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Increasing Stride Length



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 30th 04, 04:08 PM
SwStudio
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Default Increasing Stride Length

I was reading some articles on pponline regarding various subjects,
and as I was reading about stride length I came across this excellent
quote:

"Rather than reaching out with the foreleg to increase your stride
length, think about pushing back as hard as you can on each step.
Use the buttocks and hamstrings to do so, very much the way you
might push out hard from a set of starting blocks. Run from your
hips - not from your knees".

-Nancy Hamilton, University of Northern Iowa

I really like this visualization, and thought I'd bring it to the attention
of the group. The whole 'running from the hips' thing is great, and
newer runners that read this will benefit from looking at it this way.

I think a lot of runners who are thinking about getting faster for the
first time tend to start overstriding because of their idea of where the
power is coming from is incorrect. They get frustrated because they
are upsetting their center of gravity.


cheers,
--
David (in Hamilton, ON)
www.allfalldown.org
"The most insecure people are the ones you see,
putting other people down constantly."


  #2  
Old May 1st 04, 09:10 PM
Ozzie Gontang
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Posts: n/a
Default Increasing Stride Length

[[ This message was both posted and mailed: see
the "To," "Cc," and "Newsgroups" headers for details. ]]

In article , SwStudio
wrote:

I was reading some articles on pponline regarding various subjects,
and as I was reading about stride length I came across this excellent
quote:

"Rather than reaching out with the foreleg to increase your stride
length, think about pushing back as hard as you can on each step.
Use the buttocks and hamstrings to do so, very much the way you
might push out hard from a set of starting blocks. Run from your
hips - not from your knees".

-Nancy Hamilton, University of Northern Iowa

I really like this visualization, and thought I'd bring it to the attention
of the group. The whole 'running from the hips' thing is great, and
newer runners that read this will benefit from looking at it this way.

I think a lot of runners who are thinking about getting faster for the
first time tend to start overstriding because of their idea of where the
power is coming from is incorrect. They get frustrated because they
are upsetting their center of gravity.


cheers,


Dave,

Really like what she has to say. I liked the research she did about
the slowing down that comes with age, mainly the heel getting further
and further away from the butt as the knee pulls through.

For me the image of pushing back on the step is replaced with the
image of catapulting forward on each step from the planted foot.

While picturing running from the hips, I like the image of the legs
starting below the rib cage. That way the hip and knee of one side
move forward as the other hip and knee move equally in the opposite
direction.

This way one begins to realize that the torquing of the pelvis/hips
forward and back add an inch to few inches to one's stride.

Talking about running from the hips for some people doesn't create the
picture that the hips are rotating forward and back similar to one of
those clocks where the flywheel rotate back and forth on the
horizontal.

For me the overstriding occurs because runners don't lift their knees
up and forward. Rather as Hamilton says, in my words, the lower leg
pendulums forward. Also rather than just lifting the knee, the jogger
lifts their entire center of gravity each step which aids in the
overstriding.

So your comment of "upsetting their center of gravity" is right on.
The set up is of the upset. That is the up and down beyond the normal
vertical displacement of the pelvis of a good runner.

Watching the men's winner of the Boston, his tucking of the lower leg
behind the thigh to bring it through faster was still there at the end
of the race. That tucking, that angle between thigh and lower leg,
from my reading of Hamilton gets wider and wider with age.

A piece of that in my mind has to do with the quads tightening,
hamstrings tightening so the range of motion lessens.

If you stand and lift your knee up, or observe someone lift their knee
and you'll notice that a good number have their hamstring slightly
contracted (spring loaded)
__
..../ rather than
__
....| so that when the leg come through

there's no knee lift so it looks more like

...\
.../ so as Hamilton says, the lower leg doesn't tuck behind the upper
leg, the lower leg swings back and forth with little lifting of the
knee rather it's lifting of the entire center of gravity with each
step.



In health and on the run,
Ozzie Gontang
Maintainer - rec.running FAQ
Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic, est. 1975

Mindful Running: http://www.mindfulness.com/mr.asp
http://www.faqs.org/faqs/running-faq/
  #3  
Old May 2nd 04, 07:28 AM
_!_
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Increasing Stride Length

"SwStudio" wrote in message ...
I really like this visualization,


You are a sick man. You admit to thinking about her tight, sweet,
wonderful, lil' buns rubbing together as her butt strains, and her
breasts heave in perfect unison, dontcha?
You ARE a sicko...
  #4  
Old May 2nd 04, 09:55 AM
macelroy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Increasing Stride Length

Basically, you wouldn't have to worry about that if you were trained
properly. You are worrying about stride length when you should be
worrying more about maintaining relaxation while establishing rhythm
and stress tolerance. With as little as you all know, I could take
almost anyone one of you and have you break your PRs within two weeks.
But if you start worrying about stride length then you can just forget
it.



Ozzie Gontang wrote in message ...
[[ This message was both posted and mailed: see
the "To," "Cc," and "Newsgroups" headers for details. ]]

In article , SwStudio
wrote:

I was reading some articles on pponline regarding various subjects,
and as I was reading about stride length I came across this excellent
quote:

"Rather than reaching out with the foreleg to increase your stride
length, think about pushing back as hard as you can on each step.
Use the buttocks and hamstrings to do so, very much the way you
might push out hard from a set of starting blocks. Run from your
hips - not from your knees".

-Nancy Hamilton, University of Northern Iowa

I really like this visualization, and thought I'd bring it to the attention
of the group. The whole 'running from the hips' thing is great, and
newer runners that read this will benefit from looking at it this way.

I think a lot of runners who are thinking about getting faster for the
first time tend to start overstriding because of their idea of where the
power is coming from is incorrect. They get frustrated because they
are upsetting their center of gravity.


cheers,


Dave,

Really like what she has to say. I liked the research she did about
the slowing down that comes with age, mainly the heel getting further
and further away from the butt as the knee pulls through.

For me the image of pushing back on the step is replaced with the
image of catapulting forward on each step from the planted foot.

While picturing running from the hips, I like the image of the legs
starting below the rib cage. That way the hip and knee of one side
move forward as the other hip and knee move equally in the opposite
direction.

This way one begins to realize that the torquing of the pelvis/hips
forward and back add an inch to few inches to one's stride.

Talking about running from the hips for some people doesn't create the
picture that the hips are rotating forward and back similar to one of
those clocks where the flywheel rotate back and forth on the
horizontal.

For me the overstriding occurs because runners don't lift their knees
up and forward. Rather as Hamilton says, in my words, the lower leg
pendulums forward. Also rather than just lifting the knee, the jogger
lifts their entire center of gravity each step which aids in the
overstriding.

So your comment of "upsetting their center of gravity" is right on.
The set up is of the upset. That is the up and down beyond the normal
vertical displacement of the pelvis of a good runner.

Watching the men's winner of the Boston, his tucking of the lower leg
behind the thigh to bring it through faster was still there at the end
of the race. That tucking, that angle between thigh and lower leg,
from my reading of Hamilton gets wider and wider with age.

A piece of that in my mind has to do with the quads tightening,
hamstrings tightening so the range of motion lessens.

If you stand and lift your knee up, or observe someone lift their knee
and you'll notice that a good number have their hamstring slightly
contracted (spring loaded)
__
.../ rather than
__
...| so that when the leg come through

there's no knee lift so it looks more like

..\
../ so as Hamilton says, the lower leg doesn't tuck behind the upper
leg, the lower leg swings back and forth with little lifting of the
knee rather it's lifting of the entire center of gravity with each
step.



In health and on the run,
Ozzie Gontang
Maintainer - rec.running FAQ
Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic, est. 1975

Mindful Running: http://www.mindfulness.com/mr.asp
http://www.faqs.org/faqs/running-faq/

 




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