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Researchers find new ways to increase muscle and prevent wasting



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 1st 03, 05:25 AM
Kevin Perrott
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Default Researchers find new ways to increase muscle and prevent wasting

New discoveries are being found in muscle regeneration for an ageing
population who find it more difficult to put on and keep lean muscle
mass. At the 10th Annual conference of the International Association
of Biogerontologists the muscle wasting that comes with age commonly
known as 'sarcopenia' is now thought to be reversible with new
isoforms of IGF-1 found in muscle. Levels of this hormone decrease as
we age and the regeneration of muscle tissue from satellite cells
declines. Treatment with this form of IGF-1 increased the muscle mass
of aged mice says Dr. Nadia Rosenthal of the European Molecular
Biology Program in Rome, Italy, and anecdotally "seemed to increase
their lifespan."

Another drug commonly used in the treatment of muscular dystrophy in
younger people called, albuterol, is showing promise in reducing
sarcopenia as well. Needless to say, these substances are under
intensive study to ascertain what side effects they may also have when
put to the use in prevent muscle loss in the aged.

Audio recordings and some slide presentations of the conference are
available at http://www.gen.cam.ac.uk/iabg10/index.html

--------------
Modern science has aging on the run. Our biology is become more and
more well known to the point where, even if we don't know how every
nut and bolt of our biochemistry works, real interventions will be
possible in the very near future which will extend the healthy human
lifespan.

For those interested.. Science Magazine is holding a webcast debate on
Nov 5 that asks the question..
----------------------------------------
How Soon will we be Able to Control Aging?
November 5, 2003 11am

Aubrey de Grey, University of Cambridge vs. Richard Sprott, Ellison
Medical Foundation

Moderator: Morton Kondracke

While headlines blast announcements of discoveries that delay the
aging process, how soon can we expect these discoveries to go from the
lab to our medicine cabinets? Find out whether there is hope or just
hype that we will be able to significantly increase our life spans in
the next century.

Join us at AAAS Auditorium, 1200 New York Avenue, Washington, DC or
online at www.SAGECrossroads.net

Ref: http://www.sagecrossroads.com/webcasts_preview.cfm
------------------------------------

Here's to living a lot healthier a lot longer..

Kevin Perrott
www.methuselahmouse.org
www.kevsplace.net
  #2  
Old November 1st 03, 02:04 PM
Wayne S. Hill
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Default Researchers find new ways to increase muscle and prevent wasting

Kevin Perrott wrote:

Modern science has aging on the run. Our biology is become
more and more well known to the point where, even if we
don't know how every nut and bolt of our biochemistry works,
real interventions will be possible in the very near future
which will extend the healthy human lifespan.


I don't share your confidence.

--
-Wayne
  #3  
Old November 1st 03, 02:29 PM
elzinator
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Researchers find new ways to increase muscle and prevent wasting

On 1 Nov 2003 14:04:51 GMT, "Wayne S. Hill" wrote:

Kevin Perrott wrote:

Modern science has aging on the run. Our biology is become
more and more well known to the point where, even if we
don't know how every nut and bolt of our biochemistry works,
real interventions will be possible in the very near future
which will extend the healthy human lifespan.


I don't share your confidence.


Actually, he's not far off. Recent advances in gene therapy and local
tissue therapy can alter some inherent genetic defects and acquired
pathophysiologies (sarcopenia, etc). However, I don't think it will
significantly extend longevity. Except in a few cases such as muscular
dystrophy where life quality will be improved more than life
extension.

  #4  
Old November 1st 03, 06:33 PM
Wayne S. Hill
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Posts: n/a
Default Researchers find new ways to increase muscle and prevent wasting

elzinator wrote:

Wayne S. Hill wrote:
Kevin Perrott wrote:

Modern science has aging on the run. Our biology is
become more and more well known to the point where, even
if we don't know how every nut and bolt of our
biochemistry works, real interventions will be possible in
the very near future which will extend the healthy human
lifespan.


I don't share your confidence.


Actually, he's not far off. Recent advances in gene therapy
and local tissue therapy can alter some inherent genetic
defects and acquired pathophysiologies (sarcopenia, etc).
However, I don't think it will significantly extend
longevity. Except in a few cases such as muscular dystrophy
where life quality will be improved more than life
extension.


Even if he's not far off in principle, there's a great gulf
between what can be achieved on a limited basis and what can
be realized on a broad basis in society (on either economic or
medical grounds).

For example, it's already well known that maintaining mobility
is a key determinant of longevity in the elderly. Yet, the
elderly in nursing homes are discouraged from standing or
walking. There simply isn't enough staff to oversee them,
much less provide them active therapy once they lose mobility
(for example, after hip replacement). Consequently, their
lives become empty for no good reason and they die much sooner
than necessary. This leaves the idea of maintaining mobility
in the elderly simple but unattainable on a broad basis.

--
-Wayne
  #5  
Old November 5th 03, 01:18 AM
elzinator
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Researchers find new ways to increase muscle and prevent wasting

On 1 Nov 2003 18:33:33 GMT, "Wayne S. Hill" wrote:

elzinator wrote:

Wayne S. Hill wrote:
Kevin Perrott wrote:

Modern science has aging on the run. Our biology is
become more and more well known to the point where, even
if we don't know how every nut and bolt of our
biochemistry works, real interventions will be possible in
the very near future which will extend the healthy human
lifespan.

I don't share your confidence.


Actually, he's not far off. Recent advances in gene therapy
and local tissue therapy can alter some inherent genetic
defects and acquired pathophysiologies (sarcopenia, etc).
However, I don't think it will significantly extend
longevity. Except in a few cases such as muscular dystrophy
where life quality will be improved more than life
extension.


Even if he's not far off in principle, there's a great gulf
between what can be achieved on a limited basis and what can
be realized on a broad basis in society (on either economic or
medical grounds).


I agree with your assessment. The practicality of gene therapy will be
limited and probably relegated to the privileged.

  #6  
Old November 5th 03, 07:10 PM
Kevin Perrott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Researchers find new ways to increase muscle and prevent wasting

"Wayne S. Hill" wrote in message ...
Kevin Perrott wrote:

Modern science has aging on the run. Our biology is become
more and more well known to the point where, even if we
don't know how every nut and bolt of our biochemistry works,
real interventions will be possible in the very near future
which will extend the healthy human lifespan.


I don't share your confidence.


I'm not surprised.. there are many people who do not, I'm more than a
little skeptical myself. Still, there is some reason for optimism.
Regardless, if you and your friends are in a tunnel and the train is
heading in your direction and someone spots a hole in the wall that
may or may not be large enough to squeeze through, is it not worth the
effort to try?
  #7  
Old November 5th 03, 07:19 PM
Kevin Perrott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Researchers find new ways to increase muscle and prevent wasting

elzinator wrote in message . ..
On 1 Nov 2003 14:04:51 GMT, "Wayne S. Hill" wrote:

Kevin Perrott wrote:

Modern science has aging on the run. Our biology is become
more and more well known to the point where, even if we
don't know how every nut and bolt of our biochemistry works,
real interventions will be possible in the very near future
which will extend the healthy human lifespan.


I don't share your confidence.


Actually, he's not far off. Recent advances in gene therapy and local
tissue therapy can alter some inherent genetic defects and acquired
pathophysiologies (sarcopenia, etc). However, I don't think it will
significantly extend longevity. Except in a few cases such as muscular
dystrophy where life quality will be improved more than life
extension.


There is plenty of research data dealing with other interventions in
model organisms whose genetics are really not that different from us
that ageing is a phenonemnon that is malleable and amenable to
intervention both through diet and possibly new generation
pharmaceuticals, initially increasing the body's natural anti-oxidant
defense mechanisms.. (google Ceremedx) or perhaps mimicking the
effects of caloric restriction (ie. metformin-diabetes drug,
resveratrol-a hormetic compound in red wine/grape skin... google
Steven Spindler, biomarker pharmaceuticals)

From an engineering standpoint we currently have enough knowledge to
extend healthy human lifespan withough needing to know exactly how
everything works and it is suggested that the amount of medical
knowledge in all of human history will double within four years at the
current rate of discovery. I'm pretty sure we're in for a few
surprises and to be forewarned is forearmed.

Kevin Perrott
www.kevsplace.net (down for at least 24 hrs.. )
www.longevitymeme.org
www.methuselahmouse.org
  #8  
Old November 5th 03, 08:07 PM
Lyle McDonald
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Researchers find new ways to increase muscle and prevent wasting

Kevin Perrott wrote:

"Wayne S. Hill" wrote in message ...
Kevin Perrott wrote:

Modern science has aging on the run. Our biology is become
more and more well known to the point where, even if we
don't know how every nut and bolt of our biochemistry works,
real interventions will be possible in the very near future
which will extend the healthy human lifespan.


I don't share your confidence.


I'm not surprised.. there are many people who do not, I'm more than a
little skeptical myself. Still, there is some reason for optimism.
Regardless, if you and your friends are in a tunnel and the train is
heading in your direction and someone spots a hole in the wall that
may or may not be large enough to squeeze through, is it not worth the
effort to try?


The sales approach of the consummate conman:

Hey, you never know so why not toss away money on my magic nostrum...

Lyle
  #9  
Old November 5th 03, 08:24 PM
Wayne S. Hill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Researchers find new ways to increase muscle and prevent wasting

Kevin Perrott wrote:

There is plenty of research data dealing with other
interventions in model organisms whose genetics are really
not that different from us


Uh-huh. I remain unconvinced of the applicability of results
in such models to humans.

that ageing is a phenonemnon that is malleable and amenable
to intervention both through diet and possibly new
generation pharmaceuticals, initially increasing the body's
natural anti-oxidant defense mechanisms.. (google Ceremedx)
or perhaps mimicking the effects of caloric restriction (ie.
metformin-diabetes drug, resveratrol-a hormetic compound in
red wine/grape skin... google Steven Spindler, biomarker
pharmaceuticals)


Baby steps.

From an engineering standpoint we currently have enough
knowledge to extend healthy human lifespan


Assuming other issues don't prove to be much more important.

withough needing to know exactly how everything works


That's a good thing.

and it is suggested that the amount of medical knowledge in
all of human history will double within four years at the
current rate of discovery.


That's not saying much, IMO.

Having the knowledge, and making it so, affordably,
individualized as needed, on a broad basis in society are two
completely different things.

--
-Wayne
  #10  
Old November 5th 03, 11:51 PM
OmegaZero2003
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Researchers find new ways to increase muscle and prevent wasting

Cancer is sometimes one of natures ways of saying to the individual that he
has had enough time (among other things). And in the case of cancer, the
mechanisms are so many and varied, that even if other anti-aging solutions
come to pass on an individual basis, the cancer problem may remain far
longer (ref. a recent Sci Am issue on the many faces of cancer mechanisms,
aneuploidy etc.)


"Wayne S. Hill" wrote in message
...
Kevin Perrott wrote:

There is plenty of research data dealing with other
interventions in model organisms whose genetics are really
not that different from us


Uh-huh. I remain unconvinced of the applicability of results
in such models to humans.

that ageing is a phenonemnon that is malleable and amenable
to intervention both through diet and possibly new
generation pharmaceuticals, initially increasing the body's
natural anti-oxidant defense mechanisms.. (google Ceremedx)
or perhaps mimicking the effects of caloric restriction (ie.
metformin-diabetes drug, resveratrol-a hormetic compound in
red wine/grape skin... google Steven Spindler, biomarker
pharmaceuticals)


Baby steps.

From an engineering standpoint we currently have enough
knowledge to extend healthy human lifespan


Assuming other issues don't prove to be much more important.

withough needing to know exactly how everything works


That's a good thing.

and it is suggested that the amount of medical knowledge in
all of human history will double within four years at the
current rate of discovery.


That's not saying much, IMO.

Having the knowledge, and making it so, affordably,
individualized as needed, on a broad basis in society are two
completely different things.

--
-Wayne



 




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