Later.

-S-

"Keith Hobman" wrote in message
...
In article , "Steve Freides"
wrote:

[snip]

sigh of relief - at least I did something right


oh crap, I always come across like that.

You are doing a lot of things right Steve. One of the problems of being
critical is that I neglect to mention the things that are going right.
Especially in terms of base strength.

So please don't take my criticism as anything other than wanting the best
for you.

[snip]

The whole lower back issue is problematic for me, Keith, as I know you

know,
but some particulars are relevant here. I had started bridging a few

weeks
before I started benching and was making some progress with it but the

right
side of my lower back is, as it's been, pretty messed up. It hurts

every
time I try to get up from benching. Nothing I can't deal with but
consciously arching my lower back in the way benching demands is going

to
take me a few years to work into, I'm sure. My lower back is getting a
workout from benching like it's never had before and I'm happy that it's
getting used to it, albeit slowly, and not otherwise giving me

indications
that benching isn't something I can do. I literally can barely get up

off
the bench if I don't do a few bicycling motions with my legs to shake

out
the tightness in my lower back first.

All that is my way of saying that I've got as much lower back in my

bench
right now as my lower back can stand. My back's holding up fine to
deadlifting and squatting - I did my first 1.5x bodyweight squat last
night - but benching is really being tough. I feel I've got a very high
tolerance for pain as well as a finely-honed sense of what's good pain

and
what's bad pain in terms of my lower back. Trust me when I say it's

good
pain in this case but also trust me when I say I can't stand any more of

it
than I'm in. Right now I don't know if I could handle bridging and

benching
at the same time. Maybe I'll bench a little less and add bridges back

in
and see what that does for me. The good news is that it doesn't hurt

when
I'm benching, only when I try to get up afterwards.

A few years ago, when I was 2 or 3 years out from my back injury and not

the
6+ years I am now, I tried those exercise where you lay on a bench and

curl
up your spine, Superman kinds of things. They always bothered me and I
could never do them for more than a week or two without having to put

them
aside. I could try them as well but I don't hold out much hope.

Bridging
seems to be at least bearable. I work McKenzie back exercises several

times
a day - I have to - but they're a different, passive kind of

flexibility.

I'd be lowering the weight and gripping much wider in an effort to

shorten
my bench stroke. I'd be working on getting my chest up into the bar.

Right
now triceps strength isn't an issue. If it was you could use the
kettlebell press as assitance.


I agree triceps strength is not an issue at this time. I did work with

just
the bar and a much lower weight today but I'm not sure how else to train

my
back to bench press except by bench pressing. Time and time again, in

my
own exercise life, I've found specificity matters a lot, and as a result

I
don't do much that you could call assistance work - I work the movements

I
want to get good at. A lot of this is because I've got to find a groove

for
my back in each movement I do. This is why I think I probably need to

work
on benching with enough weight to keep my back involved and getting
stronger - because I won't learn how to handle this with my back in any
other way.

Get your scapula adducted and free at the start of the movement. You

look
like you have the scapula abducted. Get the shoulders shrugged down.
Spread the bar! How can you spread the bar at all with that grip? You
can't, and it takes your back completely out of the lift.


Alright, I'll stop being a wuss and go back to the wider grip. This was

the
first day I tried this narrow a grip although I've been trying narrower

and
narrow the last couple of days.

Right now you are benching like a bodybuilder. I know you are worried
about your back, but that can be trained. If I were you I'd get at it.
Work the base and technique - and then 6-8 weeks down the road start
adding on the plates.


An empty bar all the time won't work for me, I don't think, but I've

tacked
other problematic movements in the past via what I call mini-cycles -

I'll
start with the bar and add a bit of weight for 2 or 3 days then go back

to
the bar again and start all over. It's worked for me before and I'll

try it
again here.

Anything else you want to rant, er, suggest , I'm all ears. Thanks,

bro'.

Zallright. Sorry about the hyper-critical tone. I wasn't aware the back
pathology was this serious.

If you can't arch then I suggest trying the Westside method of driving the
shoulders into the bench.

Basically push with your feet, lock your lower back and glutes and do the
same thing I was suggesting with the shoulders. Either way I'd like to see
some tension throughout your entire body and not the separation into body
tension and then a shoulder/chest/triceps lift. Try and get that scapula
freed and drive the traps and upper shoulder into the bench. You actually
push with your feet - you may have to do something with your bench set-up.

Another thing that may work is grab the bench with your legs. But try and
get the entire body tight and start the by pushing with your feet. Not
upwards, which hurts the back. Push backwards like you are trying to slide
you shoulders off the bench.

I'd still go wider and use that Pavel method of creating tension through
the whole body. Push the feet, grab with the legs so your hips don't go up
(you'll have to bring your feet in closer together), tighten the glutes,
push the abs out after taking in some air and spread the bar. Keep the
shoulders (scapula) adducted.

Man. Lots to think about!

Oh yeah, get the bar over your chest just a little more at the start.

--
Keith Hobman

--- email address above is a non-monitored spam sink.



 




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