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Starting up again - advice



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 5th 06, 03:40 PM posted to rec.running
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Posts: 1
Default Starting up again - advice

Hi

I used to run a lot in my teens & 20s but I just changed my habits.
I'm now 46, fairly fit, & thinking of getting into running again. I
have some questions.

Any advice on a good start up regime.
Shoes - any good shoes that are fair trade or otherwise more ethical
than the big names?
Dangers & their prevention - how at risk from impact /shock related
injuries am I? That is something that has put me off starting up
again in the past.

Grateful for any advice or pointers to reliable web pages & equipment
retailers.

NB I'm in Coventry in the West Midlands, in the UK.

Cheers!

Deeply.
  #3  
Old October 5th 06, 05:31 PM posted to rec.running
Patrick
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Posts: 53
Default Starting up again - advice

On 2006-10-05, wrote:
Shoes - any good shoes that are fair trade or otherwise more ethical
than the big names?


Bare feet carry no ethical dilemmas. Takes a while to toughen up those
soles though...

Dangers & their prevention - how at risk from impact /shock related
injuries am I? That is something that has put me off starting up
again in the past.


Shop around a lot, try on a lot, and get something that feels good *when
you run* (which may be different than walking around in the shoe store).
Certain support shoes, cushioning, etc. may feel comfortable or
alleviate certain symptoms, but there isn't much evidence showing any
particular type prevents injury. Last time I bought shoes at the
specialty running store, they sold me heavier shoes with some motion
control and tried to sell me orthotics... wasn't comfortable running; I
had always preferred lighter shoes, and letting myself get talked into
the heavier pair did nothing to help my running (I learned my lesson
though).

Start slow and allow your body time to adjust to the stresses of
running. Listen to your body so that you don't do too much too soon;
you feel pain for a reason. You say you are already fit, which is good.
"Training errors, particularly rapid transitions in training, are
responsible for two thirds of injuries." (1995,
http://www.jaaos.org/cgi/content/abstract/3/6/309 )

You may wish to run on grass and trails to avoid hard concrete, but it
seems the body adjusts its form somewhat based on surface and shoe
hardness, so this may or may not be beneficial. Uneven ground may lead
to sprained ankles...

"Considerable research has focused on developing shoe cushioning to
reduce impact forces. However, only minimal changes in peak external
impact force have been observed with changes in shoe hardness." (1998)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...&dopt=Citation

Also, from 1983: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...&dopt=Citation

--
Patrick
  #5  
Old October 5th 06, 07:51 PM posted to rec.running
rvfulltime
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Posts: 2
Default Starting up again - advice

On Thu, 05 Oct 2006 15:40:11 +0100, wrote:

Hi

I used to run a lot in my teens & 20s but I just changed my habits.
I'm now 46, fairly fit, & thinking of getting into running again. I
have some questions.


If you are fairly fit already then running again should be ok. If you
have any health problems you might want to get the approval of
a doctor first. Even people that think they are fit can have some
underlying coronary heart disease.

Any advice on a good start up regime.


Start with a run walk run walk run walk routine. Try 2 minutes each
for a few days, then 2:14, 1:45 for a few days, then 2:30 , 1:30 for
a few days. Get the picture. Do this for 20 minutes or so. When you
can run 20 minutes without stopping, start to increase your minutes
until you can do 30 to 40 minutes. You don't need to run every day
to get into running shape.

Shoes - any good shoes that are fair trade or otherwise more ethical
than the big names?


The only fair trade is free trade. Unfree trade is unfair trade. If you
feel like being an imperialist telling other countries how to run their
businesses, well that's your choice. Go to a good running store.
They should have someone that can look at your gait and determine
how you plant your feet when you run and what shoes would work
well for you. If no one can do that, find another store.

Dangers & their prevention - how at risk from impact /shock related
injuries am I? That is something that has put me off starting up
again in the past.


Building up your distance too fast can lead to shin splints which can
be quite painful.

Grateful for any advice or pointers to reliable web pages & equipment
retailers.

NB I'm in Coventry in the West Midlands, in the UK.


Since you are in the UK, I can't help you on retailers.

Cheers!

Deeply.



--
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http://www.teranews.com

  #6  
Old October 6th 06, 01:08 AM posted to rec.running
tfactor
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Posts: 21
Default Starting up again - advice

wrote:
Hi

I used to run a lot in my teens & 20s but I just changed my habits.
I'm now 46, fairly fit, & thinking of getting into running again. I
have some questions.

Any advice on a good start up regime.


I'm 48, similar circumstances, started running again earlier this year.
I started with too much too fast too soon (and with crappy shoes) and
was injured (shin splints). I kept running anyway and then suffered a
stress fracture. That you're asking here before you begin makes me
think you won't be similarly foolish and bull-headed.

I took some time off, healed, then started again slowly, and now I'm
running smoothly with no further injury. So you'll probably want to
skip the injury part of my plan and proceed directly to starting
slowly. My approach since starting again has been to ignore speed and
only concern myself with distance. I run at a very comfortable pace so
that my breathing is unlabored and my form good. Add distance
gradually; I've limited myself to about 10% additional per week.
Initially I ran on alternate days, then slowly added back-to-back days.


I also ran only on a cinder track for the first few runs until I was
certain my shins could handle a harder surface, then slowly added runs
on paved (asphalt) paths. I still cannot run on concrete even for short
distances without shin symptoms recurring. I also suggest being careful
with uneven surfaces until you've regained your "sea legs".

You absolutely need to listen to your body, as others have said.
However, I think you'll find that your body has a lot more to say than
it used to and you can't listen to all of it. If you let yourself be
sidelined by every ache, tweak, pain, and twinge you won't be doing
much if any running. In my teens I never felt pain from running but now
there's always some little thing. But I'm very sensitive to pains that
continue or get worse and am always prepared to back off or shut down.

But I enjoy running much more now than I ever did, even with the little
pains.

Shoes - any good shoes that are fair trade or otherwise more ethical
than the big names?


Some brands to look into: Loco, Vetruvian, New Balance (all US
companies, first two very small, at least some of their shoes are made
in US), Karhu (Finnish company, I believe made in Finland). I'm not
recommending any of them either for their quality or ethics, just as
some names to explore further (and assuming that made in firs world
avoids concerns about exploitation).

I think it's very important that you have good shoes that fit well and
are appropriate for your gait and the running you'll be doing. That's
not something I'm willing to compromise.

Good luck!

  #8  
Old October 6th 06, 04:13 PM posted to rec.running
Daniel-San
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Posts: 51
Default Starting up again - advice


Deeply wrote ...
Hi

I used to run a lot in my teens & 20s but I just changed my habits.
I'm now 46, fairly fit, & thinking of getting into running again. I
have some questions.

Any advice on a good start up regime.



FWIW (most likely not much) in the last year, I did much the same. Last
Fall, I was drunk and got talked into running the Chicago Marathon coming up
in couple weeks. When sober, I realized that this was to be a tall order, as
I weighed 270 pounds, had a cholesterol number above 250, and couldn't climb
26.2 steps without being winded. Oh, yeah...I smoked like a chimney as well.
First thing of course was to 86 the tobacco. Long story short, that was
accomplished. Then around mid-November, I started to exercise. I ran once,
made it about 2 blocks and wanted to die. My aerobic "fitness" was
less-than-laughable, and my legs were essentially sticks of butter.

I did some research (don't ask where, I don't remember the sites,) and
decided that (for me) it made sense to start slowly (duh, in hindsight) and
build a bit of fitness before attempting to run. I joined the local park
district's fitness center (fairly common entity here in the states, dunno if
anything analogous exists in your part of the world) and used the elliptical
machine. Started slowly, maybe 15 or 20 minutes a day for a while, then
gradually got to an hour. I decided that once I could do an hour on the
machine, my legs and lungs had gotten to the point where a run might not be
suicidal.

I began with the same two blocks. Not bad. Not great, as the motions are
different from the machine, but I did not want to be shot afterward. Repeat
this every day for a couple weeks, then gradually add time. I preferred to
think of my runs in terms of time rather than distance when starting. Why?
More staisfaction in saying to myself "I just ran for a half hour" than in
acknowledging a piddly run of 2.5 miles. Kept me motivated.

Come spring, I really started running. Long story short, I feel pretty
confident about the marathon. The Kenyans are not gonna be looking over
their shoulders wondering where I am, but I will accomplish my goal -- even
if I don't finish. My BMI is under 30, my cholesterol is well under 200, and
a ten miler is no big deal. Amazing what can happen once you start.

Good luck,
Dan


  #9  
Old October 6th 06, 04:25 PM posted to rec.running
runsrealfast
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Posts: 194
Default Starting up again - advice


Daniel-San (Rot13) wrote:
Deeply wrote ...
Hi

I used to run a lot in my teens & 20s but I just changed my habits.
I'm now 46, fairly fit, & thinking of getting into running again. I
have some questions.

Any advice on a good start up regime.



FWIW (most likely not much) in the last year, I did much the same. Last
Fall, I was drunk and got talked into running the Chicago Marathon coming up
in couple weeks. When sober, I realized that this was to be a tall order, as
I weighed 270 pounds, had a cholesterol number above 250, and couldn't climb
26.2 steps without being winded. Oh, yeah...I smoked like a chimney as well.
First thing of course was to 86 the tobacco. Long story short, that was
accomplished. Then around mid-November, I started to exercise. I ran once,
made it about 2 blocks and wanted to die. My aerobic "fitness" was
less-than-laughable, and my legs were essentially sticks of butter.

I did some research (don't ask where, I don't remember the sites,) and
decided that (for me) it made sense to start slowly (duh, in hindsight) and
build a bit of fitness before attempting to run. I joined the local park
district's fitness center (fairly common entity here in the states, dunno if
anything analogous exists in your part of the world) and used the elliptical
machine. Started slowly, maybe 15 or 20 minutes a day for a while, then
gradually got to an hour. I decided that once I could do an hour on the
machine, my legs and lungs had gotten to the point where a run might not be
suicidal.

I began with the same two blocks. Not bad. Not great, as the motions are
different from the machine, but I did not want to be shot afterward. Repeat
this every day for a couple weeks, then gradually add time. I preferred to
think of my runs in terms of time rather than distance when starting. Why?
More staisfaction in saying to myself "I just ran for a half hour" than in
acknowledging a piddly run of 2.5 miles. Kept me motivated.

Come spring, I really started running. Long story short, I feel pretty
confident about the marathon. The Kenyans are not gonna be looking over
their shoulders wondering where I am, but I will accomplish my goal -- even
if I don't finish. My BMI is under 30, my cholesterol is well under 200, and
a ten miler is no big deal. Amazing what can happen once you start.

Good luck,
Dan


Dan

Thats a great story, hope it has a great ending and good luck with the
marathon. You should right a book about an experience like that. Sounds
like you have gone from rock bottom health wise up to running a
marathon. nice job!

John

  #10  
Old October 11th 06, 11:10 AM posted to rec.running
deeply
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Posts: 1
Default Starting up again - advice

Hi

Thanks for the excellent advice, everyone!

Cheers!

Deeply
 




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