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Too much exercise shortens lifespan



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 9th 05, 01:53 PM
TonyZ2001
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Default Too much exercise shortens lifespan

Want to live longer? Then drop the fitness regime and put your feet up
By Roya Nikkhah
(Filed: 09/01/2005)

It is the news that all sloths have been waiting for. Scientists in Germany
have found that too much exercise is bad for you and that doing less could
lengthen your life.

In a new book called The Joy of Laziness: How to slow down and live longer, Dr
Peter Axt, retired professor of health science at Fulda University near
Frankfurt, and his daughter, Dr Michaela Axt-Gadermann, a GP, say that
everybody has a limited amount of "life energy" and that the speed with which
it is consumed determines their life span.


The Joy of Laziness
They argue that high-energy activities, such as pounding the treadmill at the
gym, accelerates the ageing process and makes the body more susceptible to
illness.

"A more relaxed way of life is important for your health," said Dr
Axt-Gadermann. "If you lead a stressful life and exercise excessively, your
body produces hormones which lead to high blood pressure and can damage your
heart and arteries."

Dr Axt-Gadermann said that one key difference between the lazy and those who
exercise was that the more active body produces more "free radicals" - unstable
oxygen molecules that are believed to speed the ageing process.

She added: "Laziness is also important for a healthy immune system because
special immune-cells are stronger in times of relaxation than stress. During
relaxation or `down time', your metabolism is less active, which means the body
produces fewer free radicals.

"If you do a lot of sport or are permanently stressed, then your body will
produce more free radicals and that is one reason why your life could be
shortened."Dr Axt-Gadermann, 37, and her 65-year-old father, who are both
reformed long-distance runners, also say that laughing is healthier than
running.

"When you laugh, your body produces the hormone serotonin which makes you feel
happy and relaxed," said Dr Axt-Gadermann.

"The heartbeat races and blood pressure is raised for a short while, without
activating your metabolism and producing the free radicals which spend your
life energy. Basically, laughing is a good training session without the
negative side-effects."

The book also says that laziness is good for the brain. It says that exercise
and stress can cause the body to produce the hormone cortisol, which can damage
cells in the brain and lead to memory loss and premature senility.

To illustrate the theory that laziness equals longevity, The Joy of Laziness
also suggests that early risers are more prone to stress and that late sleepers
live longer because they conserve their energy. "People who would rather laze
in a hammock instead of running a marathon, or who take a nap instead of
playing squash, have a better chance of living into old age."

Dr Axt and his daughter advise readers that gentle walking, their own preferred
form of exercise, is sufficient to keep people in shape if combined with a
sensible diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in protein.

"We try to put our own ideas into practice but this does not mean that we do
nothing all day," said Dr Axt-Gadermann. "Laziness should not be to the extreme
and work is an important part of life, but recreation and relaxation should not
be underestimated."

The Joy of Laziness, which is published tomorrow, will be essential reading for
Dan Kieran, the 29-year-old deputy editor of The Idler, a literary magazine.

"This book definitely makes sense to me," said Mr Kieran, who lives in south
London. "I spend one day a week in the office and the rest of my time involved
in a lot of relaxation. Having the right amount of laziness in your life is a
vital component to being happy. We live in a culture of guilt, where laziness
is scorned.

"However, I firmly believe that we do not need to do half as much exercise as
people think and it is very important to just lie down and do nothing
sometimes," he said.

The medical establishment, however, is sceptical. Dr Vivienne Nathanson, the
head of science and ethics at the British Medical Association, said that
moderate exercise should not be set aside in favour of lazing around.

"It is a very tempting theory as so often, many of us feel that we cannot be
bothered with exercise," she said.

"However, I would not agree that people have a set amount of expendable energy
during a lifetime and that exercise is bad for you. In fact, done sensibly,
exercise lowers the blood pressure, improves your metabolic state and can
improve health and contribute to a longer life."

Dr Graham Archard, the vice- chairman of the Royal College of General
Practitioners, said: "I can understand why the book might sell well as it is
always nice to be told that you can sit on your backside and do nothing.

"However, 20 to 40 minutes of exercise, three times a week, is the best way to
improve cardiovascular health, the immune system and general physical
well-being," he said.

A spokesman for the Keep Fit Association, an organisation that promotes fitness
through exercise and dance, said: "This is a most unusual idea for a book.
Exercising and building up fitness actually improves your mental state and
helps you keep pace with the demands of modern life.

"If you neglect exercising and laze around too much, you will not be doing much
for your mind or body."

  #2  
Old January 9th 05, 04:00 PM
Titan1969
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Default

I dont agree...life is about fullfillment and achieving. We are here to
do the best we can...if it shortens our life then at least we lived.
Tony Kehl
home.comcast.net/~simplefitness

  #3  
Old January 9th 05, 07:21 PM
Denis
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this is interesting. i wish we knew for sure what amount of exersize is
optimal.
d


  #4  
Old January 9th 05, 09:20 PM
rick++
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Dr. Kenneth Cooper, who promoted running in the 1960s
and started exercise aerobics, claims that extreme exercise
overwhelms the body with free radicals. He says the mitochondia
in the muscle cells of ultra-distance athletes appear damaged
like those in elderly people.

  #5  
Old January 10th 05, 12:27 AM
external usenet poster
 
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yes, humans in general really weren't designed to run ultra-distances.
Seriously, in human evolution, my guess is that no human ever ran more
than a few miles at a time (and that was probably very rare) until
sometime in the last 1000 years or so when people started doing it for
sport. We were designed more to sprint or run swiftly for shorter
distances, maybe up to a mile or two or so at a max.

  #6  
Old January 10th 05, 03:16 AM
ToTheAce
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Posts: n/a
Default


Want to live longer? Then drop the fitness regime and put your feet up
By Roya Nikkhah
(Filed: 09/01/2005)

It is the news that all sloths have been waiting for. Scientists in Germany
have found that too much exercise is bad for you and that doing less could
lengthen your life.

In a new book called The Joy of Laziness: How to slow down and live longer,
Dr
Peter Axt, retired professor of health science at Fulda University near
Frankfurt, and his daughter, Dr Michaela Axt-Gadermann, a GP, say that
everybody has a limited amount of "life energy" and that the speed with which
it is consumed determines their life span.


The Joy of Laziness
They argue that high-energy activities, such as pounding the treadmill at the
gym, accelerates the ageing process and makes the body more susceptible to
illness.

"A more relaxed way of life is important for your health," said Dr
Axt-Gadermann. "If you lead a stressful life and exercise excessively, your
body produces hormones which lead to high blood pressure and can damage your
heart and arteries."

Dr Axt-Gadermann said that one key difference between the lazy and those who
exercise was that the more active body produces more "free radicals" -
unstable
oxygen molecules that are believed to speed the ageing process.

She added: "Laziness is also important for a healthy immune system because
special immune-cells are stronger in times of relaxation than stress. During
relaxation or `down time', your metabolism is less active, which means the
body
produces fewer free radicals.

"If you do a lot of sport or are permanently stressed, then your body will
produce more free radicals and that is one reason why your life could be
shortened."Dr Axt-Gadermann, 37, and her 65-year-old father, who are both
reformed long-distance runners, also say that laughing is healthier than
running.

"When you laugh, your body produces the hormone serotonin which makes you
feel
happy and relaxed," said Dr Axt-Gadermann.

"The heartbeat races and blood pressure is raised for a short while, without
activating your metabolism and producing the free radicals which spend your
life energy. Basically, laughing is a good training session without the
negative side-effects."

The book also says that laziness is good for the brain. It says that exercise
and stress can cause the body to produce the hormone cortisol, which can
damage
cells in the brain and lead to memory loss and premature senility.

To illustrate the theory that laziness equals longevity, The Joy of Laziness
also suggests that early risers are more prone to stress and that late
sleepers
live longer because they conserve their energy. "People who would rather laze
in a hammock instead of running a marathon, or who take a nap instead of
playing squash, have a better chance of living into old age."

Dr Axt and his daughter advise readers that gentle walking, their own
preferred
form of exercise, is sufficient to keep people in shape if combined with a
sensible diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in protein.

"We try to put our own ideas into practice but this does not mean that we do
nothing all day," said Dr Axt-Gadermann. "Laziness should not be to the
extreme
and work is an important part of life, but recreation and relaxation should
not
be underestimated."

The Joy of Laziness, which is published tomorrow, will be essential reading
for
Dan Kieran, the 29-year-old deputy editor of The Idler, a literary magazine.

"This book definitely makes sense to me," said Mr Kieran, who lives in south
London. "I spend one day a week in the office and the rest of my time
involved
in a lot of relaxation. Having the right amount of laziness in your life is a
vital component to being happy. We live in a culture of guilt, where laziness
is scorned.

"However, I firmly believe that we do not need to do half as much exercise as
people think and it is very important to just lie down and do nothing
sometimes," he said.

The medical establishment, however, is sceptical. Dr Vivienne Nathanson, the
head of science and ethics at the British Medical Association, said that
moderate exercise should not be set aside in favour of lazing around.

"It is a very tempting theory as so often, many of us feel that we cannot be
bothered with exercise," she said.

"However, I would not agree that people have a set amount of expendable
energy
during a lifetime and that exercise is bad for you. In fact, done sensibly,
exercise lowers the blood pressure, improves your metabolic state and can
improve health and contribute to a longer life."

Dr Graham Archard, the vice- chairman of the Royal College of General
Practitioners, said: "I can understand why the book might sell well as it is
always nice to be told that you can sit on your backside and do nothing.

"However, 20 to 40 minutes of exercise, three times a week, is the best way
to
improve cardiovascular health, the immune system and general physical
well-being," he said.

A spokesman for the Keep Fit Association, an organisation that promotes
fitness
through exercise and dance, said: "This is a most unusual idea for a book.
Exercising and building up fitness actually improves your mental state and
helps you keep pace with the demands of modern life.

"If you neglect exercising and laze around too much, you will not be doing
much
for your mind or body."



WOW. What a great idea for a book. A zillion couch potatos now have something

they can buy to verify why they have no interest in exercise and its okay to
have a butt as wide as they are tall. That is, a great idea for the author who
will make a freakin fortune.
Dawson





  #7  
Old January 10th 05, 07:00 AM
Curt James
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

ToTheAce wrote:
re new book The Joy of Laziness

SNIP
WOW. What a great idea for a book. A zillion
couch potatos now have something they can buy
to verify why they have no interest in exercise
and its okay to have a butt as wide as they
are tall. That is, a great idea for the author
who will make a freakin fortune.


What that article (snipped) doesn't mention is
the diet portion. In addition to gentle walking
versus a rigorous workout, the authors recommend
fasting as well as eating less in general. They
argue that eating also burns excess "life energy"
and speeds the aging process.

I've got the book and it's interesting. They state
that warmer climates are healthier and other very
appealing ideas, but I'm not giving up my Gold's
Gym membership just yet.
--
Curt
http://www.emusclemag.com/forum/
http://www.bbszene.de/

  #8  
Old January 10th 05, 06:37 PM
Proton Soup
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 9 Jan 2005 22:00:52 -0800, "Curt James"
wrote:

ToTheAce wrote:
re new book The Joy of Laziness

SNIP
WOW. What a great idea for a book. A zillion
couch potatos now have something they can buy
to verify why they have no interest in exercise
and its okay to have a butt as wide as they
are tall. That is, a great idea for the author
who will make a freakin fortune.


What that article (snipped) doesn't mention is
the diet portion. In addition to gentle walking
versus a rigorous workout, the authors recommend
fasting as well as eating less in general. They
argue that eating also burns excess "life energy"
and speeds the aging process.

I've got the book and it's interesting. They state
that warmer climates are healthier and other very
appealing ideas, but I'm not giving up my Gold's
Gym membership just yet.


I suppose they've included a longevity versus latitude chart to
support this idea.

-----------
Proton Soup

"Thanks for noticing that I didn't actually say anything." - Mike Lane
  #9  
Old January 10th 05, 06:57 PM
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


TonyZ2001 wrote:
Want to live longer? Then drop the fitness regime and put your feet

up
By Roya Nikkhah
(Filed: 09/01/2005)

It is the news that all sloths have been waiting for. Scientists in

Germany
have found that too much exercise is bad for you and that doing less

could
lengthen your life.

In a new book called The Joy of Laziness: How to slow down and live

longer, Dr
Peter Axt, retired professor of health science at Fulda University

near
Frankfurt, and his daughter, Dr Michaela Axt-Gadermann, a GP, say

that
everybody has a limited amount of "life energy" and that the speed

with which
it is consumed determines their life span.


The Joy of Laziness
They argue that high-energy activities, such as pounding the

treadmill at the
gym, accelerates the ageing process and makes the body more

susceptible to
illness.

"A more relaxed way of life is important for your health," said Dr
Axt-Gadermann. "If you lead a stressful life and exercise

excessively, your
body produces hormones which lead to high blood pressure and can

damage your
heart and arteries."

Dr Axt-Gadermann said that one key difference between the lazy and

those who
exercise was that the more active body produces more "free radicals"

- unstable
oxygen molecules that are believed to speed the ageing process.

She added: "Laziness is also important for a healthy immune system

because
special immune-cells are stronger in times of relaxation than stress.

During
relaxation or `down time', your metabolism is less active, which

means the body
produces fewer free radicals.

"If you do a lot of sport or are permanently stressed, then your body

will
produce more free radicals and that is one reason why your life could

be
shortened."Dr Axt-Gadermann, 37, and her 65-year-old father, who are

both
reformed long-distance runners, also say that laughing is healthier

than
running.

"When you laugh, your body produces the hormone serotonin which makes

you feel
happy and relaxed," said Dr Axt-Gadermann.

"The heartbeat races and blood pressure is raised for a short while,

without
activating your metabolism and producing the free radicals which

spend your
life energy. Basically, laughing is a good training session without

the
negative side-effects."

The book also says that laziness is good for the brain. It says that

exercise
and stress can cause the body to produce the hormone cortisol, which

can damage
cells in the brain and lead to memory loss and premature senility.

To illustrate the theory that laziness equals longevity, The Joy of

Laziness
also suggests that early risers are more prone to stress and that

late sleepers
live longer because they conserve their energy. "People who would

rather laze
in a hammock instead of running a marathon, or who take a nap instead

of
playing squash, have a better chance of living into old age."

Dr Axt and his daughter advise readers that gentle walking, their own

preferred
form of exercise, is sufficient to keep people in shape if combined

with a
sensible diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in protein.

"We try to put our own ideas into practice but this does not mean

that we do
nothing all day," said Dr Axt-Gadermann. "Laziness should not be to

the extreme
and work is an important part of life, but recreation and relaxation

should not
be underestimated."

The Joy of Laziness, which is published tomorrow, will be essential

reading for
Dan Kieran, the 29-year-old deputy editor of The Idler, a literary

magazine.

"This book definitely makes sense to me," said Mr Kieran, who lives

in south
London. "I spend one day a week in the office and the rest of my time

involved
in a lot of relaxation. Having the right amount of laziness in your

life is a
vital component to being happy. We live in a culture of guilt, where

laziness
is scorned.

"However, I firmly believe that we do not need to do half as much

exercise as
people think and it is very important to just lie down and do nothing
sometimes," he said.

The medical establishment, however, is sceptical. Dr Vivienne

Nathanson, the
head of science and ethics at the British Medical Association, said

that
moderate exercise should not be set aside in favour of lazing around.

"It is a very tempting theory as so often, many of us feel that we

cannot be
bothered with exercise," she said.

"However, I would not agree that people have a set amount of

expendable energy
during a lifetime and that exercise is bad for you. In fact, done

sensibly,
exercise lowers the blood pressure, improves your metabolic state and

can
improve health and contribute to a longer life."

Dr Graham Archard, the vice- chairman of the Royal College of General
Practitioners, said: "I can understand why the book might sell well

as it is
always nice to be told that you can sit on your backside and do

nothing.

"However, 20 to 40 minutes of exercise, three times a week, is the

best way to
improve cardiovascular health, the immune system and general physical
well-being," he said.

A spokesman for the Keep Fit Association, an organisation that

promotes fitness
through exercise and dance, said: "This is a most unusual idea for a

book.
Exercising and building up fitness actually improves your mental

state and
helps you keep pace with the demands of modern life.

"If you neglect exercising and laze around too much, you will not be

doing much
for your mind or body."


I don't suppose the good doctor has *any data to back this up, or is it
simply some medieval mysticism to justify his physical laziness? "Life
energy" indeed.

Feh.

Kermit

  #10  
Old January 10th 05, 07:06 PM
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"yes, humans in general really weren't designed to run ultra-distances.
Seriously, in human evolution, my guess is that no human ever ran more
than a few miles at a time (and that was probably very rare) until
sometime in the last 1000 years or so when people started doing it for
sport. We were designed more to sprint or run swiftly for shorter
distances, maybe up to a mile or two or so at a max."

Sure we were. Hunter-gatherers typically covered a lot of ground on
their feet. The women might walk 10-20 miles daily gathering veggies
while carrying the youngest, and the men might spend several days
running down prey, then poking it with sharp sticks until it stops
complaining, then carrying it home. Rinse, lather, repeat.

Human run better than just about any other critter for long distance.
Modern humans have outrun racehorses for distance. The Tarahumara tribe
of Mexican Indians will often start a soccer game on the weekends and
run for 24 hours or more. The women, who spend more time inside,
willrarely play their games more than 8 hours...

I don't know of any animals that cover ground better than a wild human
except wildebeest and wolves.

We are the ape that runs.

Kermit

 




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