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Waspy time of year



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 21st 06, 05:28 PM posted to rec.running
Robert Grumbine
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 209
Default Waspy time of year


I recently had a bad encounter with a wasp while running.
Since I'm probably not the only one who is allergic to wasps,
and it's the time of year for wasps to be a problem, I'll pass
on a few notes from a hymenopterist friend and my MD.

I'm going to continue trail running, but be a little more judicious
about when and where.

* From here to about October, the wasps are old (senile) and likely
to be drunk (rotten fruit on the ground). Consequently, the usual
rules about 'if you leave them alone, they'll leave you alone' don't
apply. They may well nail you because you look like dinner, or
you made them detour on their way home, or they're just drunk and mean.

* The other time of year to watch is about April, as the queens are
trying to establish their nests/colonies. (I was nailed once while
walking well away from any nest one April.)

* If you are stung, baking soda paste or a freshly cut onion put on
the site are good for reducing effects.

* If you're stung and are moderately allergic (as I am) then you
want to apply a topical like Benadryl and take some antihistamine
internally as well. (The swelling etc., are because of your
body's histamine response, and histamine in the venom itself.)

* Ice on the affected area may be a good idea or irrelevant; I do it
myself.

* If you're stung and are severely allergic, you need an epinephrine
pen with you at the time (you have only a few minutes before anaphalaxis
shuts down your breathing).

* You can progress from moderately** to severely allergic on the next
sting. (Hence I now have such a pen and will be carrying it with me
when I'm in wasp-friendly areas.) Or the next time out you may have
no more reaction than an ordinary person. This allergy doesn't
necessarily get worse with time and may spontaneously clear. (One of
the things which makes MD life interesting.)

** Moderately allergic, my current status, means that you have pain for
longer than usual, and swelling down the entire limb. Since I was nailed
behind the knee, my entire lower leg swelled greatly (edema, as fluids
leaked out of capillaries). The swelling was down enough to wear
shoes and socks without annoyance about 5 days after the sting.
At moderately, you might also have some responses elsewhere, as I did
this time on my arm, with several swollen patches. If your breathing
is affected, it's serious even if it's 'only' your throat that responds.


Fun(?) hymenoptera trivia:

Wasp stings hurt more than bee stings.

You sensitize allergies to wasp stings much faster than to bees (a few,
or even just one, can do it for wasps, but it's typically many before
bees sensitize you).

All wasps use basically the same venom; so if you're allergic to one,
you're allergic to the rest. (Bees show more creativity.)

Bees don't go senile and drunk the way wasps do. They're year round
in the probable category of 'if you leave them alone, they'll leave you
alone.'

There are many kinds of wasps, some of which (certain varieties of
yellowjacket) look rather like honey bees if you're not used to looking
at bees and wasps.

Giant European Hornets (my Saturday encounter) are the worst-tempered
wasps even at the best of times, and have the greatest amount of venom.
(I've had similar results from yellowjackets, albeit with less prompt
and thorough remediative response on my part. This is my 4th encounter
like this. I've been learning.)

Wasps are most active (and annoyable) in the early evening.
Hymenopterist suggested my 8:10 AM encounter was that a straggler
back to the nest got ****ed off at me making it detour or some such.

--
Robert Grumbine http://www.radix.net/~bobg/ Science faqs and amateur activities notes and links.
Sagredo (Galileo Galilei) "You present these recondite matters with too much
evidence and ease; this great facility makes them less appreciated than they
would be had they been presented in a more abstruse manner." Two New Sciences
  #2  
Old September 21st 06, 06:13 PM posted to rec.running
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default Waspy time of year


Robert Grumbine wrote:
I recently had a bad encounter with a wasp while running.


I'm Catholic but I get along very well with wasps.

  #3  
Old September 21st 06, 06:51 PM posted to rec.running
Tony S.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,277
Default Waspy time of year

"Robert Grumbine" wrote in message
...

I recently had a bad encounter with a wasp while running.
Since I'm probably not the only one who is allergic to wasps,
and it's the time of year for wasps to be a problem, I'll pass
on a few notes from a hymenopterist friend and my MD.


Saved for the future, thanks. Had a wasp sting while I was running about 2
weeks ago. It got me on the front of the ankle. I must have picked it up on
a stride and it got stuck between the shoe collar and my sock. Hurt like
hell for 5 mins, but as I kept running it went away pretty fast. Luckily I'm
not allergic, but the spot where it stung me is still visible, and left a
welt there for a few days. Wasps do hurt more!

-Tony

I'm going to continue trail running, but be a little more judicious
about when and where.

* From here to about October, the wasps are old (senile) and likely
to be drunk (rotten fruit on the ground). Consequently, the usual
rules about 'if you leave them alone, they'll leave you alone' don't
apply. They may well nail you because you look like dinner, or
you made them detour on their way home, or they're just drunk and mean.

* The other time of year to watch is about April, as the queens are
trying to establish their nests/colonies. (I was nailed once while
walking well away from any nest one April.)

* If you are stung, baking soda paste or a freshly cut onion put on
the site are good for reducing effects.

* If you're stung and are moderately allergic (as I am) then you
want to apply a topical like Benadryl and take some antihistamine
internally as well. (The swelling etc., are because of your
body's histamine response, and histamine in the venom itself.)

* Ice on the affected area may be a good idea or irrelevant; I do it
myself.

* If you're stung and are severely allergic, you need an epinephrine
pen with you at the time (you have only a few minutes before anaphalaxis
shuts down your breathing).

* You can progress from moderately** to severely allergic on the next
sting. (Hence I now have such a pen and will be carrying it with me
when I'm in wasp-friendly areas.) Or the next time out you may have
no more reaction than an ordinary person. This allergy doesn't
necessarily get worse with time and may spontaneously clear. (One of
the things which makes MD life interesting.)

** Moderately allergic, my current status, means that you have pain for
longer than usual, and swelling down the entire limb. Since I was nailed
behind the knee, my entire lower leg swelled greatly (edema, as fluids
leaked out of capillaries). The swelling was down enough to wear
shoes and socks without annoyance about 5 days after the sting.
At moderately, you might also have some responses elsewhere, as I did
this time on my arm, with several swollen patches. If your breathing
is affected, it's serious even if it's 'only' your throat that responds.


Fun(?) hymenoptera trivia:

Wasp stings hurt more than bee stings.

You sensitize allergies to wasp stings much faster than to bees (a few,
or even just one, can do it for wasps, but it's typically many before
bees sensitize you).

All wasps use basically the same venom; so if you're allergic to one,
you're allergic to the rest. (Bees show more creativity.)

Bees don't go senile and drunk the way wasps do. They're year round
in the probable category of 'if you leave them alone, they'll leave you
alone.'

There are many kinds of wasps, some of which (certain varieties of
yellowjacket) look rather like honey bees if you're not used to looking
at bees and wasps.

Giant European Hornets (my Saturday encounter) are the worst-tempered
wasps even at the best of times, and have the greatest amount of venom.
(I've had similar results from yellowjackets, albeit with less prompt
and thorough remediative response on my part. This is my 4th encounter
like this. I've been learning.)

Wasps are most active (and annoyable) in the early evening.
Hymenopterist suggested my 8:10 AM encounter was that a straggler
back to the nest got ****ed off at me making it detour or some such.

--
Robert Grumbine http://www.radix.net/~bobg/ Science faqs and amateur

activities notes and links.
Sagredo (Galileo Galilei) "You present these recondite matters with too

much
evidence and ease; this great facility makes them less appreciated than

they
would be had they been presented in a more abstruse manner." Two New

Sciences


  #4  
Old September 21st 06, 07:36 PM posted to rec.running
LSmith
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 364
Default Waspy time of year

Christmas?

  #5  
Old September 21st 06, 07:43 PM posted to rec.running
Roeret
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 97
Default Waspy time of year

Tony S. wrote:

"Robert Grumbine" wrote in message
...

I recently had a bad encounter with a wasp while running.
Since I'm probably not the only one who is allergic to wasps,
and it's the time of year for wasps to be a problem, I'll pass
on a few notes from a hymenopterist friend and my MD.


Saved for the future, thanks. Had a wasp sting while I was running about 2
weeks ago. It got me on the front of the ankle. I must have picked it up
on a stride and it got stuck between the shoe collar and my sock. Hurt
like hell for 5 mins, but as I kept running it went away pretty fast.
Luckily I'm not allergic, but the spot where it stung me is still visible,
and left a welt there for a few days. Wasps do hurt more!


Be carefull if you get stung.... I was running with a friend of mine (way
back in the early '80!! Pewww long time ago). He is NOT allergic but non
the less he got an "allergic" reaction from a waspsting. Probably because
we continued our run back home (some 20 min) after he got stung. He went to
bath and then it started to itch everywhere where he had hair..... Then it
itched allover...Then I sent him to the local hospital... A couple of
antihistamine (and a "nap" from 4pm to 7am in his armchair) later he was
ok. I never forgot that and I will certainly NOT continue a run after a
waspencounter if I ever get one!


martin, denmark

-Tony

I'm going to continue trail running, but be a little more judicious
about when and where.

* From here to about October, the wasps are old (senile) and likely
to be drunk (rotten fruit on the ground). Consequently, the usual
rules about 'if you leave them alone, they'll leave you alone' don't
apply. They may well nail you because you look like dinner, or
you made them detour on their way home, or they're just drunk and mean.

* The other time of year to watch is about April, as the queens are
trying to establish their nests/colonies. (I was nailed once while
walking well away from any nest one April.)

* If you are stung, baking soda paste or a freshly cut onion put on
the site are good for reducing effects.

* If you're stung and are moderately allergic (as I am) then you
want to apply a topical like Benadryl and take some antihistamine
internally as well. (The swelling etc., are because of your
body's histamine response, and histamine in the venom itself.)

* Ice on the affected area may be a good idea or irrelevant; I do it
myself.

* If you're stung and are severely allergic, you need an epinephrine
pen with you at the time (you have only a few minutes before anaphalaxis
shuts down your breathing).

* You can progress from moderately** to severely allergic on the next
sting. (Hence I now have such a pen and will be carrying it with me
when I'm in wasp-friendly areas.) Or the next time out you may have
no more reaction than an ordinary person. This allergy doesn't
necessarily get worse with time and may spontaneously clear. (One of
the things which makes MD life interesting.)

** Moderately allergic, my current status, means that you have pain for
longer than usual, and swelling down the entire limb. Since I was nailed
behind the knee, my entire lower leg swelled greatly (edema, as fluids
leaked out of capillaries). The swelling was down enough to wear
shoes and socks without annoyance about 5 days after the sting.
At moderately, you might also have some responses elsewhere, as I did
this time on my arm, with several swollen patches. If your breathing
is affected, it's serious even if it's 'only' your throat that responds.


Fun(?) hymenoptera trivia:

Wasp stings hurt more than bee stings.

You sensitize allergies to wasp stings much faster than to bees (a few,
or even just one, can do it for wasps, but it's typically many before
bees sensitize you).

All wasps use basically the same venom; so if you're allergic to one,
you're allergic to the rest. (Bees show more creativity.)

Bees don't go senile and drunk the way wasps do. They're year round
in the probable category of 'if you leave them alone, they'll leave you
alone.'

There are many kinds of wasps, some of which (certain varieties of
yellowjacket) look rather like honey bees if you're not used to looking
at bees and wasps.

Giant European Hornets (my Saturday encounter) are the worst-tempered
wasps even at the best of times, and have the greatest amount of venom.
(I've had similar results from yellowjackets, albeit with less prompt
and thorough remediative response on my part. This is my 4th encounter
like this. I've been learning.)

Wasps are most active (and annoyable) in the early evening.
Hymenopterist suggested my 8:10 AM encounter was that a straggler
back to the nest got ****ed off at me making it detour or some such.

--
Robert Grumbine http://www.radix.net/~bobg/ Science faqs and amateur

activities notes and links.
Sagredo (Galileo Galilei) "You present these recondite matters with too

much
evidence and ease; this great facility makes them less appreciated than

they
would be had they been presented in a more abstruse manner." Two New

Sciences


  #6  
Old September 21st 06, 08:13 PM posted to rec.running
Robert Grumbine
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 209
Default Waspy time of year

In article ,
Roeret wrote:

[snip]

Be carefull if you get stung.... I was running with a friend of mine (way
back in the early '80!! Pewww long time ago). He is NOT allergic but non
the less he got an "allergic" reaction from a waspsting. Probably because
we continued our run back home (some 20 min) after he got stung. He went to
bath and then it started to itch everywhere where he had hair..... Then it
itched allover...Then I sent him to the local hospital... A couple of
antihistamine (and a "nap" from 4pm to 7am in his armchair) later he was
ok. I never forgot that and I will certainly NOT continue a run after a
waspencounter if I ever get one!


Good reminder. If you're completely non-allergic, the running probably
doesn't do much. If you're slightly or more, then the rapid dispersal of
the venom throughout your body from the exercise-induced blood flow is a
very bad idea.

Forgot about the exercise aspect, but it contributed to my bad
reaction (worse than this one, and to a much smaller wasp) to my
first serious response.

--
Robert Grumbine http://www.radix.net/~bobg/ Science faqs and amateur activities notes and links.
Sagredo (Galileo Galilei) "You present these recondite matters with too much
evidence and ease; this great facility makes them less appreciated than they
would be had they been presented in a more abstruse manner." Two New Sciences
  #7  
Old September 22nd 06, 04:24 PM posted to rec.running
Miss Anne Thrope
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 584
Default Waspy time of year

Allergic to wasps?

The country club must be terrifying for you........it's ass deep in
whitey.

 




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