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Common Pool Chlorine and Breathing Problems



 
 
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Old November 11th 04, 03:22 PM
Meagan
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Default Common Pool Chlorine and Breathing Problems

ACSM's Health & Fitness Journal: Volume 8(5) September/October 2004 pp 32-34
Tools for the Trade: Books, Looks, and Stuff
Dickey, Christa

Common Pool Chlorine and Breathing Problems
Chlorine in pools leads to breathing trouble in trained swimmers, regardless
of past history of such problems, and the likelihood increases with the
amount of chlorine used in the water. The results of a recent study
presented at ACSM's Annual Meeting show an incidence rate of more than 60%
for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) after several minutes of
swimming in water chlorinated at a concentration commonly found in home and
public pools. Trained swimmers participated in the study by testing the
capacity of their lungs after swimming in pools with different levels of
chlorine and also by running and cycling next to the pools. Exercise
intensity and duration remained the same for each test. Researchers used a
machine to test airflow during forced exhaling to diagnose
bronchoconstriction. When the chlorine concentration was 0.5
parts-per-million (PPM) or less, the incidence rate for respiratory trouble
was just under 20%, the same as with exercise outside the pool. But when the
chlorine concentration reached 1.0 PPM, a concentration commonly recommended
for the care of home pools, the rate of EIB jumped to more than 60%,
regardless of prior history of such breathing problems. The recommended
chlorine level for disinfecting private pools can be as high as 2.0 PPM.
Because swimming is often prescribed as an effective exercise for people
with asthma, it is more important to use pools where the chlorine
concentration of the water is kept below 0.5 PPM.


  #2  
Old November 12th 04, 07:02 AM
Martin W. Smith
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"Meagan" wrote:

ACSM's Health & Fitness Journal: Volume 8(5) September/October 2004 pp 32-34
Tools for the Trade: Books, Looks, and Stuff
Dickey, Christa

Common Pool Chlorine and Breathing Problems
Chlorine in pools leads to breathing trouble in trained swimmers, regardless
of past history of such problems, and the likelihood increases with the
amount of chlorine used in the water. The results of a recent study
presented at ACSM's Annual Meeting show an incidence rate of more than 60%
for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) after several minutes of
swimming in water chlorinated at a concentration commonly found in home and
public pools. Trained swimmers participated in the study by testing the
capacity of their lungs after swimming in pools with different levels of
chlorine and also by running and cycling next to the pools. Exercise
intensity and duration remained the same for each test. Researchers used a
machine to test airflow during forced exhaling to diagnose
bronchoconstriction. When the chlorine concentration was 0.5
parts-per-million (PPM) or less, the incidence rate for respiratory trouble
was just under 20%, the same as with exercise outside the pool. But when the
chlorine concentration reached 1.0 PPM, a concentration commonly recommended
for the care of home pools, the rate of EIB jumped to more than 60%,
regardless of prior history of such breathing problems. The recommended
chlorine level for disinfecting private pools can be as high as 2.0 PPM.
Because swimming is often prescribed as an effective exercise for people
with asthma, it is more important to use pools where the chlorine
concentration of the water is kept below 0.5 PPM.


Two aparently permanent effects of my long, unremarkable swimming
career:

1. My lungs seem to be a lot more sensitive to bad air. I don't even
like being around a person who has been smoking, let along one who is
smoking at the moment. My lungs resist filling in the presence of
anything that threatens to block O2 uptake.

2. Apparently I have had all 93 colds, or however many different cold
viruses there are, because I haven't had a cold in at least 20 years.

I also haven't had a bad case of the flu in over 20 years. Whenever
the flu comes around, I get it about as bad you normally feel after
having a flu shot. Maybe a little worse. But I haven't had a
full-blown case of the flu for ages. That probably won't protect me
from the new and improved viruses coming out of the chicken coops of
China, but I'll probably get vaporized by a terrorist bomb anyway, so
why worry?

 




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