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A walk in Greenwich Park



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 9th 06, 06:12 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
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Default A walk in Greenwich Park

I intend to take my class of Year 6 pupils for a map reading exercise
in Greenwich Park on 22 May. I contacted the park to let them know
what I intend to do.

The emailed me these guidelines, and details of the paperwork they
require me to complete, including a full educational risk assessment:


http://www.royalparks.gov.uk/docs/smalleventsguide.doc
===================

The Small Events Guide

Introduction

These guidelines have been written for people who want to hold small
events in the Royal Parks. Typical examples of small events a
" A small sponsored run or walk or similar
" A guided walk
" A picnic
" A community sports competition
" A concert on a bandstand
" One-off small performing arts events such as outdoor opera, a
recital or theatre production, with an expected audience of a few
hundred people.

Advice on holding larger events in the Royal Parks can be found in
'Guidelines for Organisers of Events in the Royal Parks'.
This document contains details of:
" how to apply to hold a small event,
" assessment process of your application,
" Royal Parks rules and regulations.

Licensing Act 2003

Each Park is licenced for regulated entertainment, under the Licensing
Act 2003. You will not normally need to apply for a licence
separately.

The local council licences impose conditions upon the Royal Parks,
which must be adhered to. When you apply for an event we will let you
have a copy of the conditions that apply to the park being discussed.
These conditions will be replicated in the terms of any contracts
issued by us to you.

Fees

A rate card is available upon request. Fees generally comprise of a
fee per head (some events) and a disruption charge (all events) per
day.
In addition to an event fee you will have to pay for any services that
we provide, or for any costs that we incur. You will also be asked to
pay a reinstatement bond, which is returned to you after successful
completion of your event.

Applying to hold a small event or run an activity in the Parks

Your enquiry should be directed to the park that you wish the activity
to be held in, contact details are given on page 4.

You may either complete our online application form at
www.royalparks.org.uk or submit a letter of application detailing the
activity that you require permission for. Applications can be sent by
email, fax or letter. In your application please include the following
details:
" Type of Event.
Describe what the event is and give its full name if it has one.
" Dates and Times
Give the date and time that you would like the event to take place. If
there are any alternative dates that you would like considered then
give details
" Name of the Park
Give the name of the Park that you would like to use
" Your organisation
State who is organising this event. At a later date we will require
you to provide the name and contact details of a named individual who
will be responsible for the event/activity on the day.
" Previous Events
Give details of any events you have previously organised in the Royal
Parks
" Number of Participants
Give details of the numbers expected to take part.
" Entry Fees
State if there is an entry fee and how you intend to collect this.
Please note that
collection of money is not normally permitted inside the Royal Parks.
" Routes
If the proposed activity is a guided walk, sponsored run or walk or
similar, give details of the route you would like us to consider.
" Notice Period
For small events, we recommend a notice period of approximately six
weeks. If time is short, it is always advisable to ring before making
a letter of application, as we cannot guarantee an immediate response
and this may affect your planning time. For events between May and
September it is advisable to submit your application as early as
possible as these dates are particularly in demand and availability is
often limited.

Assessing your application

The assessment criteria of your event/activity application include:
" Is the event suitable for the proposed park?
" Would the event clash with any other?
" Will the organiser be able to meet the conditions of our local
authority license?
" What time of year is it?
" How much lead time is there?
" Track record of the organiser?

Park Regulations

If you wish to do any of the following as part of your event you must
include a request to do so in your letter of application. (This will
not guarantee permission being granted, all requests need to be
discussed with the relevant Park Manager before they are allowed):
" Bring vehicles into the fabric of the park
" Bring equipment/infrastructure into the park, e.g. gazebos,
mini marquues, tables etc
" Play music in the park
" Display banners, posters or similar advertisements of your
event or sponsor/charity.
" Run any stalls offering items for sale or literature to take
away

All event organisers will be expected to do the following:
" Put all litter into litter bins or take their waste away with
them
" Adhere to the route and site plan agreed prior to the event
" The organisers of most events must take out public liability
insurance of 5,000,000 per incident
" Provide the Park with evidence of your competence at
organising events e.g. a method statement and/or a risk assessment.
Guidance on how to carry out a risk assessment is available at
www.royalparks.org.uk.
" Ensure that the supervision of children participating in the
event is maintained at all times by competent adults
" Provide adequate stewards for the event. Runs, rides and
walks will be expected to provide stewards at road crossings for
example.
" Make arrangements for first aid.

Event organisers will not be permitted to do any of the following in
the Royal Parks:
" Affix items to trees railings, fences or other structure in
the Park
" Drive stakes into the ground
" Cook or barbecue any food in the park, or light any fires,
e.g. flaming torches
" Provide alcohol as part of the event
" Leave items unattended in the parks
" Let the event interfere with any other Park users or obstruct
other park users
" Hand out literature other than from a fixed location (eg a
stall) within an event, if so permitted
" Do bucket collections or similar, i.e. solicit donations from
park visitors
" Ballon releases
" Pyrotechnics
" Disturb any wildlife

Acceptance of Proposal

When we are satisfied that your event can go ahead, we will write to
you giving permission. The permission letter and any licences issued
must be carried with you on the day of the event, should you be asked
by a member of Parks staff or the Metropolitan Police to show it.
  #2  
Old May 9th 06, 07:05 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default A walk in Greenwich Park


"Tom Crispin" wrote in message
...
I intend to take my class of Year 6 pupils for a map reading exercise
in Greenwich Park on 22 May. I contacted the park to let them know
what I intend to do.

The emailed me these guidelines, and details of the paperwork they
require me to complete, including a full educational risk assessment:


http://www.royalparks.gov.uk/docs/smalleventsguide.doc
===================

The Small Events Guide

Introduction

These guidelines have been written for people who want to hold small
events in the Royal Parks. Typical examples of small events a
" A small sponsored run or walk or similar
" A guided walk
" A picnic
" A community sports competition
" A concert on a bandstand
" One-off small performing arts events such as outdoor opera, a
recital or theatre production, with an expected audience of a few
hundred people.

Advice on holding larger events in the Royal Parks can be found in
'Guidelines for Organisers of Events in the Royal Parks'.
This document contains details of:
" how to apply to hold a small event,
" assessment process of your application,
" Royal Parks rules and regulations.

Licensing Act 2003

Each Park is licenced for regulated entertainment, under the Licensing
Act 2003. You will not normally need to apply for a licence
separately.

The local council licences impose conditions upon the Royal Parks,
which must be adhered to. When you apply for an event we will let you
have a copy of the conditions that apply to the park being discussed.
These conditions will be replicated in the terms of any contracts
issued by us to you.

Fees

A rate card is available upon request. Fees generally comprise of a
fee per head (some events) and a disruption charge (all events) per
day.
In addition to an event fee you will have to pay for any services that
we provide, or for any costs that we incur. You will also be asked to
pay a reinstatement bond, which is returned to you after successful
completion of your event.

Applying to hold a small event or run an activity in the Parks

Your enquiry should be directed to the park that you wish the activity
to be held in, contact details are given on page 4.

You may either complete our online application form at
www.royalparks.org.uk or submit a letter of application detailing the
activity that you require permission for. Applications can be sent by
email, fax or letter. In your application please include the following
details:
" Type of Event.
Describe what the event is and give its full name if it has one.
" Dates and Times
Give the date and time that you would like the event to take place. If
there are any alternative dates that you would like considered then
give details
" Name of the Park
Give the name of the Park that you would like to use
" Your organisation
State who is organising this event. At a later date we will require
you to provide the name and contact details of a named individual who
will be responsible for the event/activity on the day.
" Previous Events
Give details of any events you have previously organised in the Royal
Parks
" Number of Participants
Give details of the numbers expected to take part.
" Entry Fees
State if there is an entry fee and how you intend to collect this.
Please note that
collection of money is not normally permitted inside the Royal Parks.
" Routes
If the proposed activity is a guided walk, sponsored run or walk or
similar, give details of the route you would like us to consider.
" Notice Period
For small events, we recommend a notice period of approximately six
weeks. If time is short, it is always advisable to ring before making
a letter of application, as we cannot guarantee an immediate response
and this may affect your planning time. For events between May and
September it is advisable to submit your application as early as
possible as these dates are particularly in demand and availability is
often limited.

Assessing your application

The assessment criteria of your event/activity application include:
" Is the event suitable for the proposed park?
" Would the event clash with any other?
" Will the organiser be able to meet the conditions of our local
authority license?
" What time of year is it?
" How much lead time is there?
" Track record of the organiser?

Park Regulations

If you wish to do any of the following as part of your event you must
include a request to do so in your letter of application. (This will
not guarantee permission being granted, all requests need to be
discussed with the relevant Park Manager before they are allowed):
" Bring vehicles into the fabric of the park
" Bring equipment/infrastructure into the park, e.g. gazebos,
mini marquues, tables etc
" Play music in the park
" Display banners, posters or similar advertisements of your
event or sponsor/charity.
" Run any stalls offering items for sale or literature to take
away

All event organisers will be expected to do the following:
" Put all litter into litter bins or take their waste away with
them
" Adhere to the route and site plan agreed prior to the event
" The organisers of most events must take out public liability
insurance of 5,000,000 per incident
" Provide the Park with evidence of your competence at
organising events e.g. a method statement and/or a risk assessment.
Guidance on how to carry out a risk assessment is available at
www.royalparks.org.uk.
" Ensure that the supervision of children participating in the
event is maintained at all times by competent adults
" Provide adequate stewards for the event. Runs, rides and
walks will be expected to provide stewards at road crossings for
example.
" Make arrangements for first aid.

Event organisers will not be permitted to do any of the following in
the Royal Parks:
" Affix items to trees railings, fences or other structure in
the Park
" Drive stakes into the ground
" Cook or barbecue any food in the park, or light any fires,
e.g. flaming torches
" Provide alcohol as part of the event
" Leave items unattended in the parks
" Let the event interfere with any other Park users or obstruct
other park users
" Hand out literature other than from a fixed location (eg a
stall) within an event, if so permitted
" Do bucket collections or similar, i.e. solicit donations from
park visitors
" Ballon releases
" Pyrotechnics
" Disturb any wildlife

Acceptance of Proposal

When we are satisfied that your event can go ahead, we will write to
you giving permission. The permission letter and any licences issued
must be carried with you on the day of the event, should you be asked
by a member of Parks staff or the Metropolitan Police to show it.




And probably no guidelines (or paperwork at all) if you want to take your
class for a walk down the central reservation of the M1.
Gerry


  #3  
Old May 9th 06, 07:34 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default A walk in Greenwich Park

On Tue, 9 May 2006 19:05:44 +0100, "Gerald Oliver Swift"
wrote:

And probably no guidelines (or paperwork at all) if you want to take your
class for a walk down the central reservation of the M1.


In the case of the A1 you may well be right, but I expect it's quite
difficult to get consent to walk down the M1 - it's only open to fully
licensed motor vehicle drivers with engine capacity over 50cc - IIRC.
  #5  
Old May 10th 06, 06:57 AM posted to uk.rec.walking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default A walk in Greenwich Park

On Tue, 9 May 2006 23:27:37 +0100, Fran
wrote:

I intend to take my class of Year 6 pupils for a map reading exercise
in Greenwich Park on 22 May. I contacted the park to let them know
what I intend to do.

The emailed me these guidelines, and details of the paperwork they
require me to complete, including a full educational risk assessment:

Bloody hell! I'll bet that's the last time you bother to tell anyone in
advance what your plans are.


Yes. If it wasn't the first time I'd run a map reading exercise like
this, I'd have given up on Greenwich Park, caught the bus along
Shooters' Hill, taking advantage of Ken's excellent free travel scheme
for children, and used Oxleas Wood instead.

What was really off-putting, however, was when I discussed the
activity with my deputy head. She warned me about the dozens of men
which were likely to be hiding in the bushes in the park, ready to
leap out on the children, abduct them, and treat them is a most
immoral manner before killing them and throwing their bodies in the
Thames.

I pointed out that crossing the A2 on the way to the park was way more
dangerous, and that of the 68 children under 16, abducted by strangers
last year, every one was recovered within 24 hours, although several
had been mistreated. That compares with 170 children killed on the
roads, and thousands seriously injured.

Fortunately, the headteacher had more sense, which is, perhaps, why
the head is a head and the deputy a deputy. Stll, even the deputy
compares favourably to the job-worths in Greenwich Park.
  #6  
Old May 10th 06, 07:25 AM posted to uk.rec.walking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default A walk in Greenwich Park

Hi,
unfortunately it is us the public who are to blame. If
someone/anyone/you?, hurt yourself the first response seems to be who
can I sue or write an outraged letter of complaint to. I will never
forget on the Jimmy Young show they used to have a legal expert called
Begally Bill Thomas who I think is now in the Lords, and one of his
phrases for minor mishaps was "part of life's rich pageant" and if we
all took this view a little more often perhaps people would not be so
scared of giving permission for things on property in their charge.
Also not having a pop at you but why did you even feel the need to
inform them you were coming, I am not familiar with Greenwich park but
I guess it is quite big and capable of coping with an extra 30 or so
Children, not a case of covering yours or the schools back was it?
Cheers Beds

  #7  
Old May 10th 06, 08:29 AM posted to uk.rec.walking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default A walk in Greenwich Park

Tom Crispin writes:

Yes. If it wasn't the first time I'd run a map reading exercise like
this, I'd have given up on Greenwich Park, caught the bus along
Shooters' Hill, taking advantage of Ken's excellent free travel scheme
for children, and used Oxleas Wood instead.


It may worth contacting your local orienteering club to see what they can
help with. Our club does things with a number of primary schools in our
area, and have worked out access and maps to various parks and other easy
areas.

Roos
  #8  
Old May 10th 06, 12:27 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default A walk in Greenwich Park

Following up to Tom Crispin

The emailed me these guidelines, and details of the paperwork they
require me to complete, including a full educational risk assessment:


IIRC they require written permission for me to use a tripod with
my camera or something, I have ignored it so far.
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" -- you can email [email protected] this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" -- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
  #9  
Old May 10th 06, 05:27 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default A walk in Greenwich Park

On 10 May 2006 07:29:20 GMT, Roos Eisma wrote:

Tom Crispin writes:

Yes. If it wasn't the first time I'd run a map reading exercise like
this, I'd have given up on Greenwich Park, caught the bus along
Shooters' Hill, taking advantage of Ken's excellent free travel scheme
for children, and used Oxleas Wood instead.


It may worth contacting your local orienteering club to see what they can
help with. Our club does things with a number of primary schools in our
area, and have worked out access and maps to various parks and other easy
areas.


Dartford Orienteering Klubb has been great. They've supplied an
excellent orienteering map of Greenwich Park.

I had another email from the Park today asking if I'd be marking out
the course in the park in anyway. I replied that the children would
just be supplied with a map, marked with various locations, and a quiz
type sheet to fill in, e.g. at the police box the question is, "What
would The Doctor use this for?" I went on to say that I'd instruct
the class to take nothing but memories, leave nothing but footprints
and pick nothing but their nose.

I wonder what they'll make of my schoolboy humour!
  #10  
Old May 10th 06, 10:27 PM posted to uk.rec.walking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default A walk in Greenwich Park

e said...
On Tue, 9 May 2006 23:27:37 +0100, Fran
wrote:

I intend to take my class of Year 6 pupils for a map reading exercise
in Greenwich Park on 22 May. I contacted the park to let them know
what I intend to do.

The emailed me these guidelines, and details of the paperwork they
require me to complete, including a full educational risk assessment:

Bloody hell! I'll bet that's the last time you bother to tell anyone in
advance what your plans are.


Yes. If it wasn't the first time I'd run a map reading exercise like
this, I'd have given up on Greenwich Park, caught the bus along
Shooters' Hill, taking advantage of Ken's excellent free travel scheme
for children, and used Oxleas Wood instead.


But - what about all the mad people on the bus...?

What was really off-putting, however, was when I discussed the
activity with my deputy head. She warned me about the dozens of men
which were likely to be hiding in the bushes in the park, ready to
leap out on the children, abduct them, and treat them is a most
immoral manner before killing them and throwing their bodies in the
Thames.


'Just' William
Oh yes, there are bound to be litchrully *hundreds* of those, just
waiting for children to come along so that they can jump out on them
an' thump them and then do orful things to them. Forriners an' all I
spect. Got to be forriners, 'cos it's not as if anyone what wasn't
forrin'd do anything like that...
/William

Violet Elizabeth Bott
If they jump out at me I'll thcweam and I'll thcweam until I'm thick!
And I can, too!
/brat

I pointed out that crossing the A2 on the way to the park was way more
dangerous, and that of the 68 children under 16, abducted by strangers
last year, every one was recovered within 24 hours, although several
had been mistreated. That compares with 170 children killed on the
roads, and thousands seriously injured.


Exactly. What really irritates me is the way the lesser risk is
perceived to be the greater. I've managed to get through 47 years with
only one incident where I was accosted by a (probably harmless but who
knows) flasher, whereas I've had dozens of near-misses as a pedestrian,
cyclist, motorcyclist and car driver on the road. I'm not going to
pretend that none of them were my fault, but that's not really the point
here. The point is that incidents on the road (and even on the pavement
sometimes - grrr) are two a penny; nasty men lurking in bushes are very,
very rare. And in any case, hasn't your rather stupid deputy ever heard
that more often than not the perpetrator of crimes against children
turns out in the end to have been someone the child knew and trusted?

Fortunately, the headteacher had more sense, which is, perhaps, why
the head is a head and the deputy a deputy. Stll, even the deputy
compares favourably to the job-worths in Greenwich Park.

You have my sympathy. The world's gone completely hatstand :-(

--
To reply see 'from' in headers; lose the domain, and insert dots and @
where common sense dictates.
 




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