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Does One Need To "Burn" Fat



 
 
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  #21  
Old April 18th 05, 06:33 PM
Runs With Knives
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In article .com,
"analogbass" writes:
I (Runs With Knives) had written:
Anaerobic exercise is exercise
intense enough to cause you to exceed your anaerobic threshold.


Fascinating statement..


As I understand it: Aerobic ("with oxygen") processes are what burns
fat. Anaerobic processes consume non-aerobic energy sources (thus
"an"-"aerobic" - "without oxygen"). The point at which ones level of
exertion exceeds ones ability to supply oxygen for aerobic energy
supply is ones "anaerobic threshold" (AT). Past that point, the
slack is taken up by anaerobic energy supplies (primarily glycogen).

No?

--
Jim Seymour | "It is wrong always, everywhere and
WARNING: The "From:" address is a | for everyone to believe anything upon
spam trap. DON'T USE IT! Use: | insufficient evidence."
| - W. K. Clifford, ca. 1876
  #22  
Old April 18th 05, 08:18 PM
analogbass
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I believe so, but i don't know for sure. If so and glycogen's the
energy, it's the body's buffer before consuming fat stores. There'd
have to be another level of intensity and/or duration beyond glycogen
use to get into fat burning.

  #23  
Old April 18th 05, 08:24 PM
analogbass
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I believe so, glycogen's the buffer before consuming fat stores. Fat
burning would occur after gycogen use; not as effective as cardio for
fat burning.

  #24  
Old April 18th 05, 09:02 PM
analogbass
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The term "anaerobic" means "without air" or "without oxygen." Anaerobic
exercise uses muscles at high intensity and a high rate of work for a
short period of time. Anaerobic exercise helps us increase our muscle
strength and stay ready for quick bursts of speed. Think of short and
fast when you think of anaerobic exercise.

Examples of anaerobic exercise include heavy weight lifting, sprinting,
or any rapid burst of hard exercise. These anaerobic exercises cannot
last long because oxygen is not used for energy and a by-product,
called lactic acid, is produced.

Lactic Acid contributes to muscle fatigue and must be burned up by the
body during a recovery period before another anaerobic bout of exercise
can be attempted. The recovery period also allows the muscles to use
oxygen to replenish the energy used during the high intensity exercise.
Although anaerobic exercise does not burn fat, its muscle-building
results complement aerobic exercise (and bigger muscles burn bigger
calories).

Aerobic exercise burns fat. Aerobic exercise involves increased
breathing and elevated heart rate over an extended period of time.
After about 20 minutes of aerobic exercise, the body needs to use its
stored fat reserves as fuel.

  #25  
Old April 18th 05, 11:06 PM
Donovan Rebbechi
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On 2005-04-17, Jay wrote:

"John Hanson" wrote in message
...
On 17 Apr 2005 08:07:30 -0700, "analogbass" wrote
in misc.fitness.weights:

Any form of cardio that appeals to you enough to get you to stay with
it 6 days a week, 20 minutes continuously at a minumum-running's one of
the best, elliptical, stairmachine, etc.

You could lose by calorie reduction exclusively, but you won't see the
same firmness in the muscles, nor the health benefits accrued to the
heart and body through exercise.


What if you did anaerobic weight training while reducing your caloric
intake. Would you not have muscle firmness then?


from what I have read, the closer you are to being in shape, the method you
have described is ideal. High intensity, that is a high percentage of 1 rm,
and caloric restriction. The bulk of the calories taken in shortly after a
training session.


Ideal for what ? Doesn't matter a whole lot how you obtain a good balance --
lots of roads to Rome. Do almost any exercise and maintain a slight deficit
and you'll avoid the "skinny-fat" look that VLCD end up getting. So it really
boils down to what sort of exercise you like to do/want to be good at. If you
want to lift heavy weights, that way works fine. But so does running, cycling,
cross country skiing, gymnastics, swimming, etc.

Cheers,
--
Donovan Rebbechi
http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
  #26  
Old April 18th 05, 11:36 PM
Runs With Knives
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In article .com,
"analogbass" writes:
[snip]

Aerobic exercise burns fat. Aerobic exercise involves increased
breathing and elevated heart rate over an extended period of time.
After about 20 minutes of aerobic exercise, the body needs to use its
stored fat reserves as fuel.


It's *my* understanding that's the old school of thought, and now
it's understood that steady exercise at an intensity *below* a
certain threshold is (almost?) entirely aerobic. That threshold is
called the "anaerobic threshold." In fact I took an (imprecise) test
at my health club to establish my AT. It is when you go above your
AT that you start using anaerobic resources, as well.

The kind of "aerobic" training to which you refer has the disadvantage
that, for many (most?) people interested in muscle-building or
hypertrophy, "aerobic" exercise with a strong anaerobic component may
slow their strength-training gains.

You may find this article interesting:

Concurrent Resistance Training and Aerobic Training:
The Problem and the Science Behind the Solution
http://ageless-athletes.com/concurrent_training.shtml

On the other hand (as I found out recently): Anaerobic exercise, such
as high intensity interval training (HIIT), can result in far more fat
burn, albeit possibly at the expense of strength/hypertrophy gain.

I mix it up. I do full-body strength training three days a week,
followed by aerobic exercise on two of those days, and HIIT on one.

--
Jim Seymour | "It is wrong always, everywhere and
WARNING: The "From:" address is a | for everyone to believe anything upon
spam trap. DON'T USE IT! Use: | insufficient evidence."
| - W. K. Clifford, ca. 1876
  #27  
Old April 19th 05, 01:18 AM
analogbass
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Old school, new school, they're all interesting-and inconclusive. Best
to glean from all of many sources.

HIT apparently causes more fat burn because more calories are used, and
i do think that it can affect hypertrophy, if for no other reason that
it can reduce nervous energy. Precisely why standard aerobic activity
as i've described, sans HIT, works for me with a splash of HIT.

  #28  
Old April 19th 05, 01:24 AM
analogbass
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Old school, new school, they're all interesting-and simply more fodder
from which to draw conclusions.

Clearly standard aerobic exercise as i've mentioned is optimal for fat
loss, not the anaerobic AT levels you keep talking 'about! Who's
suggesting HIT or anaerobic levels other than you?

HIT apparently causes more fat burn because more calories are used, and
i do think that it can affect hypertrophy, if for no other reason than
the negative effects on the CNS. Precisely why standard aerobic
activity
as i've described, with a splash of HIT, works for me.

  #29  
Old April 19th 05, 05:26 AM
John Hanson
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On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 21:06:44 +0000 (UTC), Donovan Rebbechi
wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

On 2005-04-17, Jay wrote:

"John Hanson" wrote in message
...
On 17 Apr 2005 08:07:30 -0700, "analogbass" wrote
in misc.fitness.weights:

Any form of cardio that appeals to you enough to get you to stay with
it 6 days a week, 20 minutes continuously at a minumum-running's one of
the best, elliptical, stairmachine, etc.

You could lose by calorie reduction exclusively, but you won't see the
same firmness in the muscles, nor the health benefits accrued to the
heart and body through exercise.

What if you did anaerobic weight training while reducing your caloric
intake. Would you not have muscle firmness then?


from what I have read, the closer you are to being in shape, the method you
have described is ideal. High intensity, that is a high percentage of 1 rm,
and caloric restriction. The bulk of the calories taken in shortly after a
training session.


Ideal for what ? Doesn't matter a whole lot how you obtain a good balance --
lots of roads to Rome. Do almost any exercise and maintain a slight deficit
and you'll avoid the "skinny-fat" look that VLCD end up getting. So it really
boils down to what sort of exercise you like to do/want to be good at. If you
want to lift heavy weights, that way works fine. But so does running, cycling,
cross country skiing, gymnastics, swimming, etc.

You forgot golf.

  #30  
Old April 19th 05, 03:57 PM
John Smith
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"John Hanson" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 21:06:44 +0000 (UTC), Donovan Rebbechi
wrote in misc.fitness.weights:

On 2005-04-17, Jay wrote:

"John Hanson" wrote in message
...
On 17 Apr 2005 08:07:30 -0700, "analogbass" wrote
in misc.fitness.weights:

Any form of cardio that appeals to you enough to get you to stay with
it 6 days a week, 20 minutes continuously at a minumum-running's one of
the best, elliptical, stairmachine, etc.

You could lose by calorie reduction exclusively, but you won't see the
same firmness in the muscles, nor the health benefits accrued to the
heart and body through exercise.

What if you did anaerobic weight training while reducing your caloric
intake. Would you not have muscle firmness then?

from what I have read, the closer you are to being in shape, the method
you
have described is ideal. High intensity, that is a high percentage of 1
rm,
and caloric restriction. The bulk of the calories taken in shortly
after a
training session.


Ideal for what ? Doesn't matter a whole lot how you obtain a good
balance --
lots of roads to Rome. Do almost any exercise and maintain a slight
deficit
and you'll avoid the "skinny-fat" look that VLCD end up getting. So it
really
boils down to what sort of exercise you like to do/want to be good at. If
you
want to lift heavy weights, that way works fine. But so does running,
cycling,
cross country skiing, gymnastics, swimming, etc.

You forgot golf.


I for one agree with this. I get an amazing workout playing golf. The
"throw my bloody putter 100 yards after missing a 4 foot put" technique
is great for upper body strength, as well as leading to the cardio of
the following "putter fetch". I've also found the "wrap the six iron around
the nearest tree after a particularly bad slice" to be good, and the
effort required to clear all the sand out of a sand trap with just a
wedge has to be tried to be believed. And I'm always the one who
ends up carrying the beer in his golf bag ...

-JS2




 




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