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Bulls in fields



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 4th 03, 03:24 PM
Simon Challands
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Default Bulls in fields

In message t
Irish Murdoch wrote:

I've just got back from one of my favourite walking places: Warton Crag in
North Lancashire. At one point of the walk, however, I was forced, and not
for the first time, to modify my route slightly. This was because of that
sneaky old farmer's trick: putting bulls in a field that he really wishes
there wasn't a footpath across.


I've a nagging suspicion that that may be illegal (the bull, not modifying
your route!)

--
Simon Challands, creator of
The Acorn Elite Pages: http://elite.acornarcade.com/
Three Dimensional Encounters: http://www.3dfrontier.fsnet.co.uk/
  #2  
Old July 4th 03, 03:39 PM
Chris Street
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Default Bulls in fields

Simon Challands wrote:
In message t
Irish Murdoch wrote:


I've just got back from one of my favourite walking places: Warton Crag in
North Lancashire. At one point of the walk, however, I was forced, and not
for the first time, to modify my route slightly. This was because of that
sneaky old farmer's trick: putting bulls in a field that he really wishes
there wasn't a footpath across.



I've a nagging suspicion that that may be illegal (the bull, not modifying
your route!)



Bulls of any recognised dairy breed, Frisiain, Holstein et al are
illegal in a field to which which the public has access if they are over
ten months old. All other bulls over this age must be kept with cows or
heifers. If it's a lone full size bull - take a photo and complain to
the HSE.

Bulls may be harmless - however testing this theory with a ton of bull
preceded with sharp horns isn't a smart idea.....

  #3  
Old July 4th 03, 08:57 PM
Stuart
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Default Bulls in fields


Irish Murdoch wrote in message
e.net...
Is anybody else put off by bulls, or do
you all just stride blithely across their fields with ne'er a second

thought
of being gored? What are the chances of a bull even caring that you're in

its
fields?

Irish


speaking with some experiance of livestock.........95% of the time the bull
couldn't care less if you were in the same field, in fact if you went and
booted it up the backside it probably still couldn't care less , BUT and a
very big BUT, bulls are very unpredictable (with or without the company of
cows) if you find yourself in the same field as a bull NEVER take your eye
off it, and ALWAYS have an escape route planned, ie stay next to a fence you
can jump over.


  #4  
Old July 4th 03, 09:37 PM
peter hall
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Default Bulls in fields

Hi I've been a lurker for some time now and feel for the first time that I
may have something to add to the thread.
Having worked with cattle for over 30 years I must agree with previous
writers that Bulls must at all times be treated with caution. They can turn
remarkably, almost on a sixpence (2.5p for you young 'uns) and can easily
out-run a human. However I have never been hurt or even had a close shave
with a Bull (possibly because of my caution) whereas I have suffered broken
ribs and more bruises than I could count from cows and more again from young
heifers. To heifers play is fun, and a friendly crowd of heifers gently
knocking you about can be the most painful of all. Carry a stick and don't
be afraid to use it if challenged, the brief pain you inflict on the animal
is nothing to what they are capable of doing to you, and they will forget it
in no time.

Peter

"Stuart" wrote in message
...

Irish Murdoch wrote in message
e.net...
Is anybody else put off by bulls, or do
you all just stride blithely across their fields with ne'er a second

thought
of being gored? What are the chances of a bull even caring that you're

in
its
fields?

Irish


speaking with some experiance of livestock.........95% of the time the

bull
couldn't care less if you were in the same field, in fact if you went and
booted it up the backside it probably still couldn't care less , BUT and a
very big BUT, bulls are very unpredictable (with or without the company of
cows) if you find yourself in the same field as a bull NEVER take your eye
off it, and ALWAYS have an escape route planned, ie stay next to a fence

you
can jump over.




  #5  
Old July 4th 03, 10:08 PM
Martin Richardson
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Default Bulls in fields

In article t, Irish
Murdoch writes
Is anybody else put off by bulls, or do
you all just stride blithely across their fields with ne'er a second thought
of being gored? What are the chances of a bull even caring that you're in its
fields?

Many decades ago when I was an impoverished (I avoided the word poor,
because it could have been misinterpreted as referring to my ability as
a...) student, I had a summer job working as a chain man for the Essex
River Authority. Anyway, one day a surveyor and I we were surveying the
line of a small stream through a farm when I stuck the pole in a wasps
nest. Swarms of wasps engulfed us so we legged it into the next field
where, unbeknownst to us there was bull. This bull then chased the
surveyor who escaped by jumping over a fence right into the
aforementioned stream.
He was not happy with me after the event and made it very clear -
indeed, he refused to work with me again.


--
Martin Richardson

216/284 Munros (32/34 'Furths')
27/89 Donalds 372/1552 Marilyns 439/439 Nuttalls




  #6  
Old July 4th 03, 10:10 PM
Martin Richardson
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Posts: n/a
Default Bulls in fields

In article , peter hall
writes
Hi I've been a lurker for some time now and feel for the first time that I
may have something to add to the thread.


Welcome - and thanks for the info.

--
Martin Richardson

216/284 Munros (32/34 'Furths')
27/89 Donalds 372/1552 Marilyns 439/439 Nuttalls




  #7  
Old July 4th 03, 10:14 PM
Pief
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Default Bulls in fields

ayeMeHarties: |[ peter hall's ]| ahoy...
Hi I've been a lurker for some time now and feel for the first time that I
may have something to add to the thread.
Having worked with cattle for over 30 years I must agree with previous
writers that Bulls must at all times be treated with caution. They can turn
remarkably, almost on a sixpence (2.5p for you young 'uns) and can easily
out-run a human. However I have never been hurt or even had a close shave
with a Bull (possibly because of my caution) whereas I have suffered broken
ribs and more bruises than I could count from cows and more again from young
heifers. To heifers play is fun, and a friendly crowd of heifers gently
knocking you about can be the most painful of all. Carry a stick and don't
be afraid to use it if challenged, the brief pain you inflict on the animal
is nothing to what they are capable of doing to you, and they will forget it
in no time.

You mean I can wack'em with a stick?
Now I know what to do, I thought that would just p,ss them off more
--
'pief:]t
  #8  
Old July 4th 03, 11:20 PM
Ian Dainty
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Default Bulls in fields

"Martin Richardson" wrote in message


Many decades ago when I was an impoverished (I avoided the word poor,
because it could have been misinterpreted as referring to my ability as
a...) student, I had a summer job working as a chain man for the Essex
River Authority. Anyway, one day a surveyor and I we were surveying the
line of a small stream through a farm when I stuck the pole in a wasps
nest. Swarms of wasps engulfed us so we legged it into the next field
where, unbeknownst to us there was bull. This bull then chased the
surveyor who escaped by jumping over a fence right into the
aforementioned stream.
He was not happy with me after the event and made it very clear -
indeed, he refused to work with me again.


No wonder you've a fondness for wading unnecessarily through water.

I.



--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
  #9  
Old July 7th 03, 09:24 AM
Irish Murdoch
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Posts: n/a
Default Bulls in fields

On Sat, 5 Jul 2003 16:53:14 +0100, Vince wrote
(in message ):

I have never met such a malignant bunch of paranoid big girls blouses
as I have in this group. Hypocrisy is too mild a word for what gets
practiced 'ere. If you are not a regular and dare to post....boy.
Being ignored is the least after that its a smear. Mind you its only
from a bunch of ****pots. As for off-topics (the latest is SPAM, what
has spam got to do with this group!?), its not so long ago students
were being ripped into for just that, and don't try the inappropriate
badly designed question excuse here(!). But thats OK because nearlly
all of the contributers belong to the ruling or should I say
predominant clique. So thats ok. The amount of time you lot spend on
this ng stroking each others vanity (polite for arse lickin) its a
wonder you manage to get out to the shops let alone to the hills. I
bet the only mountain most of you lot have scaled is Mons Pubis and
that at a struggle!

Its about time all of you pulled your head out of your ****ing arse
and had a good look round. The only thing you lot are aqainted with is
the back of your own ****ing teeth.


Thanks for that Vince, very helpful. A very interesting perspective on how to
deal with bulls in fields.

Best Wishes,

Irish

  #10  
Old July 12th 03, 03:50 PM
Hywel & Ros
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Default Bulls in fields

snipped ...

Bulls may be harmless - however testing this theory with a ton of bull
preceded with sharp horns isn't a smart idea.....


Now *that's* interesting! I may take this further (we're talking about 3
large black bulls, with no cows). Thanks.


I'd be very suprised if there are 3 bulls in a field together. Bull calves,
or bullocks maybe, but not adult bulls. Without wanting to be patronising,
are you sure they were bulls and do you appreciate the difference ?

Large bullocks will run towards you if you cross their field, but won't (in
my experience) charge home. They are just being curious and playfull.
Obviously there is potential for trouble, but if you keep your nerve and
turn and shout "shoo" or similar they stop. Although if it's a large field
they tend to get closer each time you say "shoo". If you run you will get
chased.

As others have said, dairy bulls are nasty regardless and shouldn't legally
be in a field with a footpath, and ditto any bull on his own. Bulls with
their cows are more concerned with the job in hand, but still worth giving a
wide berth and obviously you don't want to be between the bull and his cows.

"They" say that incidents are usually associated with cattle chasing dogs
and then trampling the owners attempting to save the dog (who should be able
to run away if let go)

regards

Hywel


 




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