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Bulls in fields



 
 
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  #11  
Old July 12th 03, 05:52 PM
Five Cats
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Default Bulls in fields

In article , Hywel & Ros
writes
snipped ...


Bulls may be harmless - however testing this theory with a ton of bull
preceded with sharp horns isn't a smart idea.....


Now *that's* interesting! I may take this further (we're talking about 3
large black bulls, with no cows). Thanks.


I'd be very suprised if there are 3 bulls in a field together. Bull calves,
or bullocks maybe, but not adult bulls. Without wanting to be patronising,
are you sure they were bulls and do you appreciate the difference ?


The difference is blindingly obvious once one has seen a mature bull.
The phrase 'bullneck' gets a whole new dimension.


Large bullocks will run towards you if you cross their field, but won't (in
my experience) charge home. They are just being curious and playfull.
Obviously there is potential for trouble, but if you keep your nerve and
turn and shout "shoo" or similar they stop. Although if it's a large field
they tend to get closer each time you say "shoo". If you run you will get
chased.


I reckon they associate humans with the feed bucket...


As others have said, dairy bulls are nasty regardless and shouldn't legally
be in a field with a footpath, and ditto any bull on his own. Bulls with
their cows are more concerned with the job in hand, but still worth giving a
wide berth and obviously you don't want to be between the bull and his cows.


The ones I've seen have been most concerned with feeding...


"They" say that incidents are usually associated with cattle chasing dogs
and then trampling the owners attempting to save the dog (who should be able
to run away if let go)


Incidents are also associated with suckler cows with calves - they
become very protective, and in the sorts of places we go walking (e.g.
uplands) are the kind of animal you are most likely to meet. Give them
a wide, wide berth.


--
Five Cats
  #12  
Old July 12th 03, 10:12 PM
Paul Saunders
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Default Bulls in fields

"Five Cats" wrote

Incidents are also associated with suckler cows with calves - they
become very protective, and in the sorts of places we go walking (e.g.
uplands) are the kind of animal you are most likely to meet. Give them
a wide, wide berth.


I was once escorted through a farm by a big, nasty looking black cow with
long horns, walking just a few yards away from me, snorting and stamping
it's feet all the way. There was a calf nearby. I just stuck to the path,
kept looking straight ahead and ignored it as best I could. It was at the
end of a very long walk and I was far too knackered to consider a detour.

Paul
--
http://www.wilderness-wales.co.uk
http://www.photosig.com/go/users/userphotos?id=118749


  #13  
Old July 12th 03, 10:17 PM
Gordon
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Default Bulls in fields

Malcolm wrote

I could show you a dozen examples within a few miles of where I
live with anything from two to half a dozen bulls living happily
together.

Well, of course there isn't the same stigma attached to it these days...
--
Gordon
  #14  
Old July 13th 03, 11:07 AM
Gordon
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Default Bulls in fields

Five Cats wrote

It is also far from unknown for them to put rings in the nose of a cow
or two, just to scare the punters!

Seen that too in the Dales. The thing was staring at us, and held us up
for a few minutes until my companion said "It's got tits"!
--
Gordon
  #15  
Old July 13th 03, 05:34 PM
Five Cats
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Default Bulls in fields

In article , Gordon
writes
Five Cats wrote

It is also far from unknown for them to put rings in the nose of a cow
or two, just to scare the punters!

Seen that too in the Dales. The thing was staring at us, and held us up
for a few minutes until my companion said "It's got tits"!


M***** again? ;-)

But seriously, cows with calves can be *very* dangerous especially if
there is a dog about.

--
Five Cats
  #16  
Old July 14th 03, 09:26 AM
Gordon
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Default Bulls in fields

Five Cats wrote
In article , Gordon
writes
Five Cats wrote

It is also far from unknown for them to put rings in the nose of a cow
or two, just to scare the punters!

Seen that too in the Dales. The thing was staring at us, and held us up
for a few minutes until my companion said "It's got tits"!


M***** again? ;-)

No! She was born and raised in a small Derbyshire village, and
learned all the essentials. ;-

But seriously, cows with calves can be *very* dangerous especially if
there is a dog about.

We always kept well clear of cattle when walking with the dog, although
we didn't really walk her on farm land.
--
Gordon
  #17  
Old July 14th 03, 02:50 PM
Phil Cook
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Default Bulls in fields

On Sun, 13 Jul 2003 23:15:48 +0100, Hywel & Ros wrote:

By the way, a friend of mine from a farming background tells me tha bulls
stand side-on if they want to threaten you. The message being "look at how
big I am and you don't want to mess with me" which of course you don't.


I was wondering when somebody was going to offer this nugget of information. I
once had reason to remember and act upon it when walking the Saxon Shore Way.
Somewhere in the North Kent Marshes I came across a Charolais bull with his
hareem. They were in the corner of the field where the stile over the fence was,
when the bull wandered to the edge of the herd and purposefully stood looking at
me side on. I did a quick check of the map and hopped over a nearby gate to take
an alternative route.
--
Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
  #18  
Old July 15th 03, 08:44 AM
Five Cats
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Default Bulls in fields

In article , Malcolm
writes

In article , Hywel & Ros
writes

entirely usual for a farmer with more than one bull to keep them all
together in the same field (not surprisingly often called the bull park
in this part of the world) outside the time when they are actually in
use. I could show you a dozen examples within a few miles of where I
live with anything from two to half a dozen bulls living happily
together.


Admitedly I'm more-or-less a city-boy but I've never seen more than one bull
kept together - other than dairy bulls chained up, four to a roundabout. But
then I've never seen a farm which actually raises bulls rather than keeping
one or two earning their living.


Yet you were setting yourself up as an expert by offering advice and
even concerned you might be seen to be patronising!

Would they be youngish ones before they're
sold off to be put to work, rather than proper grown-up ones - ring in the
nose and all ?

No, these are bulls kept on beef-rearing farms. Proper grown-up ones,
but rarely with rings in their noses.


At present if they are destined for the table they have to be
slaughtered by 30 months. I suspect they are somewhat adolescent at
that age.


snip
--
Five Cats
  #19  
Old July 15th 03, 08:21 PM
Hywel & Ros
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Default Bulls in fields

debate on bulls kept together....

No, these are bulls kept on beef-rearing farms. Proper grown-up ones,
but rarely with rings in their noses.

By the way, a friend of mine from a farming background tells me tha bulls
stand side-on if they want to threaten you. The message being "look at

how
big I am and you don't want to mess with me" which of course you don't.

Fine. You just carry on with your present state of knowledge of bulls
and farming and I hope you don't get into trouble :-)

More importantly, don't offer advice based on your present state of
knowledge.....


I'll have to bow to your superior knowledge. The point I was alluding to is
that many times I've been told a field has lots of bulls in it, when it's
been bullocks (so to speak)
Or cows even.

Is it a big farm to need lots of bulls then ?

Is the side-on thing rubbish then ?
(I did state this as hearsay albeit from a country boy)

Cheers

Hywel


  #20  
Old July 15th 03, 11:29 PM
RJ Webb
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Default Bulls in fields

On Fri, 04 Jul 2003 22:14:12 +0100, Pief [email protected] wrote:

ayeMeHarties: |[ peter hall's ]| ahoy...
Hi I've been a lurker for some time now and feel for the first time that I
may have something to add to the thread.
Having worked with cattle for over 30 years I must agree with previous
writers that Bulls must at all times be treated with caution. They can turn
remarkably, almost on a sixpence (2.5p for you young 'uns) and can easily
out-run a human. However I have never been hurt or even had a close shave
with a Bull (possibly because of my caution) whereas I have suffered broken
ribs and more bruises than I could count from cows and more again from young
heifers. To heifers play is fun, and a friendly crowd of heifers gently
knocking you about can be the most painful of all. Carry a stick and don't
be afraid to use it if challenged, the brief pain you inflict on the animal
is nothing to what they are capable of doing to you, and they will forget it
in no time.

You mean I can wack'em with a stick?
Now I know what to do, I thought that would just p,ss them off more



No ... Its good advice. Handled cattle soon learn about sticks and
respect them. No 2 item in my anti bull armoury when I used to work
with them. (1 was of course a bucket of oats). Yet to have had trouble
with heifers, but they are intimidating if they get you running.

Richard Webb
 




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