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Newbie look for good tri bike



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 16th 04, 10:19 PM
NBodem
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Posts: n/a
Default Newbie look for good tri bike

I am going to do my very first triathlon this summer and will start
training this week. I have been looking at several different types of
tri bikes. My favorite so far is the Trek Equinox 7, mainly because it
is around my price range. Can anyway give me some insight as to what I
should be looking for? Does anyone have this style?

Thanks
Nicole
  #3  
Old February 19th 04, 03:04 AM
mrs dalloway
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Posts: n/a
Default Newbie look for good tri bike

This a good question, but to expand a little more I would like to kno
if there are more people riding road bike converted to Tri/TT setup o
out of factory tri bikes

Like a lot of tri and duathletes I use a road bike set-up not converte
to tri/TT so I'll be talking mostly about the road bike aspect of mult
sport. However my bike is multi geometry. The seat post can adjust m
angle for 73-76 degrees which of course puts me more forward. With
road bike set up you need to be careful using standard aero bars as the
may stretch you out too far unless you can shorten up your cockpit wit
the seat post head or the seat post itself like my Cervelo. I use roa
bars and have not changed to pursuit bars and do not use aero bars.
ride them low and always in the drops for my steepest position. It make
a difference as well if you are a short course racer or long course
When converting to a tri set up be careful with the aero bar you cli
on. Profile Jammer and Syntace xxs are a couple of good shorties fo
road bars. Depending on your weight distribution on your bike you ma
change to pursuit bars or just keep adjusting your handlebars to get th
most comfortable, aero, and steepest position you can use safely an
effectively (if you like a steep position). The standard roadie keep
about 60% of his/her body weight on the rear wheel whereas a stee
riding tri bike might have only 45% of the weight on the rear whee
(once again only if steep is the way you like to ride). Steep and aer
are two different things. Steep denotes a high arse with low dow
shoulders. So when you are bent down racing in the drops a ball place
on your butt would roll down to your head. Aero simply means tucked i
nice and compact in an attempt to reduce the amount of surface(s
catching the wind. You don't have to be steep to be aero. You might b
flat, with your seat height relatively equal to your bar height. My bik
is set up so that my hands are below my headset when I'm in the drops.
should point out that I'm a short course racer on a compact mult
geometry frame. I use 30mm aero wheels on my bike which is a Cervel
Soloist. The wheels are Campagnolo Zonda G3s and I have changed m
gearing to be a little more hill and knee friendly: 50/39 and 12/26.
ride on what I consider to be the best saddle out there; Koobi Xenon. S
it's a road bike for me with the ability to shorten the cockpit, adjus
the steepness and then away we go and put it all back to road set up fo
long rides or riding with a group!!!


-


  #4  
Old February 19th 04, 03:04 AM
mrs dalloway
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Newbie look for good tri bike

This a good question, but to expand a little more I would like to kno
if there are more people riding road bike converted to Tri/TT setup o
out of factory tri bikes

Like a lot of tri and duathletes I use a road bike set-up not converte
to tri/TT so I'll be talking mostly about the road bike aspect of mult
sport. However my bike is multi geometry. The seat post can adjust m
angle for 73-76 degrees which of course puts me more forward. With
road bike set up you need to be careful using standard aero bars as the
may stretch you out too far unless you can shorten up your cockpit wit
the seat post head or the seat post itself like my Cervelo. I use roa
bars and have not changed to pursuit bars and do not use aero bars.
ride them low and always in the drops for my steepest position. It make
a difference as well if you are a short course racer or long course
When converting to a tri set up be careful with the aero bar you cli
on. Profile Jammer and Syntace xxs are a couple of good shorties fo
road bars. Depending on your weight distribution on your bike you ma
change to pursuit bars or just keep adjusting your handlebars to get th
most comfortable, aero, and steepest position you can use safely an
effectively (if you like a steep position). The standard roadie keep
about 60% of his/her body weight on the rear wheel whereas a stee
riding tri bike might have only 45% of the weight on the rear whee
(once again only if steep is the way you like to ride). Steep and aer
are two different things. Steep denotes a high arse with low dow
shoulders. So when you are bent down racing in the drops a ball place
on your butt would roll down to your head. Aero simply means tucked i
nice and compact in an attempt to reduce the amount of surface(s
catching the wind. You don't have to be steep to be aero. You might b
flat, with your seat height relatively equal to your bar height. My bik
is set up so that my hands are below my headset when I'm in the drops.
should point out that I'm a short course racer on a compact mult
geometry frame. I use 30mm aero wheels on my bike which is a Cervel
Soloist. The wheels are Campagnolo Zonda G3s and I have changed m
gearing to be a little more hill and knee friendly: 50/39 and 12/26.
ride on what I consider to be the best saddle out there; Koobi Xenon. S
it's a road bike for me with the ability to shorten the cockpit, adjus
the steepness and then away we go


-


  #5  
Old February 19th 04, 03:04 AM
mrs dalloway
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Newbie look for good tri bike

This a good question, but to expand a little more I would like to kno
if there are more people riding road bike converted to Tri/TT setup o
out of factory tri bikes

Like a lot of tri and duathletes I use a road bike set-up not converte
to tri/TT. However my bike is multi geometry. The seat post can adjus
my angle for 73-76 degrees which of course puts me more forward. With
road bike set up you need to be careful using standard aero bars as the
may stretch you out too far unless you can shorten up your cockpit wit
the seat post head or the seat post itself like my Cervelo. I use roa
bars and have not changed to pursuit bars and do not use aero bars.
ride them low and always in the drops for my steepest position. It make
a difference as well if you are a short course racer or long course
When converting to a tri set up be careful with the aero bar you cli
on. Profile Jammer and Syntace xxs are a couple of good shorties fo
road bars. Depending on your weight distribution on your bike you ma
change to pursuit bars or just keep adjusting your handlebars to get th
most comfortable, aero, and steepest position you can use safely an
effectively (if you like a steep position). The standard roadie keep
about 60% of his/her body weight on the rear wheel whereas a stee
riding tri bike might have only 45% of the weight on the rear whee
(once again only if steep is the way you like to ride). Steep and aer
are two different things. Steep denotes a high arse with low dow
shoulders. So when you are bent down racing in the drops a ball place
on your butt would roll down to your head. Aero simply means tucked i
nice and compact in an attempt to reduce the amount of surface(s
catching the wind. You don't have to be steep to be aero. You might b
flat, with your seat height relatively equal to your bar height. My bik
is set up so that my hands are below my headset when I'm in the drops.
should point out that I'm a short course racer on a compact mult
geometry frame. I use 30mm aero wheels on my bike which is a Cervel
Soloist. The wheels are Campagnolo Zonda G3s and I have changed m
gearing to be a little more hill and knee friendly: 50/39 and 12/26.
ride on what I consider to be the best saddle out there; Koobi Xenon. S
it's a road bike for me with the ability to shorten the cockpit, adjus
the steepness and then away we go


-


  #6  
Old February 19th 04, 02:22 PM
Old Timer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Newbie look for good tri bike

With each bike you own, you learn a little more about what you want
from a bike. Its kind of like dating. The kind of bikes I ride now
bear little resemblance to the ones I first had when starting out in
triathlon. I say that only so you don't go through buyer's paralysis.
Do some research, buy a bike. Know that it won't be perfect, no matter
what you do, and that within a year you'll probably find things on
that bike that you'd want different in your next bike. This will
happen with every bike you buy, even custom made ones. Each time
you'll get closer to your ideal, but you'll never really get there.

For your first bicycle to be used for triathlons, as opposed to your
first tri-bike, you would do well to consider comfort over absolute
speed factors. There are super duper fast aero bikes that are also
comfortable, but I'd bet more people than not haven't found that bike
in their search. Those aero bikes that are super comfy are also super
expensive. You need to be comfortable to enjoy riding, so that you'll
look forward to it and do it more and more. What I looked for in my
first tri bike was a bike that looked like it was fast. It was, but it
was terribly uncomfortable, and these days I know that if I want to
race on a bike like that, fine, but to train, I'd better have a comfy
road bike. So that is what I have.

There are way too many factors involved in the bike buying process to
discuss in one message; fit, materials, geometry, gearing, etc... If
you have a budget in mind, find the bikes that fit in that budget.
Look at what your friends are riding, compare them, ride them if you
are able. Roadies ride road bikes for a reason, they're fast and
comfortable for long training rides. Almost 100% of your riding time
will be training on roads, probably. A road bike can be adapted to
racing in triathlons just fine.

I'm no speed demon, but here are a few personal examples that might
help. My first Ironman, was on a Softride tri bike. My second was not,
it was on a road bike, a Calfee. I was 90 minutes faster off of the
bike. Sure there were other factors, but none so clear to me as I was
climbing those mountains as that road bike was. Later that year I had
the fastest bike split in my AG and one of the top 10 splits at a
sprint race of 1000 people on that same bike. I'd done that race
before on that Softride and on a Litespeed Blade but never had a
faster bike split (24mph). I give you these examples just to let you
know that its OK to ride a road bike, and to not get bogged down in
"tri-geometry".

Find a comfortable, reputable, durable bike in your price range. Stick
with brand names for entry level bikes, they will be built best, IMO.
If you make the wrong choice in gears, handlebars, stems...it can all
be dealt with for minimal expense.

I'd say, in a nutshell - don't worry about looking like a triathlete,
talk to your friends, go to local bike shops, find other tri folk in
your area, and see what they're riding. If you stay with the sport, in
a few years that bike you worry about now will be a distant memory. I
can recall what my first one looked like but not the name!
  #7  
Old February 19th 04, 05:09 PM
Joel Markovitz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Newbie look for good tri bike

Hi Nicole,

Congrats on committing to doing your first Tri!! I did my first Tri
last summer and loved it. Since it was my first, I didn't want to
drop a lot of $$ on a new bike, just in case I realised this wasn't my
thing. But I didn't want to end up riding some shoddy bike either. I
started researching used bikes and looked for some middle range
components (Shimano 105's). I ended up finding my current ride off of
Ebay. A Cannondale R600 from 1999. Full 105 component set. And cost
1/2 as much as a new one. I put on the aero bars and a racing seat,
SPD pedals, and thats pretty much it. Worked like a charm...

If you do choose to go the Ebay route, ask the seller a lot of
questions and request pictures, if they are not already on their item
page. Also, insist on having it professionally packed, even if it
costs a bit more. You don't want to have it damaged during shipping.
I didn't have this problem, but have heard stories of people who have.

Good Luck.

Joel

(NBodem) wrote in message . com...
I am going to do my very first triathlon this summer and will start
training this week. I have been looking at several different types of
tri bikes. My favorite so far is the Trek Equinox 7, mainly because it
is around my price range. Can anyway give me some insight as to what I
should be looking for? Does anyone have this style?

Thanks
Nicole

  #8  
Old February 19th 04, 06:23 PM
NBodem
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Newbie look for good tri bike

Thank you for the information!


mrs dalloway wrote in message ...
This a good question, but to expand a little more I would like to know
if there are more people riding road bike converted to Tri/TT setup or
out of factory tri bikes?

Like a lot of tri and duathletes I use a road bike set-up not converted
to tri/TT. However my bike is multi geometry. The seat post can adjust
my angle for 73-76 degrees which of course puts me more forward. With a
road bike set up you need to be careful using standard aero bars as they
may stretch you out too far unless you can shorten up your cockpit with
the seat post head or the seat post itself like my Cervelo. I use road
bars and have not changed to pursuit bars and do not use aero bars. I
ride them low and always in the drops for my steepest position. It makes
a difference as well if you are a short course racer or long course.
When converting to a tri set up be careful with the aero bar you clip
on. Profile Jammer and Syntace xxs are a couple of good shorties for
road bars. Depending on your weight distribution on your bike you may
change to pursuit bars or just keep adjusting your handlebars to get the
most comfortable, aero, and steepest position you can use safely and
effectively (if you like a steep position). The standard roadie keeps
about 60% of his/her body weight on the rear wheel whereas a steep
riding tri bike might have only 45% of the weight on the rear wheel
(once again only if steep is the way you like to ride). Steep and aero
are two different things. Steep denotes a high arse with low down
shoulders. So when you are bent down racing in the drops a ball placed
on your butt would roll down to your head. Aero simply means tucked in
nice and compact in an attempt to reduce the amount of surface(s)
catching the wind. You don't have to be steep to be aero. You might be
flat, with your seat height relatively equal to your bar height. My bike
is set up so that my hands are below my headset when I'm in the drops. I
should point out that I'm a short course racer on a compact multi
geometry frame. I use 30mm aero wheels on my bike which is a Cervelo
Soloist. The wheels are Campagnolo Zonda G3s and I have changed my
gearing to be a little more hill and knee friendly: 50/39 and 12/26. I
ride on what I consider to be the best saddle out there; Koobi Xenon. So
it's a road bike for me with the ability to shorten the cockpit, adjust
the steepness and then away we go.



--

  #10  
Old February 24th 04, 05:48 PM
road2kona
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Newbie look for good tri bike

If buying a road bike for Tri purposes is the way to go for a
beginner, what type of aero bars would you recommend?


(Joel Markovitz) wrote in message om...
Hi Nicole,

Congrats on committing to doing your first Tri!! I did my first Tri
last summer and loved it. Since it was my first, I didn't want to
drop a lot of $$ on a new bike, just in case I realised this wasn't my
thing. But I didn't want to end up riding some shoddy bike either. I
started researching used bikes and looked for some middle range
components (Shimano 105's). I ended up finding my current ride off of
Ebay. A Cannondale R600 from 1999. Full 105 component set. And cost
1/2 as much as a new one. I put on the aero bars and a racing seat,
SPD pedals, and thats pretty much it. Worked like a charm...

If you do choose to go the Ebay route, ask the seller a lot of
questions and request pictures, if they are not already on their item
page. Also, insist on having it professionally packed, even if it
costs a bit more. You don't want to have it damaged during shipping.
I didn't have this problem, but have heard stories of people who have.

Good Luck.

Joel

(NBodem) wrote in message . com...
I am going to do my very first triathlon this summer and will start
training this week. I have been looking at several different types of
tri bikes. My favorite so far is the Trek Equinox 7, mainly because it
is around my price range. Can anyway give me some insight as to what I
should be looking for? Does anyone have this style?

Thanks
Nicole

 




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