A Fitness & exercise forum. FitnessBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » FitnessBanter.com forum » Fitness & Exercise » Walking
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Treadmill/earphones shocking you?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old February 12th 04, 11:14 PM
Kevin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Treadmill/earphones shocking you?


Hey again. Last time I went to the gym, I tried using earphones to
listen to the TVs they have setup in the cardio room. But I found
that as I ran, every few seconds I would get an electric shock in
my ears. I was able to prevent it by touching the metal support
bar on the treadmill, but keeping constant contact with the
treadmill is seriously throwing off my rhythm and endurance.

Has anyone else received shocks from the treadmill, particularly via
earphones? If so, how did you prevent it?

Kevin.
  #2  
Old February 23rd 04, 02:12 PM
Uncle Peter
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Treadmill/earphones shocking you?

Sounds like you're a small Van DeGraff generator!
The air must be fairly dry since this is probably static
electricity related. The moving belt is generating a
static charge which is being stored in your body;
evetnually the static charge builts high enough to
discharge between your ears and the grounded
earphones.

Go to an electronics supply house and ask for a
static discharge wristband (used for assembling
static sensitive electronic components). You'll have
to wear the wristband, which has a drain wire that
can be clipped to the metal frame of the treadmill.

Pete


"Kevin" wrote in message
...

Hey again. Last time I went to the gym, I tried using earphones to
listen to the TVs they have setup in the cardio room. But I found
that as I ran, every few seconds I would get an electric shock in
my ears. I was able to prevent it by touching the metal support
bar on the treadmill, but keeping constant contact with the
treadmill is seriously throwing off my rhythm and endurance.

Has anyone else received shocks from the treadmill, particularly via
earphones? If so, how did you prevent it?

Kevin.



  #3  
Old February 23rd 04, 02:12 PM
Uncle Peter
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Treadmill/earphones shocking you?

Sounds like you're a small Van DeGraff generator!
The air must be fairly dry since this is probably static
electricity related. The moving belt is generating a
static charge which is being stored in your body;
evetnually the static charge builts high enough to
discharge between your ears and the grounded
earphones.

Go to an electronics supply house and ask for a
static discharge wristband (used for assembling
static sensitive electronic components). You'll have
to wear the wristband, which has a drain wire that
can be clipped to the metal frame of the treadmill.

Pete


"Kevin" wrote in message
...

Hey again. Last time I went to the gym, I tried using earphones to
listen to the TVs they have setup in the cardio room. But I found
that as I ran, every few seconds I would get an electric shock in
my ears. I was able to prevent it by touching the metal support
bar on the treadmill, but keeping constant contact with the
treadmill is seriously throwing off my rhythm and endurance.

Has anyone else received shocks from the treadmill, particularly via
earphones? If so, how did you prevent it?

Kevin.



 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 FitnessBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.